Archive | paper-piecing

Aerial Update And A New Version In My CF Grid Group Fabrics

I’ve been wanting to make a new Aerial quilt for quite some time. It was one of my early patterns, and one I’ve been eager to get back to. Here is my Aerial update.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander
photo by Alexis Wharem

The Design

The design is inspired by an imaginary view from above. It’s a fairly simple idea with loads of horizontal sections divided by diagonal slices and blocks of differing sizes.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

Technique and Fabric

The project is made using foundation paper piecing, which makes everything super easy and clean. You can work from 2 1/2″ strips. Bring on the scraps, yardage or whatever you have! I worked from the roll up of my newest CF Grid Group and a special Kona Cotton roll up that I put together to coordinate with it. To me this is a great example of how grayscale doesn’t necessarily mean lacking in color. Don’t you think?

CF Grid Group and Kona cotton fabrics for Aerial Update quilt . carolyn friedlander

Working With Other Substrates

Aerial works really well with solids and textural prints. It’s also great for working in other substrates, which was a big focus for me in my first version. Sewing onto the paper foundation stabilizes a variety of fabrics, making it easy by limiting stretch, drape or any other imbalance between the fabrics you are using. If you are new to foundation paper piecing and/or working with a variety of substrates, this is a great way to go.

Tip: Pre-wash and dry all fabrics when doing this to equalize any differences that might occur when laundering in the future.

The Aerial Update

I’ve updated the pattern to include the new sample. I made some tweaks to the blocks, and I changed out some of the project sizes so that the pattern includes four different size options; Throw, Runner, Wall and Baby. The pattern has six different blocks and coloring pages to map out your own version.

aerial quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Planning

In planning this project, I don’t tend to make an overall plan, instead I start with the fabrics and then I think about groupings of three fabrics for each block. I find that this helps break down many choices into something more manageable. Plus, it gives cohesion to each block and the quilt as a whole, while also making the sewing experience entertaining as I tried coming up with new three-fabric combinations for each block.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

There’s an optional “Block Yardage” listing in the fabric requirements that you can use to add cohesion or to provide extra wiggle room if you are new to paper piecing.

Project Details

Pattern: Aerial Quilt Pattern

Fabric(s): CF Grid Group and Kona Coordinates

Bonus: Aerial was also a design I used in my couch! Here’s part 1 and part 2.

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Rye Quilt Pattern

I LOVE a 2-color quilt, and my new Rye Quilt Pattern is all about that.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Originally inspired by a traditional friendship block that I discovered going through a friend’s old quilting stuff, I was drawn towards a set of geometric shapes that plays with your eye a bit. The design can read many different ways depending on the fabric choose and how you place it. I used prints from Jetty and Collection CF, but you can imagine how different this could play out with bold prints, solids and other choices.

It’s a simple idea, but there’s so much you can do with it.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

To play off the super graphic nature of these shapes, the pattern focuses on being a 2-color project. Of course you can totally use more colors, or you can even scrap it up within the colors. That would be neat! I wanted my first versions and the process described in the pattern to focus on just 2 tones.

In addition to the idea of 2 colors, the pattern also includes 2 different block sizes that can be used separately or together. Above is the larger block making a larger project–it’s easily a throw. The version below uses the smaller block in a smaller project. I also flipped the positions of the light and dark fabric which brings the design to life in a new way. (The pattern has some illustrations showing the differences so you can better visualize your options.)

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s something sophisticated and satisfying about a project like this. After making these two versions, I’ve already made a 3rd (you’ll see it soon or see some peeks here), and I’ve started a 4th. It’s the kind of project that I keep thinking about in my head as I think of new color and fabric combinations to try. I also really want to have a version on my bed. I think it would just look so nice.

Rye Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it, my new pattern Rye! What do you think about a 2-color quilt?

Pattern: Rye Quilt Pattern (The PDF version is available now, and you can ask about purchasing the print version at your local shop.)

Fabric: Large version uses a print from my Collection CF and Jetty collections (AFR-19933-399, AFR 19067-383). Small version uses 2 prints from Collection CF (AFR-19929-177, AFR-19931-16).

