Archive | Patterns

Sun Hats in Kept

Have you sewn a hat yet? They are really satisfying to make! Hats are one of those projects that might seem out of reach, but when you actually do it they aren’t too bad at all. Just take it one step at a time. Plus I always love making something that I can actually use! Here’s a look at two sun hats in Kept.

Sun Hats in Kept fabrics

Serpentine Hat

Serpentine Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

The Serpentine Hat (pattern by Elbe Textiles) has a wider-brim, and I used two blue prints from my Kept collection. I like that the the more-patterned print peeks out from the inside, but it’s definitely reversible and you can wear it either way.

Serpentine Sun Hat in Kept fabrics
Serpentine Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

Both fabrics are quilting-cotton weight. I used woven fusible interfacing on the darker blue fabric to give it a bit more body. I think the flop factor is just right.

Serpentine Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

It’s fun to think of wearing this with other things I’ve made in ways not too different than putting fabrics together in a quilt. Blue is an easy color for me to mix into my wardrobe.

Serpentine Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

Sorrento Hat

Sorrento Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

The Sorrento Hat (pattern by Elbe Textiles) is more the classic bucket style hat. I hope to get some wear out of this one this summer.

Sorrento Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

The black and charcoal print from Kept makes a statement that still feels put together and easy to pair with an outfit. On the other side is Essex yarn-dyed linen in Graphite. Incorporating the Essex gives it a bit more texture and body. In addition, I used woven, fusible interfacing on the Kept fabric.

sewn Sorrento Sun Hat in Kept fabrics

Both of these sun hats in Kept go together more easily than you’d think. Again, take it one step at a time. I really enjoyed sewing them, and I can’t wait to put them to use this summer.

Kept Hat from the side

Pattern(s): Serpentine Hat by Elbe Textiles, Sorrento Hat by Elbe Textiles. (If you are wanting to make a kid’s hat, the Oliver + S Reversible Bucket Hat pattern is excellent. I’ve made it many times.)

Fabric(s): Kept and Essex Yarn-Dyed Linen in Graphite

Sorrento Sun Hat back in Kept fabrics

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A New Linden Sweatshirt.

Linden Sweatshirt in Sienna
(photo by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography)

I haven’t made a Linden sweatshirt in years. To be fair I’ve made TONS of them, so the need hasn’t really been there. I have so many in all different fabrics and weights, so my bases are mostly covered. But recently I noticed that Robert Kaufman has some new knits. One is a french terry and the other is a french terry fleece–so the fabric you’d expect in a sweatshirt, and the colors are pretty good!

The Spruce and Sienna colors called out to me first, so I got some of each. Both colors are stunning in real life, and I’m excited to put the Spruce to use in something else. But first, the Sienna.

Linden Sweatshirt
(photo by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography)

If you are new to garment sewing and/or new to sewing with knits, the Grainline Linden Sweatshirt is such a perfect place to start. The construction is fairly straight forward, and you don’t have to worry too much about the fit as sweatshirts are on the more forgiving side.

Linden Sweatshirt
(photo by Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography)

I have the Linden dialed in pretty well for me since I’ve made so many. The only modification I make is to shorten the sleeves just an inch or so, which is a consistent modification for me.

To cap it all off, I finally got around to making a pair of sweatpants to match. I used the True Bias Hudson Pant, which I also have squared away after having made a few pairs of them as well. Mainly I adjust the pockets to be more inseam and discrete, which is just a personal preference. Yay for comfy clothes!

Patterns: Linden Sweatshirt by Grainline and Hudson Pant by True Bias

Fabric: Trainers French Terry by Robert Kaufman in Sienna

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Meet, Kept–my newest fabric collection.

Meet kept–my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

kept fabric . carolyn friedlander

I have a new fabric collection, and it is called Kept. This is a small, 12-piece group that has a mellow feel and the ability to go with the flow.

kept fabric . carolyn friedlander

The designs themselves are inspired by collections of things that I have kept. These are things like shapes found in studio stuff, patterns I come across in my daily life and design ideas that roll around in my head. The mix of textures and shape goes from hand drawn and linear to bold and geometric.

kept fabric and kept coordinates . carolyn friedlander

As is usual with a new collection comes a brand-new group of coordinates to go along with it. I love bringing in coordinates that can broaden the character and expand on the possibilities of any collection. These can go alongside Kept or inspire a starting point all their own.

kept fabric and coordinates . carolyn friedlander

I’ve made a variety of projects using my Kept collection and the coordinates to celebrate just some of the creative possibilities. I don’t know about you, but while spending so much time at home during a challenging year I’ve found great comfort in sewing and all of the levels of creativity that it offers. From embracing color, to working with different fabrics, to indulging in projects big and small, practical and comforting–sewing is a very good thing for us to embrace right now.

kept fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

I’ll be sharing more about each of the projects in the coming weeks. If you’d like to see an overview of all of them now, check out this new video that I put together. And let me know what you think!

