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Scout Tank and Top in Friedlander Fabric

When I was in Australia, I picked up a great top at a local clothing store. (It’s not pictured on their site, but I found some shots here and here). I just love the shape and style and have been wearing it often. Because of that, I thought it’d be fun to try to recreate it so I’d have a few more.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

Lucky for me, the Scout tee by Grainline is a great starting point. It’s a project that I’ve made many times (one version is here), and each time I make it, I tweak things here and there to customize fit and/or style. That’s the beauty of finding a good pattern. It can give you much freedom to try new things!

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

This first version stays pretty true to the Australian inspiration in that it has a wider collar, curved hem and some billowing fullness dropping down at the sides.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

To make these changes, I added width to the sides–both to the front and back tapering out from the bust. I also added length to the hem so that I could curve it, and then the neck band was a relatively easy add. I roughly went off the thickness of the inspiration piece, cut a new band on the bias and installed it.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The Australian original is made from a sturdier cotton, but this version is much lighter. Lawn tops are pretty great (I might be obsessed), and I’d been wanting to make a top out of this green print from my latest collection. The result drapes nicely and will be perfectly cool and appropriate for the summer.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The original also has some neat seams by the shoulders that I had a fun time drafting into the Scout. Using this particular fabric doesn’t make it very pronounced, but I could see playing with more contrast in a future version if the mood should strike.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The next version has a few other design tweaks.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

And I’ll admit, this was kind of a compulsive sew. I was eager to make a shirt with the big tree stripe from my latest collection, using the stripe as a fun element in the bodice.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I also decided to make it right before leaving for QuiltCon this past February. (There’s nothing more fun than being able to pack a new garment for a trip!)

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Again, I started with the Scout tee, making the adjustments to the side seems and length. When it came time for sleeves, I decided to omit them. Sleeveless is perfect for Florida, and it’s also easy to layer with a cardigan.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

After some debate, I decided to not do the collar on this one. I liked the idea of the print being front, center and unencumbered by much else.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The hem, arm and neck openings are finished with bias tape. When I make bias tape, I often make more than I need so that I always have some on hand. Here I used some from my stash, and it worked perfectly.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I kept the additional shoulder seam and played just a bit with the part of the print that I used. It’s a subtle detail that adds that little extra something.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Inspiration : This shirt from Vic and Bert, via my travels in Australia

Pattern (with some adjustments) : Scout Tee by Grainline

Fabric : Sleeved version is made from my Friedlander Lawn collection, and the sleeveless version features a print from my Friedlander collection with bias tape made from Cambridge Lawn in Nude by Robert Kaufman

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SockSacks in Friedlander and Euclid.

I love a good gift-worthy project, and these SockSacks in my Friedlander and Euclid fabrics are some recent gifts that I made after being given one myself.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started when a friend made this one for me.

Sevenberry Sock Sack

I was immediately smitten with the fabrics and quickly fell deeper for it when I realized how perfect it is for transporting a lot of things. Obviously, it’s awesome for knitting–there are two interior sections divided by a zippered pouch. But it also works well as a travel bag for other things–like snacks and tea–both of which I travel with often. The compartments hold what you need, while keeping them divided and sorted nicely. Plus, it’s so darn pretty! (Fabrics in this one that was gifted to me are Sevenberry and London Calling from Robert Kaufman.)

Sevenberry Sock Sack

Since I’ve been loving mine so much, I decided that I needed to make a few more for some friends.

This one has some euclid on the outside…

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of my newest stuff on the inside and at the top

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

A little bit of carkai and more new stuff

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s a better pic inside. You can see the snap tabs, which are really great for keeping your yarn in check. I’m working from 2 skeins with my current knitting project, and the tabs are keeping everything anchored and tangle-free. Yay. Plus, the zippered section. You know that’s handy.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Picking fabrics is always one of my favorite parts. This project is fun for that because there are places large and small, meaning plenty of possibilities for print and color play.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

The other one that I made has this print on the outside, this one at the top, and this and this one the inside.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

I followed the instructions for both without making any changes, including not using interfacing. In general, I like things to have structure, but I also liked the idea of making these first two as instructed to see how I liked the weight. Of course I knew that using Euclid in the first version would give it more structure–and it does, but the quilting-weight-only version works out just as well! It’s a soft bag that isn’t likely to be put under much stress, so it makes sense. I did, however, elect for lawn in both of the drawstring casings. Lawn was used in the version given to me, and I really liked how lightweight it made it. The cord cinches everything up nicely, and while I’m sure quilting weight would work well for that part too, I was eager to embrace using the lawn.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : SockSack by Ramona Rose (I made the largest size, but after making that, I realized the size that I was given is the medium size. Both are nice! I’ll bet the small size is super cute.)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

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Wildabon Market Tote.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes (/most of the time) I get stuck on an idea that I can’t wait to see through. This Wildabon Market Tote is one of them.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Wildabon has been such a fun project in every way, and I’ve been eager to appliqué it on to just about everything. Here’s my Wildabon Market Tote, aka a mashup of Anna Graham’s Market Tote (from her book, Handmade Style) and the designs from my Wildabon pattern with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

With so many designs in the pattern, I like that you can pull one motif out and play with it on its own whether it’s in a bag like this or a pillow sham or anything smaller. Plus, if you’re feeling a little overwhelmed by appliqué or taking on something large, this is a great place to start. And, if you’re worrying about handwork and durability, don’t. I’ve been appliquéing on to bags for a while now, and I haven’t had any issues yet. Even if you are a new appliqué-er, quilting over your handwork–just like I did here–adds another layer insurance.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

This was my first time sewing with leather handles, and I have to say that I’m pretty into them after this adventure. I picked these up from Noodlehead’s shop, and they couldn’t have been any easier to work with. Plus, they are so pretty! I love how they kick the project up a notch. Installation wasn’t as scary as I imagined it could be. I used (my new) teflon foot, which made it super easy, as well as polyester thread as it was recommended in the pattern. Next time, I think I’ll be ready to give rivets a try.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s always fun mixing fabrics, and you’ll notice euclid on the outside (which is great, because of its heftiness) with lots of friedlander and friedlander lawn on the inside. I can’t tell you how much fun it is to appliqué with fabrics thick and thin, plus the options for mixing prints…yes, this is how I like to do it!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It was fun getting that print situated on my inside pocket. I love a project where you can play around with your prints.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

When I was positioning the appliqué motif, I also thought about where I’d put the handle, how the side piece would be cut and how it’d wear. I like that the design spills from the top and spreads itself across the side.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this bag can hold a lot! Here it is loaded up with my scrappy collection quilt, which–by the way–I’ve been hand quilting on and off, more off than on lately. But it’s coming together!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

patterns : Wildabon from me and Market Tote from Handmade Style by Anna Graham

fabrics : Euclid, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

zipper : from Zipit

leather handles : from Noodlehead

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

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