Tag Archives | essex linen

SockSacks in Friedlander and Euclid.

I love a good gift-worthy project, and these SockSacks in my Friedlander and Euclid fabrics are some recent gifts that I made after being given one myself.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started when a friend made this one for me.

Sevenberry Sock Sack

I was immediately smitten with the fabrics and quickly fell deeper for it when I realized how perfect it is for transporting a lot of things. Obviously, it’s awesome for knitting–there are two interior sections divided by a zippered pouch. But it also works well as a travel bag for other things–like snacks and tea–both of which I travel with often. The compartments hold what you need, while keeping them divided and sorted nicely. Plus, it’s so darn pretty! (Fabrics in this one that was gifted to me are Sevenberry and London Calling from Robert Kaufman.)

Sevenberry Sock Sack

Since I’ve been loving mine so much, I decided that I needed to make a few more for some friends.

This one has some euclid on the outside…

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of my newest stuff on the inside and at the top

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

A little bit of carkai and more new stuff

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s a better pic inside. You can see the snap tabs, which are really great for keeping your yarn in check. I’m working from 2 skeins with my current knitting project, and the tabs are keeping everything anchored and tangle-free. Yay. Plus, the zippered section. You know that’s handy.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Picking fabrics is always one of my favorite parts. This project is fun for that because there are places large and small, meaning plenty of possibilities for print and color play.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

The other one that I made has this print on the outside, this one at the top, and this and this one the inside.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

I followed the instructions for both without making any changes, including not using interfacing. In general, I like things to have structure, but I also liked the idea of making these first two as instructed to see how I liked the weight. Of course I knew that using Euclid in the first version would give it more structure–and it does, but the quilting-weight-only version works out just as well! It’s a soft bag that isn’t likely to be put under much stress, so it makes sense. I did, however, elect for lawn in both of the drawstring casings. Lawn was used in the version given to me, and I really liked how lightweight it made it. The cord cinches everything up nicely, and while I’m sure quilting weight would work well for that part too, I was eager to embrace using the lawn.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : SockSack by Ramona Rose (I made the largest size, but after making that, I realized the size that I was given is the medium size. Both are nice! I’ll bet the small size is super cute.)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

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Wildabon Market Tote.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes (/most of the time) I get stuck on an idea that I can’t wait to see through. This Wildabon Market Tote is one of them.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Wildabon has been such a fun project in every way, and I’ve been eager to appliqué it on to just about everything. Here’s my Wildabon Market Tote, aka a mashup of Anna Graham’s Market Tote (from her book, Handmade Style) and the designs from my Wildabon pattern with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

With so many designs in the pattern, I like that you can pull one motif out and play with it on its own whether it’s in a bag like this or a pillow sham or anything smaller. Plus, if you’re feeling a little overwhelmed by appliqué or taking on something large, this is a great place to start. And, if you’re worrying about handwork and durability, don’t. I’ve been appliquéing on to bags for a while now, and I haven’t had any issues yet. Even if you are a new appliqué-er, quilting over your handwork–just like I did here–adds another layer insurance.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

This was my first time sewing with leather handles, and I have to say that I’m pretty into them after this adventure. I picked these up from Noodlehead’s shop, and they couldn’t have been any easier to work with. Plus, they are so pretty! I love how they kick the project up a notch. Installation wasn’t as scary as I imagined it could be. I used (my new) teflon foot, which made it super easy, as well as polyester thread as it was recommended in the pattern. Next time, I think I’ll be ready to give rivets a try.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s always fun mixing fabrics, and you’ll notice euclid on the outside (which is great, because of its heftiness) with lots of friedlander and friedlander lawn on the inside. I can’t tell you how much fun it is to appliqué with fabrics thick and thin, plus the options for mixing prints…yes, this is how I like to do it!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It was fun getting that print situated on my inside pocket. I love a project where you can play around with your prints.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