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Eads Quilt Along #2: Fabric Thoughts and Strategy.

Eads Quilt Along #2: Fabric Thoughts and Strategy.

First, I just have to say that this is really fun. So much of the time, I’m working on something in advance, and I can’t talk about it. But with this quilt along, I’m able to be a little more in step with you and share in the process.

Plus, it’s been incredibly fun watching you start your own projects and hearing your thoughts about fabric and moving forward. Some of you have more specific plans and some of you are taking things as they come. There is a lot on both sides resonating with me–which is inspiring–and I hope you’re enjoying that connection as well. You guys are awesome, and your work is shaping up in such wonderful ways!

Eads quilt blocks to start . Carolyn Friedlander

First up is a project flashback to my original Eads. This is the first block shot that I could find, so it’s more than 10 blocks, but I think it’s a good mood setter for this week. I’d like to point out the hot mess that is my sewing room. There are piles and piles of fabric on the floor, all of which are the options that I pondered for this version. While mess, stress and deadlines all loomed in the making of the original, it was still incredibly fun to make and figure out.

With my new project, things are different. There’s not really a deadline (other than this QAL…which might be one reason why I wanted to do it…ha!), and in terms of fabric, it’s a little bit of a blank slate there too.

Has anyone had issues getting started?

I did. In fact, while I find the beginning of any project to be exciting, the blankness of it can also feel overwhelming, especially once you start digging in and plotting out the specifics.

To start, the newest collection from UPPERCASE had me intrigued since I was lucky enough to come home with a bundle of it after Quilt Market. Top of mind is always a great place to start.

UPPERCASE volume 2 fabrics

I broke apart the bundle and started to play around with the colors and how they work together. Then I hit my own stash and started grabbing other things that were calling my name.

In the photo below, you can see how I first had the UPPERCASE bundle organized at the top, then below I started to mix pieces from that collection with the fabrics that I was pulling. At this point, I was also starting to figure out the relationships between the pieces.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of the green pieces were really speaking to me. In fact, these larger-scale florals were hitting on an idea of scale play that I wanted to explore after making my first Eads.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s not a ton of deliberateness that needs to happen at this stage. It’s mostly a step for seeing how different fabrics might work together.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

If you saw my instagram post from the weekend, you know that what actually started to shape up looks nothing like this pile. So, here’s the plot twist.

At this point, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. In fact, that’s kind of what was starting to happen to me. While I easily could have started off with some of the greens, there was starting to be too many possibilities, and I was over thinking it waaay too much.

So, what did I do? Well, this is where I like to embrace coincidence and intuition. There was actually another pile calling my name, and it was the recent leftovers from making 2 shirts.

kalle dress shirts . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a lesson in how it’s ok to let the fabrics pick you. I’d made these 2 Kalle shirts–the top in a print from Architextures and the bottom in a Liberty of London print. The scraps from both were sitting around looking so cute and enticing together that I figured they’d make a cool block. Off I went.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes it’s easier to start with something that’s already been started, or with something that isn’t so clean and pristine, because there’s much less pressure associated with it.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s what I did. And heads up, working from scraps is great, but it is definitely speedier working from the strips as outlined in the directions. I’m not complaining, but instead giving a heads up to any of you going this route. On the plus side, it does clean up the scrap pile!

After starting with these guys, I was able to get my creative juices flowing so that I could start thinking about the next fabrics to pull into the mix.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up was some Arroyo, a new collection by Erin Dollar printed on Robert Kaufman’s Essex. (I love this collection!) I’ll note that I had just made a shower curtain out of this print…are you sensing a theme?

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

And then I got brave enough to bust into some very treasured pieces that I picked up from Amitié while I was in Australia this past fall, along with a couple of pieces from carkai.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

So here’s where I’ll end this post with 10 blocks. I’m excited to be exploring some scale stuff–an area of initial intrigue–and I’m using some treasured fabrics in many of my favorite colors.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also awesome about this, is that I’m now seeing a way to connect back to the greens and other fabrics in my initial pull. Playing the intuition card is usually a good one. Even though I decided to change course, I figured that I’d be able to work my way back. I just needed a creative warm up to overcome the overwhelm.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Here are my tips for the week:

+ Overcome the overwhelm by just getting started! Grab the first 2 fabrics within eyesight, and I’ll bet they’ll help you over the hump. Also, trust your instincts.

