Archive | sewing

My First Jumpsuit

It’s finished! My Rory Jumpsuit–and my first jumpsuit ever–is finished! I learned some new things about making jumpsuits and about my own physical proportions that aren’t as obvious when just sewing separates. It was fun!

Rory Jumpsuit in Brussels Washer linen

Making My First Jumpsuit

As I mentioned last month, the Rory Jumpsuit by True Bias looked like fun. It seemed like the kind of project that could give me some new things to think about. Naturally, I started by browsing around the internet to see what others had done with their own versions. There are loads of them on IG just looking at the Rory and Yari hashtags. (The pattern name changed at some point.) That gave me a great place to start.

When it came to cutting and sewing, working with full-body-length pieces was a new feeling. The pieces are just so long!

Rory Jumpsuit in Brussels Washer linen with snaps

Modifications (to start)

I made some modifications off the bat as well as a few more after the first try-on. If I were to make this jumpsuit again, I’d make some further changes too.

Rory Jumpsuit

Off the bat, I shortened the torso 1″. The pattern is written for someone who is 5’5″, and I’m maybe 5’4″ on a good day. Normally you might decide to take the excess out of the bodice and leg more evenly, but I already knew that I’m high waisted. Plus I wanted to be able to cuff the pant.

For any future versions, I’d definitely take a bit more length out of the bodice. The waist of the garment still falls a bit low on me, which restricts movement a bit and means the pockets are lower than I’d like for them to be. The Brussels Washer fabric that I used might also be exaggerating some of this as it’s drapey and has a good weight to it. This all makes it pull down a bit more than a different fabric choice. It’s still very comfortable and wearable.

I also adjusted the neckline a smidge by rounding it and cutting it higher. This was a personal preference, but in the end I’m really glad that I did because of how low the neckline falls on me even having done that. Making it again, I’d raise the neckline just a bit more–I’m realizing that this part of my torso is short too. Although I’m very pleased with where it ended up!

When cutting the garment, I also cut the leg a bit wider than the original pattern. (Here’s a tutorial if you are interested.) I knew I’d be able to take width out, and so I wanted to have some room to work with.

Rory Jumpsuit in Brussels Washer linen

Modifications (after a try on)

After the first try-on, I decided to take a significant amount out from the width in the bodice. Although this style can look great belted, I wasn’t wanting to do that, so I worked for a closer fit. I ended up taking at least 5″ total from the width. This design has princess seams, and therefore many places to take things in–a great bonus of this particular style. Since I’d already topstitched the front and back princess seams, I took this out of the sides and center back.

The final modification had to do with the closure. After asking around and doing a smidge of research, I opted for a sewn-in snap closure. I like the clean look of this–although buttons can look great too. I’m also eager to see how this choice affects the ease of wearing it, and mainly–ahem–going to the bathroom.

Rory Jumpsuit in Brussels Washer linen with sew-in snaps

The Fabric

The fabric is Brussels Washer Yarn Dyed by Robert Kaufman, a linen/rayon blend in the Chestnut color. This fabric is SO dreamy for a project like this. It’s comfortable, super drapey, and resists and embraces wrinkles in the right amount. As I already mentioned, the weight and drape can make it fall quite a bit differently from other fabrics, so I’m curious to see how this would fit with a different fabric choice.

Rory Jumpsuit in Brussels Washer linen

Next Jumpsuit?

This was really fun, and I’m enjoying wearing my new jumpsuit. The fabric is very comfortable, and I love the effortlessness of a single-piece outfit. Plus, sewing a jumpsuit is still new territory to me, so I am eager to make more. I can’t wait to dial in on my proportions better with the next version and try out different fabrics and styles.

I’d be more than happy to make another Rory, but instead I think I’ll try the jumpsuit suggested in Sonya Philip’s new book The Act of Sewing*. It’s not a super-formal pattern, but instead she walks you through using basic pieces provided in the book (pants + top) to make a jumpsuit. I’m think I’m ready for that adventure.

(*affiliate link)

Project Details

Rory Jumpsuit

Pattern: Rory Jumpsuit by True Bias

Fabric: Brussels Washer Yarn Dyed by Robert Kaufman in Chestnut

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Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

My Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup are some new favorites for sure.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

We’ll start with the bolero vest. The pattern is in Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara. It’s a Japanese sewing pattern book that has been translated into English.