When I was positioning the appliqué motif, I also thought about where I’d put the handle, how the side piece would be cut and how it’d wear. I like that the design spills from the top and spreads itself across the side.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this bag can hold a lot! Here it is loaded up with my scrappy collection quilt, which–by the way–I’ve been hand quilting on and off, more off than on lately. But it’s coming together!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

patterns : Wildabon from me and Market Tote from Handmade Style by Anna Graham

fabrics : Euclid, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

zipper : from Zipit

leather handles : from Noodlehead

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

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Wildabon Quilt with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Want to know one of the most fun things I did in 2016? Easy. It’d have to be my new Wildabon quilt–a collaboration with Leah Duncan. Everything about it was such a delight. To start, I’m a massive Leah Duncan fan. She has a beautiful and distinct style that is all her own. I’ve loved sewing with her fabrics, collecting her goods and just following her work and business as she continues to put out really lovely things. It also doesn’t hurt that she’s a kind and thoughtful person too. (Win win win).

Willow Tanks . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started while sewing with some of Leah’s fabric one weekend. The Willow tank on the right is made with fabric from Leah’s Lore collection with Cloud9. (The fabric on the left is some Nani Iro in case you’re wondering.) While sewing along, I started to wonder what it would be like to appliqué some of those shapes, and I kind of became a little obsessed with the idea. Next, I reached out to Leah to see if she was interested in working together, and she was. Hoo-rah!

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

From working with Leah and her designs in the beginning, to making this project a reality, Wildabon was satisfying from all angles. In terms of the appliqué itself, the 7 different design motifs, all of which range in terms of skill level, shape and size, are really fun to tackle on any sized project. If you’ve appliquéd before (or not), there is enough variety of shape to keep you entertained and challenged.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In terms of fabric and composition, I’ll happily reuse the word satisfying here too, because it fits. While I’m not at all opposed to projects with limited uses of fabric and color–they can be a great challenge–I also love a project where you can use it all.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a project where you can build out as big of a fabric and color palette as you like–or it works with a small one too–and you can mix and match the shapes in as many ways as you can think of. Think of this project as one where you can play with fabric and shape all day…which I happily did. Or, if you’ve just got a few minutes at the end of each day, you can totally spend those minutes composing, cutting and playing with this on your design wall until you get it to where you want it. (I really like that idea…and might need to do that…)

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

From the beginning, I knew that I wanted to use my new lawns–all of them–plus the coordinating lawn solids. This is a good project for using little bits of many things, and I wanted to be able to see all of my fabrics in one place and in a loose color order that would be as engaging to compose and it would be to see in finished form.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Lawn is one of my favorite things to appliqué with (see two of my Hesperides projects here and here), especially when there is a lot of shape variation and precision. The fineness of the lawn makes creating that edge distinction and combination of shape much easier, plus it’s just so darn soft to sew with.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll notice that the background fabric is not a lawn, instead it is a piece from Euclid. I love appliquéing with linen too, and here, it makes the perfect backing. The sturdiness of the linen/cotton blend makes it a very supportive backing, and the natural color allows both light and dark fabrics to pop.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

So yeah. That’s my Wildabon quilt. If you like color, fabric and shape, then there’s a good chance you can have some fun with this one too. Since I had such a good time making this one, it’s no surprise that I’ve made more Wildabon things, but you’ll have to stay tuned for those in future posts.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Huge thanks to Leah for working with me on this project!

Friedlander Lawn coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m excited to see what you all do with it too.

Pattern : Wildabon

Fabrics : Friedlander Lawn and coordinating Cambridge solids (which are Lipstick, Peach, Gold, Smoke, Aqua, Charcoal, Blue, Lagoon) for the appliqué, Euclid for the backing, Friedlander for the binding

(BTW, I’m seeing some lovely kits popping up in lots of places like herehere, here, here, and here–for any Aussies)

Friedlander Lawn precuts . Carolyn Friedlander

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