Archive | Featured on Home

Tangelo Quilt in Harriot.

This Tangelo Quilt in Harriot was a fun one to see come together.

Tangelo Quilt in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve always wanted to make another Tangelo, and I really really wanted to make one with Harriot. Tangelo is one of those quilts that can take many different fabrics, colors, whatever and give them a unified purpose. Here the fabrics bring to life each row of triangles in new ways.

The other reason why it was a good fit is because of the fabric and the technique. Tangelo is triangles made easier, meaning they’re paper pieced and therefore do not require any special rulers or perfect starting point. Instead, you can start with your pile of fabrics–which in this case is a mix of screen-printed pieces and yarn-dyed wovens–and start sewing. The paper piecing makes working with this variety of fabrics easier, because the paper helps stabilize them while you’re making the quilt. Win win.

Tangelo Quilt in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I was eager to work in one of the scallop prints from the collection. Here you can see how it creates a few different triangles within the same row. Some are dark blue, some are light blue and some even have a hint of a scallop.

Tangelo Quilt in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

See the little scallop peeking out in this one?

I’m so glad this new Tangelo came together for the Harriot release. My mom, Kathy Friedlander and friend, Ellen Rushman, helped me make rows, and I couldn’t have done it without them.

pattern: Tangelo

fabric(s): Harriot

previous posts on Tangelo: Intro to Tangelo,

Tangelo Quilt in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 0 | Leave a comment


Harriot Wiksten Haoris.

Yes, plural. I made two Harriot Wiksten Haoris before Harriot was released into the world. I loved the first one I made so much, that I couldn’t NOT make a second. (And now I’m holding back urges to make more…at least for the time being anyway…)

Harriot Wiksten Haori

There are many good things to say about this pattern. First, it works so well with many different types of fabrics. I’ve seen it made up in silky, drapey stuff as well as heavier, sturdier linens–and it always works!

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

The meatier yarn dye in Harriot is very well suited for the Haori pattern. It has substance, texture and still a little bit of drape. Plus, I love the opportunity to play with the lining options.

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

Everything about the Haori is cozy. From the wide collar to the generous pockets…

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

And the shape is really nice.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I made this blue one first. It is the Mid length, and I love it.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

Next, I just had to try the Short length.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

This version is in the sage-y green from Harriot with a little more flash in the lining.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I have been wearing this one a lot. It’s a perfect layer for the Florida “winter” (if it cools off enough), and I wore it constantly last week when I was in Northern California.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I didn’t make any modifications to either version, although I did opt for matching the collar that you see to the Main fabric (rather than having the lining show). I’m sure this depends on your personal preference and the fabric that you’re using. I also didn’t interface the collar as mentioned in the pattern. The thicker fabric from Harriot had all of the substance that I wanted, and so I ended up saving myself that step and those extra supplies.

If you have a serger and like using it, this is a great project for it. I serged the whole thing, except in places where you need to do some top stitching. The serger made it a fun and clean way to put it all together.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I am such a fan.

pattern: Wiksten Haori (Mid and Short Lengths)

fabric: Harriot

Comments: 2 | Leave a comment


A Batch Of Thread Catchers.

I did manage to crank out a batch of thread catchers for some of my local sewing buds. I’ve been wanting to do this for some time, and our holiday get together gave me the perfect excuse to do it.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Even with a lot going on, I was very glad to steal away a few hours to make a little something for each of them. And, most of the fabrics were leftovers from other recent projects that were sitting in piles needing to get sorted, so it was kind of like tidying the studio a bit too!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I used this tutorial to make a regular and a mini for each person. I’ve updated the tutorial to include both sizes. (Scroll down to the bottom of the tutorial for the adjustments to make the mini.) Personally, I like having both size options, because sometimes you need more and sometimes you need less. They each satisfy two different needs.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I probably could have made myself a couple more while I was at it, because I didn’t seem to have one handy a few times this week when I could have used one. Does anyone else end up with makeshift thread piles or is it just me?

Next time…

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

These guys are pretty speedy, and I really liked pairing up the different fabric combinations. In the end I let everyone pick their own. It was fun to see who picked what–many lined up as I thought they might and others surprised me a bit.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Lots of thread catchers!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Comments: 4 | Leave a comment


Site by Spunmonkey.