Tag Archives | purses

Wildabon Market Tote.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes (/most of the time) I get stuck on an idea that I can’t wait to see through. This Wildabon Market Tote is one of them.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Wildabon has been such a fun project in every way, and I’ve been eager to appliqué it on to just about everything. Here’s my Wildabon Market Tote, aka a mashup of Anna Graham’s Market Tote (from her book, Handmade Style) and the designs from my Wildabon pattern with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

With so many designs in the pattern, I like that you can pull one motif out and play with it on its own whether it’s in a bag like this or a pillow sham or anything smaller. Plus, if you’re feeling a little overwhelmed by appliqué or taking on something large, this is a great place to start. And, if you’re worrying about handwork and durability, don’t. I’ve been appliquéing on to bags for a while now, and I haven’t had any issues yet. Even if you are a new appliqué-er, quilting over your handwork–just like I did here–adds another layer insurance.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

This was my first time sewing with leather handles, and I have to say that I’m pretty into them after this adventure. I picked these up from Noodlehead’s shop, and they couldn’t have been any easier to work with. Plus, they are so pretty! I love how they kick the project up a notch. Installation wasn’t as scary as I imagined it could be. I used (my new) teflon foot, which made it super easy, as well as polyester thread as it was recommended in the pattern. Next time, I think I’ll be ready to give rivets a try.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s always fun mixing fabrics, and you’ll notice euclid on the outside (which is great, because of its heftiness) with lots of friedlander and friedlander lawn on the inside. I can’t tell you how much fun it is to appliqué with fabrics thick and thin, plus the options for mixing prints…yes, this is how I like to do it!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It was fun getting that print situated on my inside pocket. I love a project where you can play around with your prints.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

When I was positioning the appliqué motif, I also thought about where I’d put the handle, how the side piece would be cut and how it’d wear. I like that the design spills from the top and spreads itself across the side.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this bag can hold a lot! Here it is loaded up with my scrappy collection quilt, which–by the way–I’ve been hand quilting on and off, more off than on lately. But it’s coming together!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

patterns : Wildabon from me and Market Tote from Handmade Style by Anna Graham

fabrics : Euclid, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

zipper : from Zipit

leather handles : from Noodlehead

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

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Liberty and Euclid Petal Pouch.

Another project in the recent Making magazine from Maddermade (same issue with my native coaster project), was this great Petal Pouch pattern by Noodlehead. Of course I had to make one–in Liberty and Euclid.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

It’s such a cute little pouch that comes in two different sizes. This is the larger one.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

I used a Liberty print on the outside and some of my own euclid on the inside.

liberty and euclid petal pouch_carolyn friedlander_6_web

I whipped this guy up pretty quickly one afternoon and gave it to my mom for her birthday. I think pouches like this are handy for just about anyone.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

Unfortunately the issue is sold out, but the good news is that Noodlehead has released a PDF of the pattern on her site. You can find it here.

I plan to make many more.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

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Seabrook bags in Euclid.

It seems like I’ve been seeing good backpacks and bucket bags everywhere this year. Or maybe it’s just that since they’ve been on my mind, I’ve been noticing them more and more. There’s nothing more handy or comfortable than a bag that you can throw over your shoulders and not have to worry about. That, plus the squishy, collapsable-ness makes a bucket bag seem so effortless and useful. When planning out projects for euclid, I knew a good bucket bag needed to be on the list. After reviewing a couple of good options, I decided to move forward with some Seabrook bags in Euclid from Seamwork magazine.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

An interesting thing about all Seamwork patterns is that you can make them in 3 hours or less…so I couldn’t stop with making just one.

First up is euclid and gingham.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Like I mentioned in my Landgate post, many of my euclid projects had me hunting for cording, grommets and other little details, and these Seabrook bags are no different. I really like how the details can dress up a fairly simple project.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

The cording on this one is some parachute cording that I found at a big box store. Apparently making bracelets with this stuff is all the rage, which is good news, because it also makes for excellent cording. And, thanks to its popularity in other applications, it is available in many different colors and patterns. The blue that I used here adds a nice pop of color.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

I also added some lace trim between the top and bottom panels.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is a version with 2 different pieces from euclid on the outside and some carkai on the inside.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Because euclid has a little bit more heft, it’s quite fitting for this project. In neither of these versions did I add any extra interfacing, it’s just the fabric, which is sturdy but still nicely collapsable.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

I really liked the idea of incorporating another piece of trim between the top and bottom panels on the exterior. Here I used this great greenish/gold lace from my stash.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

The cording on this bag is actual cording…like cording from the home dec/upholstery section. Normally you’d cover this stuff with fabric and add to a pillow or something, but I think it also works well on it’s own. It’s nice and plain and simple.

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Seabrook Bags in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

So yeah, these bags were a lot of fun to make. They make great gifts too, and I’ve already given these two away…which means, I’m ready to make another to keep for myself!

Pattern : Seabrook Bag by Seamwork Magazine

Fabrics : Euclid, Carolina Gingham (by Robert Kaufman), Carkai

euclid seabrook bags_19_carolyn friedlander_web

(Photos by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography.)

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