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Aurifil Thread Sets in the Shop.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

Thread makes such a difference in a project. I’ve known this to be true as soon as I made the switch from using whatever random thread that I had on hand to making a deliberate effort to use what wouldn’t cause me problems. I know, that sounds super obvious, but as I think we’ve all experienced, you don’t really know this until you’ve experienced it first hand.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

After trying many types and brands of thread, I landed on using Aurifil for most everything. I discovered that I had fewer problems with tension, thread breaking and overall consistency.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

When the opportunity to put together some sets came up, it was an easy decision, because it was already what I was using. My first sets came out a few years ago, and more recently, I’ve been able to put together some new ones, which I’ve finally added to my shop.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

The 50wt cotton is my go-to for

+ basting (in appliqué)

+ any piecing (by machine or sometimes hand–although I’ll hand piece with 80wt also)

+ machine quilting

It’s reliably consistent, strong and the colors are beautiful. With the sets, I also try to cover a useful range that can work with many different projects, coordinate with my fabrics and just be pretty to look at.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

There’s a larger set with 12 big spools, as well as a smaller set with 10 small spools.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

I basically live off of the larger spools, and the smaller spools I find to be handy for travel–or if you’re just wanting a taste of a certain color.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

For appliqué, I’m a MASSIVE fan of the 80wt cotton. I do a lot of appliqué, and it is always what I use. Always.

In fact, I was able to test their 80wt thread while it was under development, and I was so hooked that I basically refused to use anything else even if the color didn’t work. At the time, I only had 1 color–which was similar to the cream (top, right) in the pic below, and in using it, I realized that the fineness meant fewer colors could serve a wider range of needs.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

It’s great, because you get the benefits of it being all cotton, but a thinness that totally disappears into your project.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread AppliquéUsing a thinner thread makes you appear more skillful, because your stitches disappear more easily while still being quite strong.

I thought really hard about this set, because I wanted the most essential range of colors that would be ready for most any project you were working on. With handwork being so portable, the smaller spool is great, and having the right mix of colors is even better.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

And by the way, I recently discovered that the smaller petal pouch (by Noodlehead) fits these spools perfectly!

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

This last set is a really fun one–it’s a combination of 12wt cotton and aurifloss.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

The 12wt cotton is great for big stitch quilting. I love the look and feel of textured, colorful big stitches, and this thread just glides through a project.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

The Aurifloss is great for embroidery or other embellishments, like what I did here on some Crew pincushions.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

All of these sets can be found in the shop, and all of them come with free domestic and discounted international shipping.

Happy sewing!

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Weekend Thanks (coupon) and Shop News.

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn FriedlanderHi! I hope you’ve had a wonderful Thanksgiving–if that’s something you celebrate. Otherwise, I hope you’re settling in to the end-of-the-year season in whatever form that takes on. For me, this time of year is perfect for reflecting on everything that’s happened so far, figure out what I’d like to accomplish in the remaining weeks, and make plans for what to do in the New Year.

Naturally with it being Thanksgiving, I’m also thinking about gratitude, and I thought it’d be a perfect time to say thank you with a shop coupon. From now through Monday, use the code THANKyou2017 for 20% off digital patterns.

I also have some new things in the shop to note.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

First up is some of my Aurifil thread sets here.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 50wt Thread Favorites

Included are 50wt cotton options in both small and large spools, plus my favorite–and most essential–appliqué set (80wt cotton), as well as a fun big stitch/aurifloss set that is perfect for all kinds of finishing touches that are both decorative and functional.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

Aurifil 12wt Aurifloss Set . Carolyn Friedlander

Also new to the shop are my very favorite Kai scissors. Because of how important good scissors are in a project, I decided to offer up a few to you. I’m always being asked what I use, and here they are!

Kai Scissors

In each of the listings, I made sure to note what I use each pair for so you’ll have more of an idea.

Kai 7170 ScissorHappy Black Friday, and happy beginnings to the holiday season!