Bolero Vest in Casual Sweet Clothes Book

I LOVE the trim detail on the version in the book, but after looking and not finding anything good I decided to take matters into my own hands. Sometimes not having the right option forces you to creatively discover a new one!

Insert the idea to appliqué some shapes from my Hunt pattern onto the back. I love how these shapes work together. This Bolero is such a good canvas.

After deciding on my color palette, the next decision was to figure out the shape placement. The great thing about appliqué is that you can move shapes around very easily to see what you like before making the final attachment. I cut out my shapes first and auditioned them in a few different spots before deciding on this one. I like the way they echo the neckline while breaking up the proportions in a nice way on the back. Plus, you’re able to get a good feel for the overall appliqué motif.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also fun about appliquéing a project like this is that there is less of it than you’d need on a full project. It can move along fairly quickly, while providing a nice impact. I did appliqué them by hand, but you could totally add them via the machine and/or something fusible.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

The vest isn’t lined, which made me pay closer attention to having clean-ish starts and stops, because I knew you’d be able to see them on the inside. Of course, if you didn’t want to concern yourself with this, it would be very easy to line this vest so you wouldn’t have to!

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I got a little fancy (and fussy) with my facings. I managed to get a bit of the scallop from the fabric in there, and I also spiced things up with some neon serger thread.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Tool Tip – remember this handy seam wheel set I mentioned in the Hunt Harriot post? The 3/8″ wheel made adding in the seam allowance to the Bolero pattern a complete breeze. While this book is translated into English, the pattern pieces do not include any seam allowances. You’ll want to add them in yourself.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the buttonup, I used the Grainline Archer with the Popover variation, which I LOVE. It’s such a great pattern.

The yarn dye that I chose from Harriot is super soft and the perfect weight for a buttonup. It is a dream to wear, and I love how versatile the color and pattern will be for mixing/matching/layering with other stuff in my closet. (Plus, I got a little fun with my yoke…)

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made this pattern many times and cannot recommend it enough. It’s a fun sew and an easy wear. I pretty much made it as the pattern is written, but decided at the last-minute to omit the top part of the collar. When I got to that step, I realized I’d not done that before, and so I left the stand as it is. I really like it!

Also, I had some fun with my buttons…

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

Making a buttonup can highlight your button stash–bountiful or lacking. In this case, I discovered that while I have been doing a good job of stockpiling buttonup options, my black department is lacking. I’ll keep that in mind in the future, but luckily I had these fun gingham buttons to use.

There we go!

patterns: Bolero Vest, Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara, Hunt Appliqué Pattern (appliqué on vest) by me, and Archer Buttonup with Popover Variation by Grainline.

template: Hunt quilt template (1/8″ seam allowance)

fabric(s): all from Harriot

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Polk Clothes.

Polk Fabric Clothes . Carolyn Friedlander

Polk starts shipping this month–yay! With that, I thought I’d share some Polk clothes that I’ve made.

Willow Tank . Carolyn FriedlanderFirst up is the Willow Tank–a personal favorite. The pattern is by Grainline, and it’s one of those patterns that never lets me down. Because I know the fit is great and it’s super speedy to make, I made this one while packing for Quilt Market. I couldn’t help but make one more thing to wear at the show.

Willow Tank . Carolyn Friedlander

I really like the weight of this fabric with this particular pattern. They go quite well together.

Pattern: Willow Tank by Grainline

Fabric(s): Polk, bias trim in Gleaned.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

Also by Grainline is a tunic from the new Uniform book that was recently released with Madder.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

I love the versatility of the design. There are two neck, two sleeve and two hem options that are all interchangeable, which means there are lots of possible results. Of course, I wanted to include the pockets in my first version. I also went with the round neck and sleeveless option.

The pockets are pretty fantastic, and I’m generally on board with how everything turned out. With the next version, I’ll make adjustments to the darts and length, as I found the as-designed result to need some tweaking on me. But overall, I think there is a lot of potential with this one.

Polk Uniform . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Uniform by Grainline and Madder

Fabric: Polk

Lexi Top . Carolyn Friedlander

The Lexi A-Line Top by Named is a pattern that I’ve been eyeing for a few years now. I finally made it, and I’m so glad that I did–it’s a new favorite! Their version is cropped, and I wanted mine to be full length, so I lengthened mine by about 4″. It turned out perfect.

I was kind of worried about the sleeves being a tad too much in a more structured fabric, but they’re just right. I will definitely be making this one again.