+ When printing out your templates, select the “collate” option in the printer dialog so that A and B blocks alternate. This way you’re working evenly through your stack.

+ I noticed some folks wondering about fabric storage and organization for this project online this week. Create a box/tray/other designated vessel to house your blocks and fabrics for this project. (This route is a little more tidy than my floor method…see first pic.) Here’s a pic of a box that I’ve designated for my fabrics for this project. As for the blocks, they’re stored away nicely on my design wall.

Eads QAL fabrics

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Eads Quilt Along #1: Getting Started.

Eads Quilt Along #1: Getting Started.

You ready?

Let’s start with your sewing setup…or actually, let’s start by taking a look at mine.

Carolyn Friedlander Sewing Machine Set Up

Here’s my current sewing set-up. I’ve got my sewing machine set up on a big desk. It’s huge, which is awesome, because I can also fit my serger and coverstitch machine on it without any problems. Since we’re talking about paper piecing today, I’ll save the specifics on my serger/coverstitch setup for later, but the above pic gives you a nice overview. You’ll also notice that I have a small folding table to the left of my machine. This is awesome and so handy. It gives you cutting and pressing space while sewing, as well as quilt-resting space for when you’re quilting. (FYI it’s also where I throw my smaller, non-straight-stitch machine when I need to sew buttonholes.)

As for (paper piecing) tools, here we go.

Paper Piecing Supplies . Carolyn Friedlander

From left to right and up:

+ Flatter. Yep, I use this, especially since I designed the labels for the newest scent. (See next pic for closer look)

+ Mini iron by Clover. This is a new addition as of the most recent Quilt Market. I’m obsessed with this iron and mad at myself that I didn’t get one sooner. I bought it to use during the show, but it’s quickly become my go-to while working.

+ Small ironing board. This last Quilt Market seemed to up my supply ante as this and the mini iron were purchased to use at the show, and I cannot imagine sewing without either of them! This mini ironing board came from Ikea. It’s $5 and I covered it in some Blake. Small and portable. It can’t be beat.

+ Cutting mat. You’ll need one. This 18″x24″ fits perfectly on my folding table and lives there 99% of the time. Rotating cutting mats are handy, but for the Eads block, I’ll not be using one. Usually if I’m using a rotating mat, I’ll use it on top of this one anyway.

+ My Maine bookmark. A friend gave me this, and I love using it to fold back the paper. Anything else will work…an index card, the pattern itself, etc.

+ Xacto knife. I have many of these and use them to slice up my paper templates. You could use scissors too, but I like the speed and efficiency of an Xacto.

+ Paper scissors. Either these or an Xacto will be needed to slice up your templates.

+ Rotary cutter. Pick your fave. This one by Kai is lightweight and lovely. (Full disclosure, I have many rotary cutters in many sizes. This is my preference for paper piecing.)

+ Clover Roll & Press. I’ve not always been a fan of seam rollers until meeting this one. I love it. It’s lightweight and very effective. It also feels good in my hand.

+ Small scissors. No matter the project, you’ll always need a pair of small scissors for thread clipping and stuff like that. This one lives by my machine.

+ Pins and pincushion. Yep. Standard stuff. (FYI Cute Dumpling Pincushion pattern by Alchemy Tea.)

+ Thread. I use Aurifil 50wt cotton when I’m piecing. As for color, match to your lightest fabric.

+ Ruler. This neon, Omnigrid 4″x14″ ruler is one of my favorites. This particular size is perfect for the Eads project. With any ruler make sure the markings are clear and legible to you. Just to note, add-a-quarter rulers are well liked for paper piecing. Feel free to look into them if you’re interested. They are great, but my personal preference is a regular ruler, as it’s a multi-trick pony.

