Archive | loving

Quick Thread Catcher Tutorial.

quick thread catcher tutorial . carolyn friedlander

Yesterday I mentioned that I liked traveling with a little thread catcher, and so today I’m posting a quick thread catcher tutorial. This is based on one given to me by the sweet owners of the Janie Lou quilt shop in St Louis, Missouri. What I really like about it is that it folds up nice and flat, which makes it easy to bring with me anywhere. Plus, it’s silly how quick and easy it is to put together. I’ll be making many more of these for my sewing buds…

Materials:

+ Exterior Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ Lining Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ (optional) Interfacing – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″ applied to Exterior.

Fabric/Interfacing Note: Neither of the thread catchers shown in this tutorial are interfaced. The one that I was given (above) has a sturdier canvas on the exterior. It’s nice. The one (outlined below) in this tutorial is made from un-interfaced quilting cotton for both the exterior and lining. I was mostly curious to see how it would turn out, and it’s surprisingly structured! I’m very pleased with it and will totally do it this way again. But of course, if you like interfacing, you can always incorporate it into your project.

All seam allowances are 1/4″. While I’m using my serger in this tutorial, you can just as well use your sewing machine. All raw edges will be enclosed, except where noted below.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold in half (RIGHT sides TOGETHER) so that short edges are aligned. In the photo below, my short sides are at the top, and the fold is on the bottom. Do this and the following for both the exterior and lining panels.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Pin (if desired) and stitch along the sides.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Create a boxed corner by pinching side seam to bottom fold on each side.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Mark a line 1 3/4″ from pointed edge. Stitch along this line.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Turn exterior (RIGHT side OUT).

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Place lining inside exterior, aligning side seams. Pin in place (if desired). Tip: Alternate the direction of the side seams when you match them up. This will make things less-bulky.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Stitch along top edge. A serger will finish this edge as you stitch, but if you’re using a sewing machine, you can use a zigzag stitch to finish it. Or, if you want to bind it, you can totally do that too, but since the top is folded, it isn’t super critical.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold the top down a couple of times, and you’re good to go!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

I hope you enjoy yours as much as I’ve enjoyed mine!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 4 | Leave a comment


Traverse Bag in Gleaned.

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

Making a Traverse Bag (pattern by Noodlehead) was a long time coming. Ever since releasing the pattern earlier this year, it had been on my list. Before the hurricane, before the rush of Quilt Market and most definitely before the start of the holidays, I managed to do it. Here’s a look at my Traverse Bag in gleaned.

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

It’s always fun picking fabrics for a bag, but I know that this part can also be daunting! I knew that I wanted to use the camo print from gleaned as the main print, and so it was just a matter of figuring out what else to use, including the hardware–that needed to be picked too! Noodlehead has special hardware kits available (see here), which is exactly what I used. It made it SO easy. She finds great pieces and offers a variety of color and finish options. Win win.

As for the other fabrics, I used some of the new coordinates from my architextures collection, including one of the new text prints as the lining. There’s something about light-colored linings in bags that I’m always interested in using. Lighter linings make it much easier to see inside when you’re inevitably going to grab something, not that there are too many places for things to hide in this bag–a major pro!

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

Also on the inside, I used one of the prints from gleaned that has a special edge treatment. Special edge designs are fun to work with, and here you can see how I fussy cut it for the inside pocket.

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

I also took advantage of that in the front flap–fun stuff!

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

This bag is a thoughtfully compact bag by design. There are 2 size options in the pattern, and both are geared toward keeping things light and tight. This size is the smallest option–the mini. It’s great being able to carry all of your necessities, while keeping them organized. Plus, I like that it’s a crossbody style which means it’s hands free.

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

As far as pockets and compartments, there’s a snapped pocket on the front, a larger-zippered section with small slip pocket inside, and then even a small zippered pocket on the back. For a bag that isn’t super big, there are plenty of spaces to keep your stuff tidy.

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

The front flap is also the perfect spot to incorporate some cording. I’m always a fan of that. If you get the hardware set from Noodlehead, a strip of cording is included. How handy!

Traverse Bag in Gleaned Fabric

Traverse Bag in Gleaned FabricPattern : Traverse Bag by Noodlehead, mini size

Hardware : Here (from Noodlehead)

Fabric : Gleaned and new Architextures coordinates

(photos by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography)

Comments: 1 | Leave a comment


Aurifil Thread Sets in the Shop.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

Thread makes such a difference in a project. I’ve known this to be true as soon as I made the switch from using whatever random thread that I had on hand to making a deliberate effort to use what wouldn’t cause me problems. I know, that sounds super obvious, but as I think we’ve all experienced, you don’t really know this until you’ve experienced it first hand.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

After trying many types and brands of thread, I landed on using Aurifil for most everything. I discovered that I had fewer problems with tension, thread breaking and overall consistency.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

When the opportunity to put together some sets came up, it was an easy decision, because it was already what I was using. My first sets came out a few years ago, and more recently, I’ve been able to put together some new ones, which I’ve finally added to my shop.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

The 50wt cotton is my go-to for

+ basting (in appliqué)

+ any piecing (by machine or sometimes hand–although I’ll hand piece with 80wt also)

+ machine quilting

It’s reliably consistent, strong and the colors are beautiful. With the sets, I also try to cover a useful range that can work with many different projects, coordinate with my fabrics and just be pretty to look at.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

There’s a larger set with 12 big spools, as well as a smaller set with 10 small spools.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

I basically live off of the larger spools, and the smaller spools I find to be handy for travel–or if you’re just wanting a taste of a certain color.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

For appliqué, I’m a MASSIVE fan of the 80wt cotton. I do a lot of appliqué, and it is always what I use. Always.

In fact, I was able to test their 80wt thread while it was under development, and I was so hooked that I basically refused to use anything else even if the color didn’t work. At the time, I only had 1 color–which was similar to the cream (top, right) in the pic below, and in using it, I realized that the fineness meant fewer colors could serve a wider range of needs.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

It’s great, because you get the benefits of it being all cotton, but a thinness that totally disappears into your project.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread AppliquéUsing a thinner thread makes you appear more skillful, because your stitches disappear more easily while still being quite strong.

I thought really hard about this set, because I wanted the most essential range of colors that would be ready for most any project you were working on. With handwork being so portable, the smaller spool is great, and having the right mix of colors is even better.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

And by the way, I recently discovered that the smaller petal pouch (by Noodlehead) fits these spools perfectly!

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

This last set is a really fun one–it’s a combination of 12wt cotton and aurifloss.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

The 12wt cotton is great for big stitch quilting. I love the look and feel of textured, colorful big stitches, and this thread just glides through a project.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

The Aurifloss is great for embroidery or other embellishments, like what I did here on some Crew pincushions.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

All of these sets can be found in the shop, and all of them come with free domestic and discounted international shipping.

Happy sewing!

Comments: 0 | Leave a comment


Site by Spunmonkey.