Lexi Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Lexi A-Line Top by Named

Fabric: Polk

The Adeline dress by Style Arc is a neat pattern, and I like how it came together. I’m not super wild about the hemline, and if I were to make it again, I’d make some adjustments there. Otherwise, the pockets are great, and I think this could also be nice in either a knit or some drapey woven.

Adeline Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Adeline Dress by Style Arc

Fabric: Polk

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

The West Water Tunic by Squam was enjoyable to sew, but if we’re being honest, I’m not sure that I’ll make one again without some adjustments. It’s a lovely tunic, and there are many online versions that look great, but the final result on me felt a little maternity-ish. Maybe on someone taller or with a different shape, it would look right? I do love the collar and the pockets.

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, I like how these glass buttons that I’d picked up at a show look with the fabric.

West Water Tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: West Water Tunic by Squam

Fabric: Polk

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

Finally, I want to end on a favorite–the Moji pants by Seamwork. I’ve made so many of these guys starting with this pair in Euclid. I love them so much!

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

They’re cozy, comfortable and look pretty stylish. Any pants with a drawstring feels like cheating, and how could you not love these big, handy pockets? These pants check all of my favorite boxes.

Polk Moji Pants . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Moji by Seamwork

Fabric: Polk

Polk Fabric Clothes . Carolyn Friedlander

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Polk Pouches and Bags.

Bag making can be really fun and very practical. Here are some Polk pouches and bags that I made using the new fabric.

Polk Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Noodlehead makes some of my favorite bag and pouch patterns, and I’ve made several of them out of Polk.

First up are some pencil pouches, which are from a free tutorial of hers. These guys are great and not just for pencils. I’ve used mine for toiletries, hand sewing and several other things.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

What’s fun is that you can come up with different fabric combinations for the outside panels.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Pattern: Pencil Pouch Tutorial by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Yarn Dyed in Aqua

Polk Pencil Pouches

Next up are some Petal Pouches (pattern by Noodlehead).

Polk Petal Pouches

There are 2 sizes included in the pattern–small and large. I’ve made both. I use the smaller size to hold ear buds, chargers and other travel essentials. The bigger one holds more, and I’ve even used mine as a clutch when attending an event.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

It’s such an attractive shape, and if you’re worried about sewing curves–don’t be! This one is pretty gentle.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Pattern: Petal Pouch by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Gleaned and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Petal Pouches

I finally made a Traverse bag (pattern also by Noodlehead).

Polk Traverse Bag

I love this bag so much, and it’s been on my to-sew list forever. Since making it (like immediately upon making it) I’ve been carrying it around daily, and it’s been perfect. The pattern includes 2 size options, and this is the smallest size.

Polk Traverse Bag

I love the small size because it means I’m not overloading myself and carrying more than what I need. I find that this size holds all of the essentials.

Polk Traverse Bag

Also handy, I used one of Anna’s hardware kits. It included the zippers, d-rings, slider, cording and little leather accents. I love that she has these available in her shop.

Polk Traverse Bag

Pattern: Traverse Bag by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Essex Classic Wovens, hardware kit from Noodlehead

Polk Traverse Bag

It’s worth mentioning that I also recently updated my wallet situation. I’m now using Noodlehead’s minimalist wallet (the smaller size), and it works perfectly with the Traverse. If you’ve ever wanted to make a wallet, this one is a fun and smart sew. I love how easily it comes together.

Polk Minimalist Wallet

Pattern: Minimalist Wallet by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Liberty

Last up is not from Noodlehead, but instead from Grainline. It’s the Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set. Someone made me one of these, and I use it ALL the time. It’s such a perfect size for many things, but I’m often using it to tote around sewing supplies like my rotary cutter, scissors and other stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Plus, the flat, zippered pocket on the front (there’s a flap hiding the zipper) is perfect for holding your seam gauge and other flat stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Pattern: Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set by Grainline

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

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My favorite t-shirt patterns.

With Blake coming out, I knew I had a good excuse to find the perfect t-shirt pattern. It turns out, there are many.

To be completely honest, I was never much of a t-shirt wearer before I started making my own t-shirts. Looking back, it makes total sense. Store-bought t-shirts just never really fit me right. You’d think there would be more leniency with t-shirts given the fact that the stretch is forgiving, but that’s never been the case for me. There’s something about a t-shirt that makes me want a better balance between fit, fabric and cut–even more so than what I desire from woven tops. I’m not sure why. Having said that, I don’t think that sewing your own t-shirt should be scary. In many ways they’re easier to take in and make adjustments to. Plus, there are TONS of good patterns and resources out there, and this list just touches on some of them. Maybe one or some will work for you?

