Ruffle Front Jacket in Euclid.

Last week, I was in North Carolina teaching a couple of classes. I had a lot of fun, the students were all great. The local shop, Sewingly Yours, had just gotten some Euclid in, and they’d made a nice pile of it along with many of my other fabrics for the students to browse through. It was fun watching everyone working with and finding their own combinations for their projects–always one of my favorite parts of teaching. While in class, I received quite a few questions about some of my Euclid garments, and so I thought I’d share my Ruffle Front Jacket and Inari Tee dress.

First up, my Ruffle Front Jacket. So cozy and comfy…

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like many of the projects I’ve made with Euclid, this Ruffle Front Jacket is one I’d been eyeing for a while. The pattern can be found in the book, Simple Modern Sewing, a Japanese sewing book, but this one has been translated!

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s a rather speedy project after you get your pieces traced out…and I think you might have to add seam allowances…it’s been awhile, so check the instructions. After that, cutting and sewing take no time at all.

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

I didn’t make any changes to the fit. The way the casing and cording work, it’s pretty easy to bunch up the neckline or loosen if needed. It’s a great layering piece, and has both a long and short sleeve option. I went for the shorter sleeve.

There’s also facing, which becomes the casing for the cording. Here you can add in a different fabric, which I always like the opportunity to do. I used a print from Carkai.

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

And cording, this is another project where you need some cording…which seemed to be a theme with my Euclid projects (see Seabrook bags and Landgate). After gathering (/hoarding) and auditioning several options, I liked the idea of making my own. In fact, I used the same fabric to make the cording as I did for my Landgate. In hindsight, it might have been smart to make it all at once, but that would have implied I had everything planned out…ha! (I didn’t.)

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Inari Tee Dress. The pattern is by Named, and you might recognize this from the Euclid Lookbook.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

The Inari Tee Dress is one of my favorites. I’ve made this pattern at least half a dozen times and in varying lengths and from varying fabrics. It’s a speedy sew, and I love the style of it. I especially like using linen for this project because it becomes the perfect layering piece.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

For the photoshoot, I layered it over a sleeveless Alder (pattern by Grainline, shortened to shirt length) in Carkai. I just love this combination.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

If you haven’t made the Inari before, I’ll give you a heads up that Named writes patterns for someone who is 5’8″ (they are Finnish!), which I am definitely not. So I’ve shortened this guy by several inches. I’ve also played around with the sleeve/armhole fit, but it’s still on the roomier side.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

So there you have it, two more garments in Euclid. Both speedy, and both pieces I’ve had no problem working into my wardrobe and across a few different seasons.

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One Response to Ruffle Front Jacket in Euclid.

  1. Kim October 4, 2016 at 10:24 pm #

    Carolyn, I ordered the book and I’m expecting it any day now. I also finished my appliqué. I tagged you in my IG post. Far from perfect but so much fun!

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