+ Fabric. You’ll need that! See back of pattern for amounts.

+ Paper templates (not pictured, but needed). There are MANY different papers for paper piecing out there. If you’re up for trying them out to see what works best for you–go for it. My preference is recycled office paper. It’s very available, it’s a little more responsible and I prefer its weight/thickness.

Paper Piecing Supplies . Carolyn Friedlander

Handy enough, this Clover mini iron comes with a mini spray bottle. The sprayer is surprisingly effective! I fill mine up with flatter and keep it nearby.

Carolyn Friedlander Sewing Machine Set Up

To take a closer look at my sewing set-up, I’d like to point out a couple of other things. First, an extension table–no matter the project–will make your (sewing) life much easier. Since my table doesn’t have a cut-out for my machine, the extension table expands the flat area of my sewing surface.

Carolyn Friedlander Sewing Machine Set Up

Let’s take a look at the floor for a sec, and not just because it’s freshly vacuumed, although that is a miracle to be captured! I’ve got 2 waste baskets to the right (both from Ikea). One is for fabric scraps and the other is for paper scraps. Since I do a lot of paper piecing, I like having a separate bin just for paper so that I can recycle it later.

Also of note down here is my new(ish) pedal for operating the thread cutter–hands free! I love my machine, but unlike some other straight stitch machines, the thread cutter function is only operable by the button on the front. After talking to some machine folks, we discovered a 3rd party foot pedal that works with this machine. It couldn’t be easier, you just plug it in (you must have the outlet on your machine–look for a hole with a scissor icon next to it) and start cutting. It’s life changing. I know that sounds dramatic, especially if your machine doesn’t have a thread cutter at all, but it is. One of my most prized functions is the automatic thread cutter, and the ability to operate it hands-free–yes! For information on this pedal, contact the folks at Pink Castle Fabrics. They helped me out, and they can help you out too.

I imagine that someone will ask me about a knee lift, I know that those are handy too, but the screw on mine broke, so until I get my act together and locate a replacement, it’s not part of my routine.

Carolyn Friedlander Sewing Machine Set Up

I’m a pin hoarder and like having different pins for different fabrics, projects, etc. It makes life easier to store different types in different pincushions. The above are from my Crew pattern.

I also love having these nesting boxes (pattern by Aneela Hoey) by my machine. They hold bigger scissors, my seam gauge, washi tape, wonder clips, marking tools, etc. There are so many handy things that you’ll want access to while you are sewing, and these nesting boxes are a pretty and functional way to house them.

Carolyn Friedlander Sewing Machine Set Up

To back up a bit, you’ll also notice a piece of foam core against the wall behind my machine. I have many of these panels floating around, and while originally purchased for something else, now I use them as design walls. This one is freshly blank, because I’m ready to fill it up with some Eads QAL action. Yeah!

Blake knit design wall . Carolyn Friedlander

Just to give you an idea, here’s one from when I was working on blake release projects. I love having multiples, because I am always working on multiple things happening at once–like I’m sure you are too. You can either purchase foam core panels like these, OR a cheaper option would be to hit up your local hardware store and grab some rigid insulation panels. They come in 4’x8′ sheets, and you can easily cut them down with an Xacto and/or cover them in batting.

Let’s talk about project planning.

Eads quilt project planning . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s the extent of my project planning for the first Eads that I made. After getting the design nailed down, I took colored pencils and markers to a layout and started exploring options. You can see that I didn’t spell everything out, I’d say that these explorations were more about getting a sense of the feel in terms of color and tone. After doing that, I made a block, just to see how that went. It was after this point that I pulled the rest of my fabrics.

Eads quilt fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

And yes, this is actually how I often to work and definitely how I worked things out for this project. While cutting out my strips (as outlined in the instructions), I laid them on the floor. You can start to build relationships between the different colors and prints this way, and it’ll also give you a good and visual sense of how your pickings are shaping up.

Of course, you may have a different way of working, so never feel bad about working in a direction that feels most comfortable to you!

OK, so I’ll stop here for now. But I’ll leave you with some tips:

+ Assess your sewing space. It’s good to be comfortable and have access to the things you need for a project.