Here are some of my faves.

My first two faves cover two very important bases–a fitted t-shirt and a roomy t-shirt. They are Rio by Seamwork and the Basic Tee by Seamly.

Seamwork Rio . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a Rio in Robert Kaufman speckle cotton jersey. The only alteration made to this pattern was to straighten the hem, rather than do the high/low thing. I wear this speckle version so often that it was the first thing I sewed up with blake.

Rio Tee . Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

Rio Tee . Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

You can see another version of Rio in the Blake Lookbook on the lovely Vanessa.

Rio Tee in Blake Knit

The Basic Tee by Seamly is another favorite. Whereas the Rio is a more fitted tee, the Basic Tee by Seamly is more relaxed and has a pocket.

Seamly Basic Tee in Speckle Jersey

This version is also in Robert Kaufman’s speckle cotton jersey, and I wear it all the time. It’s kind of become my unofficial airport uniform. You’d think that I’d change it up, but I just love this one so much.

Seamly Basic Tee in Speckle JerseyI haven’t made one of these in blake yet, but it’s on the agenda. I made sure to cut some pieces out when I was prepping for Quilt Market. It will be happening…

Next up, we can talk about Jane by Seamwork. This is a pattern I was eager to try, and I’ll admit, I wasn’t thrilled with the fit right off the bat, but after some modifications to the neckline (I lowered it quite a bit) and length (I shortened it quite a bit), I’m very in love with this shirt. (By the way, I was wearing this guy on day 1 of Quilt Market.)

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

I think this type of shirt would be perfect for some fun appliqué or other personalization and detailing. Seamwork did a good job of showing some of those possibilities off.

Seamwork Jane in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

We can’t talk about t-shirts without talking about Grainline’s Linden, which I know, is a sweatshirt…but in the right weight, it is also the perfect t-shirt.

This one (seen in the Blake Lookbook) is View B of the pattern which features short sleeves, shorter bodice length and no sleeve or bodice bindings. It’s really great.

Linden shirt in Blake knit

Linden shirt in Blake knit

A long-sleeved version is pretty great too.

Linden sweatshirt in Blake knit

I love a jersey-weight Linden because it’s perfect for layering. I have several others that I wear often, so it’ll be good to get this one in the rotation.

Linden sweatshirt in Blake knit

Also in the Grainline family is Lark. I don’t have one (yet) in blake, but I’m sure it’ll happen at some point. Lark is fabulous basic t-shirt with tons of handy adaptations available for you with different sleeve lengths, neck lines, cardigan variations, etc.

Oh, and the Hemlock tee by Grainline too! It’s actually a free pattern if you sign up for their newsletter. It’s single-sized–so heads up on that. You’ll maybe need to make some fit adjustments. I made one, but need to take some pics. (In the meantime you can see mine here and here posted by JanieLou.) I LOVE this top and have already been wearing it a lot. As for the fit, I did have to tinker around a bit as the one size that it comes in isn’t my size, but if you have some experience, it’s not too tricky. And knit is forgiving.

Next up is the Wanderlust Tee by Fancy Tiger Crafts. (You can actually watch how to make this on CreativeBug here. Even though I’ve sewn knits many times before, I learned a lot watching this video and others by Fancy Tiger.)

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

This t-shirt is comfy, and I like the style. It features a slightly dropped sleeve (which is a little easier to install if you are fearful of sewing in sleeves) and a curved hem. The version is drafted to be kind of cropped, so I’ve lengthened all versions that I’ve made. This version in blake is maybe the 3rd that I’ve made so far…clearly, I’m a fan of this pattern.

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

What’s nice about any t-shirt is that you can switch up the collar and/or pocket with another fabric for a nice little change of pace. Here’s another Wanderlust Tee doing just that.

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

Wanderlust Tee in Blake Knit

Hopefully this list isn’t too overwhelming for you. I know that there is a lot out there, which is why I thought it would be useful to report in on some of my findings. Plus, the sheer amount represented here is a testament to how speedy knits can be to sew up. With knit stuff, it’s not uncommon for me to cut out and sew up multiples at once.

Do you have any favorite t-shirt patterns? Please feel free to leave a comment and share!