I made most of the projects above with the big exception of the AMAZING quilted coat and tote. They were made by Brittney Frey (using the Sapporo Coat pattern and Sylvie Tote pattern), and they are just dreamy.

kept fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

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Alder Shirts in Jetty

In an effort to keep things upbeat and to continue sharing projects and inspiration, here’s a look at some recent favorites. An important garment go-to is the Grainline Alder. I love the Alder, because it is easy to wear and it works beautifully in quilting cotton. (Lawn is also a fantastic choice.) Usually garments get made last before a fabric release or quilting event, and so I tend to stick to something that I know will work. Here are two Alder shirts in Jetty.

I have to admit that this print is one I’ve used a LOT of from the collection. It shouldn’t be a surprise that I chose it to become a shirt. As a top, I like that it makes a crisp, white shirt, but with a bright and fun twist. The pale lemon color and the delicate-ness of the artwork makes me happy.

The second Alder top is made using the same design from Jetty but in a different colorway. Blue is a major comfort color for me. It goes with anything.

I guess I’m fairly predictable in what I make and wear. These tops are go-tos for me year round. Mix in a sweater when it’s cool or a pair of shorts when it’s warm. Easy does it.

Also, here’s a tip. When you’re crunched for time, but still want to wear the shirt, leave the armhole finishing for last and throw on a cardigan. I totally pulled this classy move at Quilt Market last October. Haha!

Pattern: Alder Shirtdress by Grainline (I chop off the length and made them tops.)

Fabric: Jetty

Want to see some other Alders? Obviously I can’t stop making this pattern. If you can believe it, there are still a few others that I don’t seem to have photos of.

In carkai (above and below)

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

In Friedlander Lawn

In a cute Japanese cat fabric

In a funky swatch fabric from Spoonflower

In lawn fabric by Liesl Gibson

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A couple of Quilt As You Go Pouches.

I recently made a couple of Quilt As You Go Pouches by Svetlana Sotak from her book That Handmade Touch.

The pattern caught my eye for it’s cute shape and ability to make use of scraps. I’m such a scrap saver, and I love a project that makes good use of them. It feels like I’m cleaning up my sewing space and making something at the same time…because I am!

This is a great scrap project, because it can make use of any scraps big or small. Both pouches are made from some Jetty and Collection CF leftovers that I have in a basket from some other projects.

I generally tried to color each pouch a little differently, because I was making them as gifts for two friends.

For the quilt-as-you-go part, you make up two panels; one for the front and one for the back. I love seeing how the little details that you worked in to each panel get sewn up into the pouch.

This was my first time making one of Svetlana’s patterns, although I’ve admired them for years. It came together really easily, and I don’t think these will be my last!

Pattern: Quilt As You Go Zipper Pouch by Svetlana Sotak in That Handmade Touch

Fabric(s): Jetty and Collection CF

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Rye Quilt Pattern

I LOVE a 2-color quilt, and my new Rye Quilt Pattern is all about that.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Originally inspired by a traditional friendship block that I discovered going through a friend’s old quilting stuff, I was drawn towards a set of geometric shapes that plays with your eye a bit. The design can read many different ways depending on the fabric choose and how you place it. I used prints from Jetty and Collection CF, but you can imagine how different this could play out with bold prints, solids and other choices.

It’s a simple idea, but there’s so much you can do with it.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

To play off the super graphic nature of these shapes, the pattern focuses on being a 2-color project. Of course you can totally use more colors, or you can even scrap it up within the colors. That would be neat! I wanted my first versions and the process described in the pattern to focus on just 2 tones.

In addition to the idea of 2 colors, the pattern also includes 2 different block sizes that can be used separately or together. Above is the larger block making a larger project–it’s easily a throw. The version below uses the smaller block in a smaller project. I also flipped the positions of the light and dark fabric which brings the design to life in a new way. (The pattern has some illustrations showing the differences so you can better visualize your options.)

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s something sophisticated and satisfying about a project like this. After making these two versions, I’ve already made a 3rd (you’ll see it soon or see some peeks here), and I’ve started a 4th. It’s the kind of project that I keep thinking about in my head as I think of new color and fabric combinations to try. I also really want to have a version on my bed. I think it would just look so nice.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it, my new pattern Rye! What do you think about a 2-color quilt?

