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Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

For the Harriot release, I tried out a couple of new bag patterns. First up is the String Bag pattern by Green Pepper Patterns–a pattern company that I’ve mostly seen at Joann. They have a huge variety of designs, and I was curious to give one a try.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

On the String Bag pattern, I made the Small size, which is actually a pretty handy size. I didn’t want one that was too big or too small, maybe one that could hold a pair of shoes for going to the gym. This is the perfect size for that, and I love that it is fully lined.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing that I really liked about this design was the front, zippered pocket. It gave me an opportunity to play with and feature the scallop.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

This gray version is the most subtle of the scallops, and I like the results, especially paired with the brown zipper and drawstring.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

I will admit that the instructions were a little hairy at times. If you’re new to making bags, there were a few parts that weren’t the clearest, and I do remember tweaking a few aspects to suit my taste. But in the end, I’m pleased with the outcome.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up are a couple of versions of another pattern that I wanted to try, the Finch Bucket Tote by Stitch Mischief. I’ve been doing a little bit of knitting lately, and this seemed like a worthwhile project to check out.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I made two versions, mostly because I couldn’t decide on just one!

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Both make use of a couple of the different yarn dyed wovens in the collection as well as some screenprints.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I always like a bag that has lots of fabric opportunities as well as extra details like the corded drawstring and webbing strap on this one.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

The inside of the bag has a nice, flat bottom, and the sides feature a wrap-around pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

On the other version, I used the scallop for the pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Even though the finished size for these bags is clearly listed, they still seemed to surprise me a bit by how big they are. They are a little too big if you’re knitting socks, but easily large enough for a sweater or any other big project you have in the works.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

There we go! A few new bags, and a couple of new patterns checked off my list.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

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Harriot Pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers.

I’m a big fan of Aneela Hoey’s sewing patterns, and I loved getting a chance to make a couple of Harriot pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers: Pretty Cases, Boxes, Pouches, Pincushions & More–her book.

Harriot Pouches

First up is the See-It-All Pouch. I love this pouch. A friend made me one a while ago, and I always pull for it when packing (and storing) a hand-sewing project. It packs easily into my backpack and holds everything I need.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

The clear vinyl front gives you a great opportunity to show off your project and/or some fabric. In this case, I thought it’d be fun to show off the scallop.

Harriot Pouches

I used the meatier woven for the back, and the stripe for the binding. There’s something fun about bias-striped binding.

Harriot Pouches

It doesn’t take up much space, but I can still pack a block or two, thread, scissors, thread gloss and be ready to sew.

Harriot Pouches

Next up is the Two-In-One Case. This pouch is neat because it folds in half and snaps closed.

Harriot Pouches

When opened, there are two zippered, clear pouches. This makes it easy to see what you have, and it gives you another spot to show off some fabric or whatever you’re working on.

Harriot Pouches

I like the tidy size and have found it to hold just what you need as well. I’d really like to make some for my nephews and niece. I think they’d be great for storing colored pencils, crayons, and lots of their creative goodies too.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

Installing snaps has been hit or miss for me in the past, but lately I’ve been having good success with these plastic ones.

Harriot Pouches

Here are two new pouches in Harriot.

Patterns: See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case, both found in Stitched Sewing Organizers by Aneela Hoey.

Fabric: Harriot

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Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

My Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup are some new favorites for sure.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

We’ll start with the bolero vest. The pattern is in Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara. It’s a Japanese sewing pattern book that has been translated into English.

Bolero Vest in Casual Sweet Clothes Book

I LOVE the trim detail on the version in the book, but after looking and not finding anything good I decided to take matters into my own hands. Sometimes not having the right option forces you to creatively discover a new one!

Insert the idea to appliqué some shapes from my Hunt pattern onto the back. I love how these shapes work together. This Bolero is such a good canvas.

After deciding on my color palette, the next decision was to figure out the shape placement. The great thing about appliqué is that you can move shapes around very easily to see what you like before making the final attachment. I cut out my shapes first and auditioned them in a few different spots before deciding on this one. I like the way they echo the neckline while breaking up the proportions in a nice way on the back. Plus, you’re able to get a good feel for the overall appliqué motif.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also fun about appliquéing a project like this is that there is less of it than you’d need on a full project. It can move along fairly quickly, while providing a nice impact. I did appliqué them by hand, but you could totally add them via the machine and/or something fusible.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

The vest isn’t lined, which made me pay closer attention to having clean-ish starts and stops, because I knew you’d be able to see them on the inside. Of course, if you didn’t want to concern yourself with this, it would be very easy to line this vest so you wouldn’t have to!

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I got a little fancy (and fussy) with my facings. I managed to get a bit of the scallop from the fabric in there, and I also spiced things up with some neon serger thread.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Tool Tip – remember this handy seam wheel set I mentioned in the Hunt Harriot post? The 3/8″ wheel made adding in the seam allowance to the Bolero pattern a complete breeze. While this book is translated into English, the pattern pieces do not include any seam allowances. You’ll want to add them in yourself.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the buttonup, I used the Grainline Archer with the Popover variation, which I LOVE. It’s such a great pattern.

The yarn dye that I chose from Harriot is super soft and the perfect weight for a buttonup. It is a dream to wear, and I love how versatile the color and pattern will be for mixing/matching/layering with other stuff in my closet. (Plus, I got a little fun with my yoke…)

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made this pattern many times and cannot recommend it enough. It’s a fun sew and an easy wear. I pretty much made it as the pattern is written, but decided at the last-minute to omit the top part of the collar. When I got to that step, I realized I’d not done that before, and so I left the stand as it is. I really like it!

Also, I had some fun with my buttons…

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

Making a buttonup can highlight your button stash–bountiful or lacking. In this case, I discovered that while I have been doing a good job of stockpiling buttonup options, my black department is lacking. I’ll keep that in mind in the future, but luckily I had these fun gingham buttons to use.

There we go!

patterns: Bolero Vest, Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara, Hunt Appliqué Pattern (appliqué on vest) by me, and Archer Buttonup with Popover Variation by Grainline.

template: Hunt quilt template (1/8″ seam allowance)

fabric(s): all from Harriot

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