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Scout Tank and Top in Friedlander Fabric

When I was in Australia, I picked up a great top at a local clothing store. (It’s not pictured on their site, but I found some shots here and here). I just love the shape and style and have been wearing it often. Because of that, I thought it’d be fun to try to recreate it so I’d have a few more.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

Lucky for me, the Scout tee by Grainline is a great starting point. It’s a project that I’ve made many times (one version is here), and each time I make it, I tweak things here and there to customize fit and/or style. That’s the beauty of finding a good pattern. It can give you much freedom to try new things!

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

This first version stays pretty true to the Australian inspiration in that it has a wider collar, curved hem and some billowing fullness dropping down at the sides.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

To make these changes, I added width to the sides–both to the front and back tapering out from the bust. I also added length to the hem so that I could curve it, and then the neck band was a relatively easy add. I roughly went off the thickness of the inspiration piece, cut a new band on the bias and installed it.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The Australian original is made from a sturdier cotton, but this version is much lighter. Lawn tops are pretty great (I might be obsessed), and I’d been wanting to make a top out of this green print from my latest collection. The result drapes nicely and will be perfectly cool and appropriate for the summer.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The original also has some neat seams by the shoulders that I had a fun time drafting into the Scout. Using this particular fabric doesn’t make it very pronounced, but I could see playing with more contrast in a future version if the mood should strike.

Scout Tee in Friedlander Lawn . Carolyn Friedlander

The next version has a few other design tweaks.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

And I’ll admit, this was kind of a compulsive sew. I was eager to make a shirt with the big tree stripe from my latest collection, using the stripe as a fun element in the bodice.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I also decided to make it right before leaving for QuiltCon this past February. (There’s nothing more fun than being able to pack a new garment for a trip!)

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Again, I started with the Scout tee, making the adjustments to the side seems and length. When it came time for sleeves, I decided to omit them. Sleeveless is perfect for Florida, and it’s also easy to layer with a cardigan.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

After some debate, I decided to not do the collar on this one. I liked the idea of the print being front, center and unencumbered by much else.

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Scout Tank in Friedlander Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The hem, arm and neck openings are finished with bias tape. When I make bias tape, I often make more than I need so that I always have some on hand. Here I used some from my stash, and it worked perfectly.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I kept the additional shoulder seam and played just a bit with the part of the print that I used. It’s a subtle detail that adds that little extra something.

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Scout Tee . Friedlander fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Inspiration : This shirt from Vic and Bert, via my travels in Australia

Pattern (with some adjustments) : Scout Tee by Grainline

Fabric : Sleeved version is made from my Friedlander Lawn collection, and the sleeveless version features a print from my Friedlander collection with bias tape made from Cambridge Lawn in Nude by Robert Kaufman

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Sewing with Friedlander Lawn.

Friedlander Lawn Garments . Carolyn Friedlander

Sewing with Friedlander Lawn is an easy given. Lawn works really well for garments because of it’s fine-ness, softness and beautiful drape. Here are some things I’ve made (/been wearing constantly). Apologies in advance for throwing so many projects in to one post! I’m hoping it is handy to have many of the projects all in one place.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Because of its weight and wearability, lawn is perfectly suited for blouses and tops, and the Archer by Grainline is one of my favorites. It’s awesome in just about every way. The directions are well-written, the pieces are well-drafted, and there is a ton of support for making it in terms of sew-alongs, etc. If you’ve never made a button-up (or even a garment), this is the way to go, because you’re in good hands with Grainline–they have your back!

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

This is the popover variation, which does require a special pattern pack. The main difference between this one and the regular one is that the popover version doesn’t button all the way down. There’s also an alternate option for the sleeve plackets in this version too. I always like to learn new tricks and alternatives, which makes this route a fun one. If you’ve already made the regular Archer a few times, the popover version is a fun way to change things up.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing to note about the pieces in the Friedlander Lawn group is that there are no color-palette repeats with the quilting cotton group. I’m not one for redundancy, and so if the same designs will be used on a different substrate, I see that as an opportunity to explore more color options. And I did.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Like I said, button-ups and lawn go hand-in-hand, so this Archer hasn’t been (and won’t be) the only button-up so far. I also tried out a new pattern by Named, their Helmi Trench Blouse. (Take note that this pattern also features a dress option. I’m totally into that too and plan to make one soon!)