Pattern: Rye Quilt Pattern (The PDF version is available now, and you can ask about purchasing the print version at your local shop.)

Fabric: Large version uses a print from my Collection CF and Jetty collections (AFR-19933-399, AFR 19067-383). Small version uses 2 prints from Collection CF (AFR-19929-177, AFR-19931-16).

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Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot.

The Noodlehead Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray pattern was screaming out to me to get made up in Harriot, and I finally got around to doing it a little while back.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve been wanting to make some of these adorable baskets ever since Anna first made the batch in Euclid. It’s a beautiful shape with some serious fabric (and functional) possibilities.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I wouldn’t say that I was scared to make them, but I did underestimate how easy they are to make. Maybe it’s worrying about having the right notions and interfacing, but it always seemed like a little bit more of a chore than it actually ended up being. When I finally got around to doing it, I wondered what had taken me so long. (Which might be obvious in how I made 5 of them all in one go…)

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

There are many things I love about this project. First, it’s a very functional make. Who doesn’t have a need for some cute baskets? There are two sizes that can be handy for many different things. They can be useful for you or for someone else if you need to round up a gift.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Second, it’s such a perfect platform for showing off some fabric! Check out the Harriot Scallop in use in this one.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Third, and maybe why I was hesitant, is that this project does require you to incorporate rivets and handles of some type. Prior to these projects, I hadn’t done rivets, and I’ll admit I was a little scared. When I went to add them, I was extremely surprised by how easy they were to install. (I used Anna’s tutorial, which helped a lot. I also tested a rivet on a scrap first.)

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the straps, I could have planned a little better in this department, but it ended up working out well. I had enough leather and leather-like options for all of them, except for the Scallop basket above. I ended up sewing together some fabric handles, which did the trick! It’s nice to know that that works too.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The fact that I made 5 of them in an afternoon should say something about how easy (and addictive) they are, which I really like.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Since making these, I’ve thrown all kinds of things into the baskets. They’re very handy!

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it. My Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot.

fabric: Harriot

pattern: Tiny Treasures Basket And Tray (free!) by Noodlehead

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

For the Harriot release, I tried out a couple of new bag patterns. First up is the String Bag pattern by Green Pepper Patterns–a pattern company that I’ve mostly seen at Joann. They have a huge variety of designs, and I was curious to give one a try.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

On the String Bag pattern, I made the Small size, which is actually a pretty handy size. I didn’t want one that was too big or too small, maybe one that could hold a pair of shoes for going to the gym. This is the perfect size for that, and I love that it is fully lined.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing that I really liked about this design was the front, zippered pocket. It gave me an opportunity to play with and feature the scallop.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

This gray version is the most subtle of the scallops, and I like the results, especially paired with the brown zipper and drawstring.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

I will admit that the instructions were a little hairy at times. If you’re new to making bags, there were a few parts that weren’t the clearest, and I do remember tweaking a few aspects to suit my taste. But in the end, I’m pleased with the outcome.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up are a couple of versions of another pattern that I wanted to try, the Finch Bucket Tote by Stitch Mischief. I’ve been doing a little bit of knitting lately, and this seemed like a worthwhile project to check out.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I made two versions, mostly because I couldn’t decide on just one!

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Both make use of a couple of the different yarn dyed wovens in the collection as well as some screenprints.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I always like a bag that has lots of fabric opportunities as well as extra details like the corded drawstring and webbing strap on this one.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

The inside of the bag has a nice, flat bottom, and the sides feature a wrap-around pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

On the other version, I used the scallop for the pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Even though the finished size for these bags is clearly listed, they still seemed to surprise me a bit by how big they are. They are a little too big if you’re knitting socks, but easily large enough for a sweater or any other big project you have in the works.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

There we go! A few new bags, and a couple of new patterns checked off my list.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

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Harriot Pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers.

I’m a big fan of Aneela Hoey’s sewing patterns, and I loved getting a chance to make a couple of Harriot pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers: Pretty Cases, Boxes, Pouches, Pincushions & More–her book.

Harriot Pouches

First up is the See-It-All Pouch. I love this pouch. A friend made me one a while ago, and I always pull for it when packing (and storing) a hand-sewing project. It packs easily into my backpack and holds everything I need.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

The clear vinyl front gives you a great opportunity to show off your project and/or some fabric. In this case, I thought it’d be fun to show off the scallop.

Harriot Pouches

I used the meatier woven for the back, and the stripe for the binding. There’s something fun about bias-striped binding.

Harriot Pouches

It doesn’t take up much space, but I can still pack a block or two, thread, scissors, thread gloss and be ready to sew.

