Eads Quilt Along #8: Layout Play and Borders.

Eads Quilt Along #8: Layout Play and Borders.

Even when you’re working with just 1 block, there is so much you can do when it comes to layout. Last week, we mixed things up by just moving the blocks around. Doing that not only changes the scenery, but it is also a great way to start playing with your layout and thinking about how your pieces can work together in different ways.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

When it comes to borders, I love them. They can be an area of rest, or they can be an area to showcase some quilting or a special fabric–they can do a lot! In my first Eads, I knew that I wanted the block design to go edge-to-edge, which meant no official border. Despite that, I couldn’t help but think about how I could bring the idea of one in even though I wasn’t actually going to have one. If you take a look at my Eads, you’ll notice a chunk of red/orangey blocks–those were the result of my longing for a border. I was (still am) enticed by the idea of less-contrasting blocks that can be grouped together to become a border.

In the end, I didn’t group my red/orangey blocks into a tight row. I liked the idea of them being less formal and more integrated into the quilt which is why I grouped them the way that I did.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Having said that, with the next version, the idea of a more formal border created by the blocks is something I still think about. I’m not sure if it’ll happen in the end, I’m basically just going with the flow on this one, but it’s an idea that I wanted to throw out to you in case you’re someone who sometimes longs for borders like I do.

Here are the blocks for the week.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

I jumped into that green piece from carkai and finished up the black piece from doe–both pieces from my initial fabric pull. There’s also a print from friedlander and then more UPPERCASE and back to some Lotta.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

SomeĀ euclid was added in to continue on the linen/natural/texture-y trend that I seem to be into.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

Do you look forward to finishing new blocks just to see how they fit into the whole? I really do. I find it to be a satisfying end to a sewing session to find places for the new blocks.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

Shuffling things around last week sort of opened the box on moving things around, so it was hard not to get into too much of that this week.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

I also kept thinking about how crazy my sewing area is looking…

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

I really wanted to continue moving things around, but there are other things to be done, and I think I’ll leave most of the major layout-ing until the end when I have all of my blocks complete.

Eads QAL 8 . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ Blocks don’t have to just be blocks. They can act as borders, delineators or blenders depending on their placement in the overall layout as well as on the fabrics that you choose for them.

+ Are you having fun or getting a little stressed out? Visually, things were getting a little too cluttered for me, not only because I have so many blocks, but also because they are really outgrowing the area, so I simply stacked some of them, and I may stack more. I just needed a little more breathing space on the design wall.

+ As a continuation from the note above, don’t pin all of your blocks on the wall at once. Instead, focus on smaller groupings that you can change out regularly. Not only will this keep things looking fresh, but the changing scenery will make you think of your project in new ways.

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Ebb sham in Friedlander fabrics.

While compiling my newsletter last week, I realized that I never shared this Ebb sham in Friedlander fabrics that I made awhile back.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

I love making pillow shams for so many reasons. They make great gifts, they are the perfectly sized project for trying something new (i.e. new combo of fabrics, new technique, etc.) and they are a great way to spruce up some part of your house.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

With this guy, I wanted to play around with some of the pieces in my friedlander collection, along with some euclid for the background.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Linen makes an excellent background because it’s sturdy.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Sometimes I quilt pillow shams, and other times I don’t. I think it can work either way. But I do like to kick things up a notch by adding piping. Here I used a piece from friedlander lawn. Lawn is really great to use as cording and trim. Its fine-ness makes it super easy to maneuver around corners and edges without adding much bulk.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

The back panels were also a great place to make use of this larger print in the collection.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

If you haven’t made a pillow sham before, give it a try. They are such a satisfying and fun project to make.

+ pattern: Ebb (sham size is included in the instructions)

+ fabrics: Friedlander, Friedlander Lawn and Euclid

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

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Eads Quilt Along #7: It’s time for a shuffle.

Eads Quilt Along #7: It’s time for a shuffle.

While it’s been fun looking at this guy, I’ve been feeling the urge for a shuffle. Mixing things up can be a great thing, and after 6 weeks, I figured a change of scenery could do me some good. (For anyone counting the blocks, I am missing some, which I only realized after taking the pictures. They’ll get added back in a future sewing session.)

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

But to start–and to back up a bit–I pulled some fabrics for the week. To be clear, I’m not totally consistent on how I do this. Sometimes I’ll grab fabrics as I make blocks, and other times I’ll grab fabrics and map out the pairs ahead of time for an entire stack of blocks. This week I went for the latter approach.

My starting point was a lighter piece of Homespun (to continue with the Homespun enthusiasm from last week) to which I added some Leah Duncan and some fabric from my Doe and Friedlander collections.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s soft, but with some spunk.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

I like them. And the clean slate-ness of this felt kind of liberating. (Especially after an intense few weeks of deadline sewing…)

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

This batch of blocks is soft, warm, kinda wild and textured. I’m in to it.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

After making these 10, I started to play with everything else.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

It was easier to play with these guys on the floor, so I moved the foam core to another side of the room–a benefit of movable design walls.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

The great thing about this was that I started to see the blocks and their relationships in new ways.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

One happy accident was the greens and golds. I never would have thought to put these guys together, but it’s now one of my favorite things.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ Take everything down from the design wall and mix it up. See what happens when you give yourself a new perspective.

+ Take a picture before you take everything down so that you can go back to where you started if you decide that you really want to. OR, the photo will serve as a good reminder of the evolution of your project. Looking back reminds you of how far you’ve come!

+ Pay attention to accidental neighbors. This is where I always find fun stuff.

Eads QAL 7 . Carolyn Friedlander

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