herringbone card tutorial.

In honor of the holiday and the fact that I’m planning to do lots of sewing today, I thought I’d share a fun, little project with you.

herringbone sewn stationery set_carolyn friedlander

Being a card person, I like to keep several tricks up my sleeve for making my own. Most of my tricks are derived from available options and needs. This particular approach is inspired by a large pile of extra quilt blocks I have sitting in a drawer.

drawer of extra blocks

Oh my. Does anyone else end up with lots of extras??

Sewn cards are one way to use them, and here’s how to do it.

Ok, supplies: Nothing crazy here, just some card stock and a leftover from my herringbone runner. This would make a fitting accompaniment if you are giving the runner as a gift OR you can use it for any other purpose. It’ll be pretty and your friends will like it. As far as card stock goes, Paper Source is my fave – all colors and sizes, flat, plain, and simple.

I maintain a stash.

supplies_carolyn friedlander

First things first: I need to do something about my fabric block. It’s larger than my card, and that won’t work. Oddly enough it is exactly twice the length of the card, so I’ll just cut it in half. You could get crazy and cut it up more to use in a different way or on more cards. Your call.

just the right size_carolyn friedlander

It’s now freshly cut in half, and I need to decide which piece goes with which back.

Maybe this way…

cut in half_carolyn friedlander

…or this way?

or should they go this way_carolyn friedlander

Looks good to me.

Now you can pick out your thread. Keep in mind that you will be seeing it from both sides.

This red-orange looks pretty good here.

match thread_carolyn friedlander

And then how does it look with the other?

thread works here too_carolyn friedlander

Contrast is good, and I’m sticking with it. Otherwise you could switch thread.

Before you start sewing, adjust your stitch length to roughly 3.0. I’m using a straight stitch, but you could get crazy and try a zigzag or something. Just don’t choose a stitch that punctures the paper too much. That would weaken your card, and it could fall apart.

That would be bad.

stitch length_carolyn friedlander

Here’s a tip: Don’t worry about pinning the fabric to your paper. That would give you unnecessary holes. I like to hold it in place with my fingers.

Now you are ready to go. Backstitch a little at the beginning and start sewing…

start stitchin_carolyn friedlander

…needle down and pivot at your corners. Keep sewing…

keep stitchin_carolyn friedlander

…until you get to the end. Backstitch to finish. Trim your threads. Repeat with second card, and…

Voila!

stitched cards_carolyn friedlander

And you can also check out the back.

stitched card backs_carolyn friedlander

I like that you can see the stitching. Usually, I’ll use the box or lines as a guide for my message. In this example, I would probably fit the main portion of my note in the box and then use the top portion to create a fun header.

Then you can pick out an envelope for your first card…

envelope and first card_carolyn friedlander

…and one for the second.

envelope and second card_carolyn friedlander

Finally, think about someone special. Write them a note. Drop it in the mail. Repeat over and over.

Real mail is special, especially when you’ve made it yourself.

Have lots of fun and enjoy the people in your life.

Happy Fourth!

grove of one.

Sometimes it takes me a little while to photograph things after I’ve finished them. It’s just something that I tend to put off. Sound familiar to anyone else? Last week, I finally tackled photographing a stack of recently finished projects. Here’s one of them.

 

grove sample with stamped border

 

I made this block (from my Grove pattern) at an event in Vero a few weeks ago. After some thought, I decided that I kind of liked it all by itself, rather than making it into something larger. I’ve been into little projects lately. They are great for trying out new ideas. Plus they make fun little pieces of art–and gifts too.

 

I liked the idea of using my art quilt stamps to create my own fabric for the border. In doing this, I realized one benefit to printing my own fabric was that I did not have to fussy-cut my directional print to work out in my project. I just cut the strips for the border first and then stamped the print in the direction that I wanted them to go. So now they match.

 

stamped fabric in my grove sample

 

I’ve also been really into some straight-ish quilting.

 

stamped fabric in my grove sample

 

And here was the original sans stamping, borders, and quilting. It always amazes me to see how much each part of the process affects the way it looks and feels.

 

orange and green grove quilt block by carolyn friedlander

just got a copy.

 

Hoo-rah!

 

The summer issue of Stitch is here, and I’ve got a project in it. Check it out.

 

stitch magazine 2012

carolyn friedlander button bling rings in the table of contents

button bling rings by carolyn friedlander in stitch magazine

 

Fabric rings with vintage buttons–exactly my kind of bling. I’ve never been much of a shiny and/or serious jewelry type person, especially when it comes to rings. Wood versions have been my go-to, but the tides might be changing with these little guys. Plus, it’s always more fun to make things to your own liking. And who doesn’t have a small stash of enticing buttons just waiting for the right project?

 

These rings take no time (or supplies, really) to make. I could probably find enough fabric to make one in my waste basket. I guess that’s why I made 5 samples rather than the two they asked for…You might say they are addictive.

 

Fast and satisfying. Hope others like it too!

 

Get your copy here or here.

 

 

some weekend sewing, mini Sunrise style.

 

Last week, I came across some miniMINI Sunrise blocks (included in my Sunrise pattern) that I’d made for Quilt Market, and I decided that making some more would make for a perfect bit of weekend sewing.

 

It started kinda like this…
fabric strips

 

and ended like this.

 

miniMINI sunrise quilt project

 

It was fun. But now I need to take care of this.

 

miniMINI sunrise mess

 

It always gets a little messy.

Next step, sew together and maybe add a border or two.

 

ps. big THANKS to Bolt for picking up my patterns!