Harriot Pouches

Next up is the Two-In-One Case. This pouch is neat because it folds in half and snaps closed.

Harriot Pouches

When opened, there are two zippered, clear pouches. This makes it easy to see what you have, and it gives you another spot to show off some fabric or whatever you’re working on.

Harriot Pouches

I like the tidy size and have found it to hold just what you need as well. I’d really like to make some for my nephews and niece. I think they’d be great for storing colored pencils, crayons, and lots of their creative goodies too.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

Installing snaps has been hit or miss for me in the past, but lately I’ve been having good success with these plastic ones.

Harriot Pouches

Here are two new pouches in Harriot.

Patterns: See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case, both found in Stitched Sewing Organizers by Aneela Hoey.

Fabric: Harriot

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Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

My Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup are some new favorites for sure.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

We’ll start with the bolero vest. The pattern is in Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara. It’s a Japanese sewing pattern book that has been translated into English.

Bolero Vest in Casual Sweet Clothes Book

I LOVE the trim detail on the version in the book, but after looking and not finding anything good I decided to take matters into my own hands. Sometimes not having the right option forces you to creatively discover a new one!

Insert the idea to appliqué some shapes from my Hunt pattern onto the back. I love how these shapes work together. This Bolero is such a good canvas.

After deciding on my color palette, the next decision was to figure out the shape placement. The great thing about appliqué is that you can move shapes around very easily to see what you like before making the final attachment. I cut out my shapes first and auditioned them in a few different spots before deciding on this one. I like the way they echo the neckline while breaking up the proportions in a nice way on the back. Plus, you’re able to get a good feel for the overall appliqué motif.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also fun about appliquéing a project like this is that there is less of it than you’d need on a full project. It can move along fairly quickly, while providing a nice impact. I did appliqué them by hand, but you could totally add them via the machine and/or something fusible.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

The vest isn’t lined, which made me pay closer attention to having clean-ish starts and stops, because I knew you’d be able to see them on the inside. Of course, if you didn’t want to concern yourself with this, it would be very easy to line this vest so you wouldn’t have to!

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I got a little fancy (and fussy) with my facings. I managed to get a bit of the scallop from the fabric in there, and I also spiced things up with some neon serger thread.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Tool Tip – remember this handy seam wheel set I mentioned in the Hunt Harriot post? The 3/8″ wheel made adding in the seam allowance to the Bolero pattern a complete breeze. While this book is translated into English, the pattern pieces do not include any seam allowances. You’ll want to add them in yourself.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the buttonup, I used the Grainline Archer with the Popover variation, which I LOVE. It’s such a great pattern.

The yarn dye that I chose from Harriot is super soft and the perfect weight for a buttonup. It is a dream to wear, and I love how versatile the color and pattern will be for mixing/matching/layering with other stuff in my closet. (Plus, I got a little fun with my yoke…)

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made this pattern many times and cannot recommend it enough. It’s a fun sew and an easy wear. I pretty much made it as the pattern is written, but decided at the last-minute to omit the top part of the collar. When I got to that step, I realized I’d not done that before, and so I left the stand as it is. I really like it!

Also, I had some fun with my buttons…

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

Making a buttonup can highlight your button stash–bountiful or lacking. In this case, I discovered that while I have been doing a good job of stockpiling buttonup options, my black department is lacking. I’ll keep that in mind in the future, but luckily I had these fun gingham buttons to use.

There we go!

patterns: Bolero Vest, Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara, Hunt Appliqué Pattern (appliqué on vest) by me, and Archer Buttonup with Popover Variation by Grainline.

template: Hunt quilt template (1/8″ seam allowance)

fabric(s): all from Harriot

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Polk Clothes.

Polk Fabric Clothes . Carolyn Friedlander

Polk starts shipping this month–yay! With that, I thought I’d share some Polk clothes that I’ve made.

Willow Tank . Carolyn FriedlanderFirst up is the Willow Tank–a personal favorite. The pattern is by Grainline, and it’s one of those patterns that never lets me down. Because I know the fit is great and it’s super speedy to make, I made this one while packing for Quilt Market. I couldn’t help but make one more thing to wear at the show.

Willow Tank . Carolyn Friedlander

I really like the weight of this fabric with this particular pattern. They go quite well together.

Pattern: Willow Tank by Grainline

Fabric(s): Polk, bias trim in Gleaned.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

Also by Grainline is a tunic from the new Uniform book that was recently released with Madder.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

I love the versatility of the design. There are two neck, two sleeve and two hem options that are all interchangeable, which means there are lots of possible results. Of course, I wanted to include the pockets in my first version. I also went with the round neck and sleeveless option.