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

The detailing on this button-up is really interesting and what made me want to make it. There are front and back flaps reminiscent of a trench coat.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus there is a rounded collar that is very adorable.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

There is also a gathered sleeve cuff, although I decided against that and instead went with a regular buttoned cuff and placket. Actually, I used the placket and cuff pieces from the Archer Popover, but narrowed the cuff because it felt like a more appropriate proportion for this style blouse. The split hem is also a nice touch.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

I wasn’t sure how the fit would work out, but it’s perfect for me without many adjustments. This was surprising, because the standard Named fit is for someone quite a bit taller than I am. I’m about 5’4″ and the only adjustment I made was to shorten the sleeves just a bit, which had to be done anyway with the changes I made to the cuff. I made no changes to the overall length or width otherwise.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is another button-up, yes, I’m really into lawn button-ups, it’s just too good of a fit for both the fabric and what I like wearing on a daily basis. This time it’s the Alder Shirtdress, another Grainline favorite.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

A sleeveless shirtdress is a personal favorite because of how versatile it is. I’ve already worn this as-is, layered with tights and a sweater, over jeans and with a cardigan. Sweet stuff.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

The only thing that I kick myself about is that I didn’t add side pockets. Note to self: on ALL future versions, there will be side pockets.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

This print in the collection reminds me of old shirtings, which is why I was quick to make a shirt with it.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

When I audition buttons, I always try out these gingham ones first. A friend gave me a bag of them in assorted colors, and I love when they work so well with a project.

The Ruffle-Front Blouse (from Happy Homemade: Sew Chic by Yoshiko Tsukiori) is one I’ve made before and wear often. My previous version was made out of quilting cotton, which wears well, but I knew a lawn version could be even better.

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this book is one of the Japanese sewing books that has been translated into English. If you’re wanting to dive into some Japanese sewing, a translated option is a great place to start.

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

From another Japanese sewing book–Check & Stripe, title otherwise unknown because this one isn’t translated into English (heads up!)–is this lovely dress that I’d been eyeing ever since getting the book. (It’s the project featured on the cover.)

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

The detailing is so pretty between the rounded and split collar and then the pleated sleeve cuffs.

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, it does have pockets. Yay for that.

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Have you heard of Peppermint Magazine? I hadn’t until seeing someone post a finished garment from their free pattern collection. It turns out that Peppermint is a really thoughtful and well-done magazine out of Australia that conveniently (and generously) releases a free garment pattern with each issue. Win win. I have several of the patterns on my to-make list, but here’s the Peplum Top from Issue 31.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s a little spot at the shoulder where you can slip in a bit of another print, which I did.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Alteration-wise, I did reduce some of the ruffle by not cutting the strip as long as it suggests. If I remember correctly, I think I made it short enough to work with the width of fabric, because that seemed like enough for me and an efficient way to cut it. In future versions, I’d add a little more length to the bodice as this one hits me just a smidge higher than I like. Easy future fix.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also Sointu Kimono Tee by Named. This pattern is intended for a knit, which I didn’t realize until I was about to make it. (Ha!) While a knit would be nice, I figured lawn would probably work pretty well too. I didn’t have to make any adjustments, because there was enough ease built-in to work with using a woven. (On a side note, if you’d like to read up on swapping out wovens for knits, Christine Haynes wrote a great article for Seamwork, here.)

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Because I was using a woven instead of a knit I cut the sleeves on the bias to give them a little more softness and movement.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

I think it also works without the belt.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Gotta love the versatility.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Ok, last up is a little tunic that I made for my niece. I have lots of kid stuff planned–including some button-ups for my nephews, but the Ryka tunic by Whitney Deal was too easy and cute to throw together. I need to get a picture of her in it!

Friedlander Lawn Ryka tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Thanks for following along with me! I hope that you’re having fun with the lawn too!

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Fall sewing with Euclid.

I guess it’s getting cooler other places…right? You can’t really tell where I am, but in the spirit of seasons changing and warmer-wardrobes calling, here’s a little bit of fall sewing with Euclid. Bonus, both of these projects are quilty-crossovers. So if you’re wanting a garment project with plenty of quilty familiarity, here you go.

For the record, I’m actually not a fan of looking ahead to cooler temperatures–I prefer the heat–but this time I do have a little more to look forward to, specifically, the cooler-weather goodies that I sewed up waaay earlier this year in Euclid and haven’t gotten a chance to wear. (Note to self: Maybe cool-weather-sewing in Spring is a good idea? It gives you some new pieces to look forward to when you may not be excited about cooler temps otherwise…)

First up, my Quilted Vest in Euclid, (free!) pattern by Purl Soho. Looking at this, reminds me that I still need to sew on my snaps…

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I used wool batting, some architextures in the lining (this one), and machine quilted it. The pattern was relatively easy and straight-forward. Plus, it came together quite quickly.