+ Use the coloring sheet that is included with the pattern to start mapping out ideas and directions for your project.

+ Have FUN pulling fabrics. Assessing what you like and don’t like as you go helps better shape the project to your tastes and interests.

+ Ready to paper piece? Learn how from one of my videos on Creative Bug.

And one more thing. Let’s do a giveaway! I’ve got 4 fat quarters of my fabrics from a few different collections. Just leave a comment on this post sharing something special/helpful/non-helpful about your sewing space or favorite supply. I know you guys will have some worthwhile tips. I’ll pick a winner randomly on Monday, June 19 10am EST. Giveaway now closed–thanks to everyone for participating!

Carolyn Friedlander Fat Quarters

If you need a copy of the pattern, you can check quilt shops for the paper version or here for a digital version.

Share what’s happening on Instagram using #eadsQAL . I’m eager to see your progress!

Eads quilt along . Carolyn Friedlander

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Howard Block on Creative Bug.

Have you been following the Block-Of-The-Month series on Creative Bug? Well, it’s time for another block from me. Meet my Howard block.

Howard Block on Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s a somewhat speedy, architecturally-inspired block that is fun to whip up. I mixed and matched some of my prints from architextures and doe, but I can see things changed up in many different ways. In this class, you’ll learn how easy it is to paper piece this guy, and I’ll bet you can get a few whipped out easily in an afternoon.

So what do you think?

Happy Howard making!

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Paper-Pieced Quilts Part 1 on Creative Bug

Howdy! Today, the first part of my Paper-Pieced Quilts Class goes live on Creative Bug. (Here’s the link.)

Paper Pieced Quilt Class on Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve been pretty excited about this class, because the format is a bit longer–it’s a 2-part workalong, with the first part going live today and the next going live in 1 week. What’s cool about that is that I was able to cover more ground.

In the class, we start with designing the block, how to paper piece all of the blocks, assembling the top, quilting it(!) and binding it. It really is about making a quilt start to finish.

Paper Pieced Quilt Class On Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

The finished project is this wall hanging-sized quilt. But of course, it’s super easy to make larger by making more blocks if that’s your thing.

And you might recognize the fabric, it’s all Carkai, which was really fun to plan out.

Oh, and while I’m at it, I thought I’d share some of your work from my other Creative Bug classes (from applique and Polk) that I recently spotted. I’m LOVING what you guys are making!

(@nkroesen) | (@craftsouth)

(@houseonhillroad) | (@a__l)

I hope you find the class super informative and loads of fun. Let me know what you think!

 

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New Quilt Pattern: Envelopes.

First up is new Envelopes quilt pattern.

My new patterns seem to be on an E theme…

Envelopes, Ebb and Everglade–these are the new guys.

I’m a paper person and a letter person, which is exactly why it’s about time I made a move on an envelope-themed project. (In fact, here’s a fun trip down memory lane…)

Small Envelopes Quilt_Carolyn Friedlander

Cards, letters and envelopes are great for many reasons. The paper, the colors and the graphics can make them visually enticing, and then the message, thought and gesture can reach out to us on a personal level as well. Plus, the physicality of them makes such a distinct impact when so many things in our lives are digital.

As a quilt, the simple envelope shape can take on just as much as well. Change up the fabric, change up the color, change up the quilting–or even add embroidery or something that you fussy cut (both of which are included in the directions)–the end result is whatever message you are compelled to convey.

Envelopes quilt initial_Carolyn Friedlander

I created 2 block sizes for this project, so you can go mini or big. Above is the mini. It’s a fun and satisfying sew, especially when you’re playing with many different fabric combinations…which is exactly what I did. I made it a big mixing and matching game with all the new fabrics in Carkai. (Background fabric is Interweave Chambray in Denim.) Plus, the smaller block is perfect for adding a set of initials…which I eagerly added.

The big envelope block is a great size for a larger message (or fun fabric). In this version (also with Carkai), I made a signature quilt with the ladies in my local quilt group. (By the way, that’s the larger-scale print from Carkai in the background. When cut up and sewn, it just becomes a nice texture. You can also take note of how I used the special selvage from another of the designs from Carkai for the border in both projects. It’s fun.)