+ 20% off PDF patterns through Monday 11/27 with code THANKyou2017

+ Kai scissors and Aurifil thread now in the shop

+ Free domestic and discounted international shipping on Kai and Aurifil products

Kai 5100 Scissor

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Fabric napkins for the win.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric napkins for the win. Are you a cloth-napkin user? I am and have been since college. In fact, I’ve been using the same cloth napkins since college, which means my cloth napkins are quite old. So old, that every time I find myself folding and putting them away I’m thinking–I should really make some new napkins… It’s always been one of those “some day” tasks, but finally, I’ve made myself some new fabric napkins, and it basically took no time at all.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

This is hardly even a weekend project. For me it was a I-need-a-break/distraction-to-feel-productive-for-maybe-an-hour kind of project. And boy are they.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Even though the colors look curated, they are the result of pulling fabric in order off my shelf, which I guess is curated…and in color order, but still. It was an easy effort. I grabbed and cut fabrics until I felt done grabbing and cutting, which apparently was 9 pieces.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

To back up a bit, the idea came after seeing these from Purl. For anyone wanting to follow a tutorial, you can totally follow that one, it’s good. On mine, I simplified the steps a bit and changed the overall size.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I first made a snip at 19″ with scissors and then ripped the full width of fabric, which means that my fabric was 19″ x width-of-fabric (44″ish in this case). Ripping the fabric ensures you’re following the grain of the fabric, which does make a difference when you’re planning for frayed edges. (Plus, ripping fabric is a surprisingly fun task.)

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I then threw those 19″ strips (ripped on 1 side) into the washing machine and dryer before ripping them into 18″ squares, by making a snip at 18″ and ripping each side, basing all subsequent sides on the first ripped side.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

After getting all of the squares made, I frayed the edges, but unlike the tutorial, I didn’t do an overall stitch around the sides. I figure the fraying will be fine. After you fray some edges, you start to see how unlikely more of it will be from becoming more un-frayed. Or, if it does become crazy in the future, I can always add some stitching. No prob.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Of course, some stitching could be a lovely decorative element if using a contrasting thread or interesting stitch. It all depends on the look you’re going for! In my case, it was a no-muss, no-fuss situation. I like the looseness.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I know that some people have some concerns with fabric napkins. First, to address the wrinkle issue, these napkins haven’t been ironed at all. I took them straight from the dryer, ripped to size and then just hand smoothed them before this photo shoot. Not bad, huh?

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

And this was just the first wash, they’ll get softer and softer with each wash. If you’re into ironing or have some guests to impress, you could certainly give them a good press before setting them out. Otherwise, I find them to be totally acceptable straight from the dryer.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Another question about fabric napkins has to do with stains. This is a good question since you will be using them around food. There are a few ways you could look at it. First, if you’re really concerned about stains, you could just pick out really dark and/or busy fabrics that could easily camo some stains. Second, I haven’t noticed too many stains that really stick in my experience with cloth napkins, and I’ve been a cloth napkin user for almost 15 years. Third, if you do happen to get a pesky and unrelenting stain, just make a new one! This is a low-commitment project that only gets better and more exciting with new fabric.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabrics included are from my collections, friedlander, architextures and doe.

Yay for fabric napkins!

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T-Shirt patterns for everyone else.

I recently posted some of my favorite t-shirt patterns for women, but here are some t-shirt patterns for everyone else. When I was looking for patterns to use with blake, I found there to be a TON of women’s patterns, quite a bit of stuff for kids and not so much for men. I guess that isn’t too surprising, but that makes it all the more worthwhile to share my findings!

For men, we’ve got Eugene by Seamwork, a classic henley-style t-shirt.

Seamwork Eugene in Blake knit

Seamwork Eugene in Blake knit

The men’s Metro T-shirt by Liesl + Co is a great, classic t-shirt.

Men's Metro T-Shirt in Blake Knit

Men's Metro T-Shirt in Blake Knit

There’s also Paxson by Seamwork, which is a raglan-style t-shirt for men, but it’s currently under construction and not available. It’ll be nice when it is available, because a basic raglan pattern for men is hard to find. I’ve looked…

For kids, there are so many good ones. Here are some of my favorites.