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Tamarack Jacket in Euclid, pattern by Grainline. It’s a good one! My typical Grainline alteration is to shorten the sleeves a bit, which I did here. Otherwise, no changes were necessary for me. It looks like I also need to sew the closure hooks on this guy…I guess it’s obvious which parts of the project I tend to neglect…

Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like the vest, this is a quilted garment with wool batting, but unlike the vest, this guy is hand quilted. I liked the idea of it being softer and a bit looser. Plus I was able to play with thread color a bit. It’s lined in Cambridge lawn, which makes for the dreamiest of insides. Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Happy fall sewing!!

All photos by Alexis Wharem.

 

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Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts.

It’s summertime, a.k.a. my favorite time of the year, and nothing says summertime like a good pair of shorts. I live in shorts all summer long…and actually, since it’s summer–or feels like summer–in Florida most of the year, my shorts-wearing season extends well past the typical months elsewhere. Because of that, good shorts patterns always catch my eye. My favorite go-to is an out-of-print Simplicity pattern, but that doesn’t mean I’m not enticed by other things out there. Enter the Scallop Hem Shorts pattern by Pattern Runway. I knew immediately upon discovery that I’d be making some Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts.

Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts

I LOVE the scallop-hem detail. It’s a little bit feminine, very stylish and also quite flattering.

Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts

The higher-waisted fit is comfortable and also flattering, plus, the side-zip closure makes for a pretty easy install.

Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts

I always like a good detailing opportunity, and the hem finish is a good place to slip in a little bit of something fun. On mine, I used a print from Carkai.

Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts

The pattern is pretty straight forward and not too tricky in terms of its construction. Like I mentioned, having a side zip is a little easier than doing a fly. I’d say the most challenging part of these shorts is the welt pockets in the back, another detail that I love, and a construction aspect that was a good challenge for me. If you’re new to garment construction, I have two thoughts about this. First, you could just omit the back pockets OR install a basic patch pocket if you don’t want to be bothered by the welt. Or, you could take on the challenge if you’re up for it. The instructions are well-written and a good guide to welt success.

Euclid Scallop Hem Shorts

In case you’re wondering, the top is another home-sewn goodie and personal favorite. It’s based on the Linden sweatshirt by Grainline, view B. While the pattern is written to be used with a knit, converting to using a woven fabric, like this one from Carkai, isn’t too big of a deal. Making the same size that I would if it were for knit, works fine for me, and the only adjustment I made was to create darts at the back shoulder within each of the raglan seams. That helps shape the shoulders a bit better so the neck doesn’t gape–not a problem if using knits, but something to adapt when using a woven.

Yay, for home-sewn clothes!

Shorts Pattern : Scallop Hem Shorts by Pattern Runway

Shorts Fabric(s) : Euclid and Carkai

Top Pattern : Linden Sweatshirt by Grainline Studio

Top Fabric : Carkai

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Summer shorts: Essex and Interweave Chambray.

new shorts_carolyn friedlander

It’s been a toasty summer–not that I’m complaining–I prefer the heat over the cold any day. But because of that, I can never have too many pairs of shorts. It’s what I live in, and I thought it’d be fun to adventure making some with Interweave Chambray and Essex Yarn Dye linen.

essex and chambray shorts_carolyn friedlander

The Denim color in Interweave Chambray is the perfect shade of blue and a great weight for shorts. These guys have been pairing well with many things, especially some of my new Mercers.

interweave chambray shorts_carolyn friedlander

The Essex Yarn Dye (in Espresso) has a really appealing texture and great color. I love a pair of linen shorts, and these are fitting in with the rest of my wardrobe so easily.

essex shorts_carolyn friedlander

I used is my go-to shorts pattern (Built By Wendy for Simplicity #3850). Unfortunately it’s out-of-print, but you can find copies of it floating around on Ebay and Etsy. (Or you can also try Grainline’s Maritime shorts pattern.)

chambray and essex shorts_carolyn friedlander

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Scout tee in Doewide.