Envelopes quilt big signature . carolyn friedlander

I’ve always loved a signature quilt, and now that I’ve made one, I love them even more.  I had each gal in the group sign a block that I then embroidered on top of. Spending so much time with each of their signatures got me thinking a lot about signatures. They are so personal and unique to each person–each one really is like a portrait. Some were so polished and refined that I realized how sloppy my own handwriting has gotten, and so I’ve been on a little bit of a side mission to write more, especially in cursive. (You know what they say about practice…)

Carolyn Friedlander . Signature Envelopes quilt

So here’s Envelopes. I had so much fun making the cover samples, that I even whipped out a mini as a gift for a friend.

Fussy Cut Envelopes quilt_Carolyn Friedlander

I pulled as many fussy-cuttable fabrics from my stash along with many of my orange, red and blue fabrics (which I was surprised by how many I have! A good problem to have.), and in an afternoon I had the top all made up. It was one of those things where you just keep sewing, because you want to see how it’s going to turn out.

Fussy Cut Envelopes_detail_Carolyn Friedlander

You should be seeing this pattern popping up in your local and online shops now, and the PDF version is in my shop.

#envelopesquilt

#carkaifabric

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Summer Makes: Totem quilt.

totem quilt_soft and scrappy_2_carolyn friedlander

 

This is also something that I’ve gotten into this summer–another Totem (one of my new patterns this past spring). The fabrics that I am using are a soft and happy mixture of things–some architextures, botanics, gingham, dear stella, blueberry park, lotta, essex…and whatever else I have on hand.

 

totem quilt_soft and scrappy_1_carolyn friedlander

 

totem quilt_soft and scrappy_5_carolyn friedlander

 

totem quilt_soft and scrappy_4_carolyn friedlander

 

totem quilt_soft and scrappy_3_carolyn friedlander

 

I started this while I was up in Vermont earlier this summer and have a few more blocks to complete before I add the borders, which I haven’t decided on yet, but I might be leaning towards some Essex…

 

 

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Workshop with the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild.

 

Over the weekend, I did a workshop with the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild and had a great time! Here are some shots from the day.

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

making olive quilt at orlando modern quilt guild workshop

 

It’s always really fun to see what others make from my patterns!

Thanks so much to OMQG for having me (and for the nice post! ). You guys are great.

 

With that, I think I’ll start the holiday weekend off a little early this afternoon with some sewing. This clutch has been on my mind. BIG time.

 

Hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

 

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plugging back in.

quilts riding shotgun

quilts riding shotgun

It feels great to be back home, finally. My trip to Quilt Market was a wonderful adventure and only being able to work from an ipad was a great excuse to unplug a little bit, which I love. I continued my digital hiatus by spending the weekend unloading, unpacking, re-organizing, cleaning, and generally trying to get life back in order. I’m making progress. As a goal today, I’m facing the computer screen and my inbox, which doesn’t feel so bad since I’ve given myself some space from it. I kind of make these deals to myself. If I do this much of X, then I can do some of Y. Most recently Y is clothes sewing and the single girl. Remember this weekend project I started recently? I’ve finally got an update.

 

single girl update

 

Also, I have been getting ready for the follow-ups and the long list of thank-yous — more non-digital tasks that I enjoy. I’ve got a big stack of stamped stationery just waiting for the right sentiments.

 

art quilt stamped cards

 

Happy Memorial Day.

 

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miniMINI sunrise update.

Remember this weekend project from a little while ago?

 

Here’s an update.

 

miniMINI sunrise quilt

 

She’s all quilted, bound, and photographed. The orderly 1/4″ quilting, via my walking foot, gives it a nice texture without competing with the prints. I don’t always bind with the border fabric, but I liked the idea of keeping this one consistent. Of course, I had to break it up with a couple fabric scraps, and I am shocked that the hands came out perfectly positioned. Wish I could say I planned that.

 

miniMINI sunrise quilt binding detail

 

 

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