The Field Trip Raglan by Oliver + S, is a great raglan option for boys–with a pocket.

Field Trip Raglan t-shirt in Blake Knit

Field Trip Raglan t-shirt in Blake KnitThe School Bus t-shirt by Oliver + S is a great basic t-shirt pattern for boys.

I added contrasting cuffs and a pocket to this one. The pocket was quite the highlight for my nephew. Not pictured, but within minutes of putting it on, he was delighted to discover that he could fit his entire hand in the pocket. Score!

Schoolbus T-Shirt in Blake Knit

Another kid’s t-shirt that I haven’t tried, but would like to try is the Flashback Skinny Tee by Made By Rae. It’s really cute, and I like the wider cuffs.

Flashback Skinny Tee

The Modern Layette Set by Green Bee Patterns has some good knit options. I’ve been wanting to try this out, especially after seeing this set that Anna Graham sewed up.

Modern Layette Set by Green Bee Patterns

The Lunch Box Tee by Oliver + S is one that I’m hoping to whip up this week since my niece is coming to visit.

Lunch Box Tee

I think a striped version of the short-sleeve length would be very cute in some blake. (And the culottes might need to be made too–so cute!)

Lunch Box Tee

I really enjoyed the feedback and comments that I received after my last t-shirt post. You guys pointed me towards some good stuff to check out, including the Sewaholic’s Renfrew Top, Hey June’s Lane Raglan and Love Notions’s Laundry Day Tee (available in sizes XS-XXXL).

What other knit patterns are you a fan of?

 

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My favorite t-shirt patterns.

With Blake coming out, I knew I had a good excuse to find the perfect t-shirt pattern. It turns out, there are many.

To be completely honest, I was never much of a t-shirt wearer before I started making my own t-shirts. Looking back, it makes total sense. Store-bought t-shirts just never really fit me right. You’d think there would be more leniency with t-shirts given the fact that the stretch is forgiving, but that’s never been the case for me. There’s something about a t-shirt that makes me want a better balance between fit, fabric and cut–even more so than what I desire from woven tops. I’m not sure why. Having said that, I don’t think that sewing your own t-shirt should be scary. In many ways they’re easier to take in and make adjustments to. Plus, there are TONS of good patterns and resources out there, and this list just touches on some of them. Maybe one or some will work for you?

Here are some of my faves.

My first two faves cover two very important bases–a fitted t-shirt and a roomy t-shirt. They are Rio by Seamwork and the Basic Tee by Seamly.

Seamwork Rio . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a Rio in Robert Kaufman speckle cotton jersey. The only alteration made to this pattern was to straighten the hem, rather than do the high/low thing. I wear this speckle version so often that it was the first thing I sewed up with blake.

Rio Tee . Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

Rio Tee . Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

You can see another version of Rio in the Blake Lookbook on the lovely Vanessa.

Rio Tee in Blake Knit

The Basic Tee by Seamly is another favorite. Whereas the Rio is a more fitted tee, the Basic Tee by Seamly is more relaxed and has a pocket.

Seamly Basic Tee in Speckle Jersey

This version is also in Robert Kaufman’s speckle cotton jersey, and I wear it all the time. It’s kind of become my unofficial airport uniform. You’d think that I’d change it up, but I just love this one so much.

Seamly Basic Tee in Speckle JerseyI haven’t made one of these in blake yet, but it’s on the agenda. I made sure to cut some pieces out when I was prepping for Quilt Market. It will be happening…

Next up, we can talk about Jane by Seamwork. This is a pattern I was eager to try, and I’ll admit, I wasn’t thrilled with the fit right off the bat, but after some modifications to the neckline (I lowered it quite a bit) and length (I shortened it quite a bit), I’m very in love with this shirt. (By the way, I was wearing this guy on day 1 of Quilt Market.)

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

I think this type of shirt would be perfect for some fun appliqué or other personalization and detailing. Seamwork did a good job of showing some of those possibilities off.

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

We can’t talk about t-shirts without talking about Grainline’s Linden, which I know, is a sweatshirt…but in the right weight, it is also the perfect t-shirt.