The pockets are pretty fantastic, and I’m generally on board with how everything turned out. With the next version, I’ll make adjustments to the darts and length, as I found the as-designed result to need some tweaking on me. But overall, I think there is a lot of potential with this one.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Uniform by Grainline and Madder

Fabric: Polk

Lexi Top . Carolyn Friedlander

The Lexi A-Line Top by Named is a pattern that I’ve been eyeing for a few years now. I finally made it, and I’m so glad that I did–it’s a new favorite! Their version is cropped, and I wanted mine to be full length, so I lengthened mine by about 4″. It turned out perfect.

I was kind of worried about the sleeves being a tad too much in a more structured fabric, but they’re just right. I will definitely be making this one again.

Lexi Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Lexi A-Line Top by Named

Fabric: Polk

The Adeline dress by Style Arc is a neat pattern, and I like how it came together. I’m not super wild about the hemline, and if I were to make it again, I’d make some adjustments there. Otherwise, the pockets are great, and I think this could also be nice in either a knit or some drapey woven.

Adeline Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Adeline Dress by Style Arc

Fabric: Polk

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

The West Water Tunic by Squam was enjoyable to sew, but if we’re being honest, I’m not sure that I’ll make one again without some adjustments. It’s a lovely tunic, and there are many online versions that look great, but the final result on me felt a little maternity-ish. Maybe on someone taller or with a different shape, it would look right? I do love the collar and the pockets.

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, I like how these glass buttons that I’d picked up at a show look with the fabric.

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: West Water Tunic by Squam

Fabric: Polk

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

Finally, I want to end on a favorite–the Moji pants by Seamwork. I’ve made so many of these guys starting with this pair in Euclid. I love them so much!

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

They’re cozy, comfortable and look pretty stylish. Any pants with a drawstring feels like cheating, and how could you not love these big, handy pockets? These pants check all of my favorite boxes.

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Moji by Seamwork

Fabric: Polk

Polk Fabric Clothes . Carolyn Friedlander

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Polk Pouches and Bags.

Bag making can be really fun and very practical. Here are some Polk pouches and bags that I made using the new fabric.

Polk Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Noodlehead makes some of my favorite bag and pouch patterns, and I’ve made several of them out of Polk.

First up are some pencil pouches, which are from a free tutorial of hers. These guys are great and not just for pencils. I’ve used mine for toiletries, hand sewing and several other things.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

What’s fun is that you can come up with different fabric combinations for the outside panels.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Pattern: Pencil Pouch Tutorial by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Yarn Dyed in Aqua

Polk Pencil Pouches

Next up are some Petal Pouches (pattern by Noodlehead).

Polk Petal Pouches

There are 2 sizes included in the pattern–small and large. I’ve made both. I use the smaller size to hold ear buds, chargers and other travel essentials. The bigger one holds more, and I’ve even used mine as a clutch when attending an event.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

It’s such an attractive shape, and if you’re worried about sewing curves–don’t be! This one is pretty gentle.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Pattern: Petal Pouch by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Gleaned and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Petal Pouches

I finally made a Traverse bag (pattern also by Noodlehead).

Polk Traverse Bag

I love this bag so much, and it’s been on my to-sew list forever. Since making it (like immediately upon making it) I’ve been carrying it around daily, and it’s been perfect. The pattern includes 2 size options, and this is the smallest size.

Polk Traverse Bag

I love the small size because it means I’m not overloading myself and carrying more than what I need. I find that this size holds all of the essentials.

Polk Traverse Bag

Also handy, I used one of Anna’s hardware kits. It included the zippers, d-rings, slider, cording and little leather accents. I love that she has these available in her shop.

Polk Traverse Bag

Pattern: Traverse Bag by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Essex Classic Wovens, hardware kit from Noodlehead

Polk Traverse Bag

It’s worth mentioning that I also recently updated my wallet situation. I’m now using Noodlehead’s minimalist wallet (the smaller size), and it works perfectly with the Traverse. If you’ve ever wanted to make a wallet, this one is a fun and smart sew. I love how easily it comes together.

Polk Minimalist Wallet

Pattern: Minimalist Wallet by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Liberty

Last up is not from Noodlehead, but instead from Grainline. It’s the Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set. Someone made me one of these, and I use it ALL the time. It’s such a perfect size for many things, but I’m often using it to tote around sewing supplies like my rotary cutter, scissors and other stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Plus, the flat, zippered pocket on the front (there’s a flap hiding the zipper) is perfect for holding your seam gauge and other flat stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Pattern: Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set by Grainline

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

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