This is another garment that’s been on my to-sew list for a while.

scout tee_doe wide_3_carolyn friedlander

It’s the Scout tee by Grainline Studio–a popular top that I’ve seen many people wear and many different versions of. It’s a great beginner project for anyone looking to take on a little bit of garment sewing.

In this one, I used some Doewide plus a little Carolina Gingham for contrast binding at the neck–both in grey/white, both super linear, both right up my alley.

scout tee_doe wide_2_carolyn friedlander

As with all Grainline patterns, this one is awesome and super professionally drafted and written. Jen (of Grainline) knows what she’s doing, and she also knows what I like to wear.

Adjustments to the pattern aren’t really necessary, but I made a few. First, I lengthened the sleeves as well as the bodice–both personal preferences. I then sculpted the sides and brought them in for a closer fit, although I still kept it somewhat loose for easy movement. I then also added a (small) vent to the hem at the sides. I seem to be into side vents at the moment…

scout tee_doe wide_1_carolyn friedlander

After the final press, I was very satisfied with the results, but the true love didn’t come until I actually started to wear it–it’s so comfortable(!), and I really like the look. It has a casual effortlessness to it that I know will play out well with many different fabrics.

scout tee_doe wide_8_carolyn friedlander

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My many Mercer tunics.

mercer tunics_1_carolyn friedlander

I might have gotten a little carried away with the Mercer Tunic pattern by Whitney Deal

I’ve now made 4 of them over not that long of a time period…

mercer tunics_4_carolyn friedlander

There are several things that I like about this pattern. First, the style suits my current wardrobe mood and weather conditions perfectly. In Florida, you can pretty much rely on the weather being on the toasty side, so my standard pull from the closet is usually a pair of shorts and some sort of sleeveless top. The Wiksten tank (a few examples here and here) has been my go-to for awhile, which is why I think I’ve been ready for a change of pace.

I like the simple style of this top, and how the sleeves offer a slight drop over the shoulder. Plus, there are some enticing detailing opportunities like adding a contrast binding, making use of interesting buttons, or in selecting your overall fabric. On top of all of that, it doesn’t use a ton of fabric and it comes together fairly quickly.

Win-win-win-win.

Overall, it’s a flattering silhouette and I only made a couple of alterations.  First, I shortened the tunic by a few inches as well as added a curve to the hemline. I’m not super tall, so eliminating some of the length is a better fit for me. Second, I took in the sides a bit for a better fit as well.

In my first version, I used this Swiss Dot Chambray in black. I’ve been completely obsessed with this fabric ever since it came out. (It’s already made cameos in my Collection quilt and in an Austin House quilt.) The texture is amazing, and the drape is perfect for a summer shirt.

Just for fun, I used Chambray Pin Dots in indigo for the binding.

swiss dot mercer tunic_1_carolyn friedlander

The buttons were some that I picked up at Road to California earlier this year. It’s always fun to put something to use that I’ve been hanging on to.

swiss dot mercer tunic_2_carolyn friedlander

The second and third versions happened almost in tandem. There is a silk version (Radiance in peacock), which feels so luxurious to wear. The buttons are vintage goodies from my stash.

mercer tunic_silk 1_carolyn friedlander

I used the reverse–or matte–side of the silk so that it wouldn’t be too shiny.

mercer tunic_silk 2_carolyn friedlander

Also massively luxurious to wear is my next version in Liberty. Oh man. I’ve always loved this print and finally indulged in some while at Sarah’s Fabrics in Lawrence last September. This was the perfect project for it.

mercer tunic_liberty 1_carolyn friedlander

With the other versions, I simply serged my seams, but with this one I employed french seams. It’s not that French seems are any harder or that much more work, but I had the fit nailed down by this point, and I felt the Liberty deserved a super-clean finish.

mercer tunic_liberty 2_carolyn friedlander

Also in the tasty-lawn family, this next version is made out of some London Calling. It’s so soft and comfortable, and I really love the colors in this print. The navy-gingham buttons are more goodies that I’ve been waiting for the right time to use.

london calling mercer tunic_1_carolyn friedlander

With this one, I got just a little crazy and lengthened the back hem while also splitting the hem at the side seams.

london calling mercer tunic_2_carolyn friedlander

If the above are not already enough of an indication, I seem to be into tactilely-pleasing fabric choices at the moment. Maybe it’s because of it being summer or maybe it’s just because there are so many good options out there. Either way, it’s not a bad problem to have.

mercer tunics_5_carolyn friedlander

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