This one (seen in the Blake Lookbook) is View B of the pattern which features short sleeves, shorter bodice length and no sleeve or bodice bindings. It’s really great.

Linden shirt in Blake knit

Linden shirt in Blake knit

A long-sleeved version is pretty great too.

Linden sweatshirt in Blake knit

I love a jersey-weight Linden because it’s perfect for layering. I have several others that I wear often, so it’ll be good to get this one in the rotation.

Linden sweatshirt in Blake knit

Also in the Grainline family is Lark. I don’t have one (yet) in blake, but I’m sure it’ll happen at some point. Lark is fabulous basic t-shirt with tons of handy adaptations available for you with different sleeve lengths, neck lines, cardigan variations, etc.

Oh, and the Hemlock tee by Grainline too! It’s actually a free pattern if you sign up for their newsletter. It’s single-sized–so heads up on that. You’ll maybe need to make some fit adjustments. I made one, but need to take some pics. (In the meantime you can see mine here and here posted by JanieLou.) I LOVE this top and have already been wearing it a lot. As for the fit, I did have to tinker around a bit as the one size that it comes in isn’t my size, but if you have some experience, it’s not too tricky. And knit is forgiving.

Next up is the Wanderlust Tee by Fancy Tiger Crafts. (You can actually watch how to make this on CreativeBug here. Even though I’ve sewn knits many times before, I learned a lot watching this video and others by Fancy Tiger.)

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

This t-shirt is comfy, and I like the style. It features a slightly dropped sleeve (which is a little easier to install if you are fearful of sewing in sleeves) and a curved hem. The version is drafted to be kind of cropped, so I’ve lengthened all versions that I’ve made. This version in blake is maybe the 3rd that I’ve made so far…clearly, I’m a fan of this pattern.

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

What’s nice about any t-shirt is that you can switch up the collar and/or pocket with another fabric for a nice little change of pace. Here’s another Wanderlust Tee doing just that.

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

Hopefully this list isn’t too overwhelming for you. I know that there is a lot out there, which is why I thought it would be useful to report in on some of my findings. Plus, the sheer amount represented here is a testament to how speedy knits can be to sew up. With knit stuff, it’s not uncommon for me to cut out and sew up multiples at once.

Do you have any favorite t-shirt patterns? Please feel free to leave a comment and share!

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SockSacks in Friedlander and Euclid.

I love a good gift-worthy project, and these SockSacks in my Friedlander and Euclid fabrics are some recent gifts that I made after being given one myself.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started when a friend made this one for me.

Sevenberry Sock Sack

I was immediately smitten with the fabrics and quickly fell deeper for it when I realized how perfect it is for transporting a lot of things. Obviously, it’s awesome for knitting–there are two interior sections divided by a zippered pouch. But it also works well as a travel bag for other things–like snacks and tea–both of which I travel with often. The compartments hold what you need, while keeping them divided and sorted nicely. Plus, it’s so darn pretty! (Fabrics in this one that was gifted to me are Sevenberry and London Calling from Robert Kaufman.)

Sevenberry Sock Sack

Since I’ve been loving mine so much, I decided that I needed to make a few more for some friends.

This one has some euclid on the outside…

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of my newest stuff on the inside and at the top

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

A little bit of carkai and more new stuff

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s a better pic inside. You can see the snap tabs, which are really great for keeping your yarn in check. I’m working from 2 skeins with my current knitting project, and the tabs are keeping everything anchored and tangle-free. Yay. Plus, the zippered section. You know that’s handy.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Picking fabrics is always one of my favorite parts. This project is fun for that because there are places large and small, meaning plenty of possibilities for print and color play.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

The other one that I made has this print on the outside, this one at the top, and this and this one the inside.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

I followed the instructions for both without making any changes, including not using interfacing. In general, I like things to have structure, but I also liked the idea of making these first two as instructed to see how I liked the weight. Of course I knew that using Euclid in the first version would give it more structure–and it does, but the quilting-weight-only version works out just as well! It’s a soft bag that isn’t likely to be put under much stress, so it makes sense. I did, however, elect for lawn in both of the drawstring casings. Lawn was used in the version given to me, and I really liked how lightweight it made it. The cord cinches everything up nicely, and while I’m sure quilting weight would work well for that part too, I was eager to embrace using the lawn.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : SockSack by Ramona Rose (I made the largest size, but after making that, I realized the size that I was given is the medium size. Both are nice! I’ll bet the small size is super cute.)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

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Wildabon Quilt with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Want to know one of the most fun things I did in 2016? Easy. It’d have to be my new Wildabon quilt–a collaboration with Leah Duncan. Everything about it was such a delight. To start, I’m a massive Leah Duncan fan. She has a beautiful and distinct style that is all her own. I’ve loved sewing with her fabrics, collecting her goods and just following her work and business as she continues to put out really lovely things. It also doesn’t hurt that she’s a kind and thoughtful person too. (Win win win).

Willow Tanks . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started while sewing with some of Leah’s fabric one weekend. The Willow tank on the right is made with fabric from Leah’s Lore collection with Cloud9. (The fabric on the left is some Nani Iro in case you’re wondering.) While sewing along, I started to wonder what it would be like to appliqué some of those shapes, and I kind of became a little obsessed with the idea. Next, I reached out to Leah to see if she was interested in working together, and she was. Hoo-rah!

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

From working with Leah and her designs in the beginning, to making this project a reality, Wildabon was satisfying from all angles. In terms of the appliqué itself, the 7 different design motifs, all of which range in terms of skill level, shape and size, are really fun to tackle on any sized project. If you’ve appliquéd before (or not), there is enough variety of shape to keep you entertained and challenged.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In terms of fabric and composition, I’ll happily reuse the word satisfying here too, because it fits. While I’m not at all opposed to projects with limited uses of fabric and color–they can be a great challenge–I also love a project where you can use it all.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a project where you can build out as big of a fabric and color palette as you like–or it works with a small one too–and you can mix and match the shapes in as many ways as you can think of. Think of this project as one where you can play with fabric and shape all day…which I happily did. Or, if you’ve just got a few minutes at the end of each day, you can totally spend those minutes composing, cutting and playing with this on your design wall until you get it to where you want it. (I really like that idea…and might need to do that…)

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

From the beginning, I knew that I wanted to use my new lawns–all of them–plus the coordinating lawn solids. This is a good project for using little bits of many things, and I wanted to be able to see all of my fabrics in one place and in a loose color order that would be as engaging to compose and it would be to see in finished form.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Lawn is one of my favorite things to appliqué with (see two of my Hesperides projects here and here), especially when there is a lot of shape variation and precision. The fineness of the lawn makes creating that edge distinction and combination of shape much easier, plus it’s just so darn soft to sew with.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll notice that the background fabric is not a lawn, instead it is a piece from Euclid. I love appliquéing with linen too, and here, it makes the perfect backing. The sturdiness of the linen/cotton blend makes it a very supportive backing, and the natural color allows both light and dark fabrics to pop.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

So yeah. That’s my Wildabon quilt. If you like color, fabric and shape, then there’s a good chance you can have some fun with this one too. Since I had such a good time making this one, it’s no surprise that I’ve made more Wildabon things, but you’ll have to stay tuned for those in future posts.

Wildabon Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Huge thanks to Leah for working with me on this project!

Friedlander Lawn coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m excited to see what you all do with it too.

Pattern : Wildabon

Fabrics : Friedlander Lawn and coordinating Cambridge solids (which are Lipstick, Peach, Gold, Smoke, Aqua, Charcoal, Blue, Lagoon) for the appliqué, Euclid for the backing, Friedlander for the binding

(BTW, I’m seeing some lovely kits popping up in lots of places like herehere, here, here, and here–for any Aussies)

Friedlander Lawn precuts . Carolyn Friedlander

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Fall sewing with Euclid.

I guess it’s getting cooler other places…right? You can’t really tell where I am, but in the spirit of seasons changing and warmer-wardrobes calling, here’s a little bit of fall sewing with Euclid. Bonus, both of these projects are quilty-crossovers. So if you’re wanting a garment project with plenty of quilty familiarity, here you go.

For the record, I’m actually not a fan of looking ahead to cooler temperatures–I prefer the heat–but this time I do have a little more to look forward to, specifically, the cooler-weather goodies that I sewed up waaay earlier this year in Euclid and haven’t gotten a chance to wear. (Note to self: Maybe cool-weather-sewing in Spring is a good idea? It gives you some new pieces to look forward to when you may not be excited about cooler temps otherwise…)

First up, my Quilted Vest in Euclid, (free!) pattern by Purl Soho. Looking at this, reminds me that I still need to sew on my snaps…

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I used wool batting, some architextures in the lining (this one), and machine quilted it. The pattern was relatively easy and straight-forward. Plus, it came together quite quickly.

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Tamarack Jacket in Euclid, pattern by Grainline. It’s a good one! My typical Grainline alteration is to shorten the sleeves a bit, which I did here. Otherwise, no changes were necessary for me. It looks like I also need to sew the closure hooks on this guy…I guess it’s obvious which parts of the project I tend to neglect…

Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like the vest, this is a quilted garment with wool batting, but unlike the vest, this guy is hand quilted. I liked the idea of it being softer and a bit looser. Plus I was able to play with thread color a bit. It’s lined in Cambridge lawn, which makes for the dreamiest of insides. Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Happy fall sewing!!

All photos by Alexis Wharem.

 

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Liberty and Euclid Petal Pouch.

Another project in the recent Making magazine from Maddermade (same issue with my native coaster project), was this great Petal Pouch pattern by Noodlehead. Of course I had to make one–in Liberty and Euclid.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

It’s such a cute little pouch that comes in two different sizes. This is the larger one.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

I used a Liberty print on the outside and some of my own euclid on the inside.

liberty and euclid petal pouch_carolyn friedlander_6_web

I whipped this guy up pretty quickly one afternoon and gave it to my mom for her birthday. I think pouches like this are handy for just about anyone.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

Unfortunately the issue is sold out, but the good news is that Noodlehead has released a PDF of the pattern on her site. You can find it here.

I plan to make many more.

LIberty and Euclid Petal Pouch

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Maddermade Making Magazine.

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

I was delighted to contribute a project to the new Maddermade Making Magazine. It’s such a beautiful, beautiful book with many inspiring projects ranging from knitting to sewing to cooking and much more. The theme for this first issue is flora, a great theme that resulted in some super lovely projects. In addition to that, the photography and styling by Carrie Bostick Hoge of Maddermade could not be any more elegant, enticing or inspiring. It is all so incredibly lovely.

Maddermade Making Magazine

My project, Native Coasters, is a fun weekend project full of color and texture.

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

I liked pairing linear piecing with flora-esque and hand drawn fabrics. I used some new euclid, one of the newer doe pieces, some crosshatch from architexturesNative Coasters in Maddermade Making

and some bold carkai on the back for a nice contrast.

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

I loved playing up the texture in both the fabric substrates, the prints and the quilting/hand tying itself. Small projects like these are perfect for experimenting and having fun.

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

Unfortunately, this first issue is already sold out, BUT the good news is that issue #2 is on the horizon, and I’m sure it’ll be just as worthwhile.

Native Coasters in Maddermade Making

(All photos by Carrie Bostick Hoge.)

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Euclid Open Wide Pouches

These Euclid Open Wide Pouches were a blast to make. In fact, I’ve made several more since making these…and have given them all away. It’s a super good project and a great gift.euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

I found out about this project after someone sweet made one for me. I loved using mine so much that I knew I’d have to find an excuse to make many more. The sizes are great, but the way they stay open and hold so much makes them super functional as well.

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

The pattern is a free tutorial from Noodlehead (found here). There are 3 different sizes and an option to piece the exterior panels. Of course, I went for the route that allowed for more fabric. Because that is fun.

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

I used some of my new Euclid fabric on the outside and some Carkai on the inside.

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

The zippers are all from Zipit.

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

euclid open wide pouches . carolyn friedlander

Pattern : Open Wide Pouch by Noodlehead (free tutorial)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai

(Photos by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography.)

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Euclid Landgate.

Earlier this year, Fancy Tiger Crafts did a Coat Sew-Along on their blog, which was all kinds of fun and very enticing to watch, especially because one of the featured participants, Sara, was making the Landgate by Merchant and Mills. The Landgate had already caught my attention after seeing it and other lovely jackets like it on pinterest. The shape, style and function seemed right up my alley. That spacious and cozy hood plus the drawstring and double pockets (yes, you can have patch and in seam pockets! win win.) were all speaking to me. With Euclid coming out, a Euclid Landgate was an easy add to the project wish list.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

There were many helpful things that I gleaned from the Fancy Tiger sew-along prior to making my own. First, was the mention that some of the printed versions of the pattern (aka the one I was working from) was missing piece #11. Luckily I wasn’t scratching my head too long about it, because Sara gave me the heads up in the first post here. No worries if you’re missing this piece, you can email Merchant and Mills and they will send via email what you need.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up was the sizing–this was a big question mark for me. The pattern is unisex, and according to the size charts on the back, even the XS was going to be quite roomy on me. This isn’t a huge deal, because I like for this type of coat to be spacious enough to wear layers underneath, but I didn’t want to be completely swallowed in a mass of fabric. It was nice being able to see how the sizing worked out in the sew-along, Sara ended up adding side gussets to provide the right fit at the hip. For mine, I didn’t do that, but did end up taking in the side and sleeve seams as well as shortening the overall length and the length of the sleeves by a few inches…but I’m short, so this is a common adaptation for me.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

It was also nice to be able to see some finished versions of the Landgate in a few different places. Prior to the sew-along, it was a bit of an elusive project to find, mostly because I think it was a relatively new release. Here are some good versions that I found helpful to see.

+ Sara’s finished version and blog post here.

+ Another Fancy Tiger participant in this post here–scroll down to see her version with its great modifications or look here on instagram.

+ And then the Landgate hashtag on instagram. You have to scroll around a little bit, but there are definitely some good versions to peruse.

After all of that, I had a much better idea of what to expect when making mine. I knew I needed to gather some supplies–like cording, a zipper, some grommets and snaps–all of which are details that make this project look so polished and interesting. Plus, I needed to figure out the fabric of course.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

You have no idea how many grommets, snaps and cording options I collected prior to making this jacket. To be fair, many of the projects in the Euclid Lookbook required similar items, and so I had my eye out for such things for a while. You’ll notice that when photographed, there are no snaps on the front pockets. Yes, I was scared. It wasn’t that I didn’t have TONS of snaps to use, because I actually did, it’s just that I couldn’t get any of them to work when doing a trial run. I did end up adding some later. These by Dritz are what I could get to work, and you need this tool to make them work. And yes, it’s a nail biter all they way to the finish. Oh, but definitely check out this Noodlehead tutorial for installation. I had it on speed dial.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

Grommets were another challenge. I found some that came in great colors, but I could not get them to work. In the end, it was this kind by Dritz with the tool included that seemed to be most successful.

As for cording, I had many options but made my own from a piece of Euclid. It seemed like the right fit, and Seamwork has a great tutorial for making your own as well as installing grommets here.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

The zipper was one I had on hand from Zipit. There was nothing too crazy about the install. Everything came together pretty easily, and in fact, I found the construction of the zipper guard, yoke and hood to be very smart. Everything came together nicely and finished well.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll notice I used a splash of carkai in the zipper guard and hood facing. I like the added color and interest.

I really enjoyed the planning and research for this project, it’s engaging construction and the added challenge and intrigue of the detailing. Now that it’s finished, I’m eager to wear it when the weather is right.

Euclid Landgate . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : The Landgate by Merchant and Mills

Fabrics : Euclid and a splash of Carkai

Notions : Grommets, Zipper, Snaps (not shown but added later), custom Euclid cording (tutorial here)

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