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Ray Quilt Along #3: Sew It Together.

Ray Quilt Along #3: Sew It Together.

Ray Quilt Along #3: Sew It Together

With everything cut out, let’s sew it together! This part always feels like I’m cleaning, because I’m taking a bunch of pieces off the floor and turning them into a single quilt top. So satisfying!

Here’s the video.

A fully-sewn-together quilt top is pretty satisfying, right?

Ray Quilt Along quilt top . carolyn friedlander
Ray Quilt Along quilt top . carolyn friedlander
Ray Quilt Along quilt top . carolyn friedlander

I may not be the best quilt holder, but you get the point. It’s bright and exuberant just like I wanted. Basting and quilting will be coming next!

Your homework for this week is to get your quilt top sewn together too. You can do this! Share what you are working on using the #cfRAYqal on Instagram. I love seeing it.

Supplies:

+ Cut pieces from Ray #2, sewing pins, seam roller, 1/4″ foot/Magnetic Seam Guide and/or Washi Tape, CF Handy Guide, sewing machine, iron, ironing board, wool pressing mat

Ray Quilt Along #3: Sew It Together (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #2: Cut It Out (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #1: Make A Plan (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Pattern

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Ray Quilt Along #2: Cut It Out.

Ray Quilt Along #2: Cut It Out.

This week, let’s cut everything out! Grab your fabrics and cutting guide, and let’s have some fun.

Here’s the video.

How about that? I’m pretty excited about where mine ended up, and I can’t wait to sew it together in the next video.

Ray Quilt Along 2: Cut It Out . Carolyn Friedlander

Your homework until next time is to get all of your fabrics cut out! And don’t forget to share what you are working on using the #cfRAYqal on Instagram. I’d love to see it.

Supplies:

+ Fabric, Cutting Mat, Rotary Cutter, Rulers (I’m using 8 1/2″ x 24
and 6 1/2″ x 6 1/2″), Marking Tools, Iron, Ironing Board, Sewing Machine, Thread, 1/4″ foot/Magnetic Seam Guide and/or Washi Tape, Seam Roller, CF Handy Guide

Note: My Long Leaf templates and pattern are coming to the shop soon!

Ray Quilt Along #2: Cut It Out (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #1: Make A Plan (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Pattern

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Scrappy CF Coasters

One set wasn’t enough, so here are some more scrappy CF coasters that I made recently.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Actually, I guess that I have a lot of these in the works. They can be made from a charm pack, and so I grabbed a stack of 5″ squares from Collection CF and started pairing the fabrics together in different ways and in different sets. The first grouping was this one, and here is another grouping in pinks, peaches and lilacs. If I let myself really dream a bit, I think it’d be lovely to make an entire set of these big stitch coasters in all of the colors.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Binding Selection

One thing that is a little different about this set from the first is that I used different binding fabrics on each of the coasters. There’s no right or wrong in deciding this, it’s all a matter of taste and what you are feeling. In a scrappy set like this, I think the variety is fun, and I love seeing how all of the different fabrics play out in the bias trim.

scrappy bias binding in collection CF
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Selecting Thread Colors

I quilted each coaster with a different color thread. This adds even more character and color to each coaster and to the set as a whole. The quilting becomes more engaging, because you can think about and explore using different colors as you go–an entertaining way to quilt, if you ask me.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

This is a great project to grow (or start growing) your big stitch quilting skills. I also think it’s a great way to explore different ways to pair fabrics and explore color. Plus, it’s something that you can use around the house or gift to a friend.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Binding Tips

If you haven’t seen it already, I have a new video that I posted on making the binding and how to attach it to the coasters. You can head over here to check it out.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Project Details

Fabric: Collection CF

Tutorials: Big Stitch Coaster Tutorial (here), Binding for Quilted Coasters video (here)

My favorite Hand Quilting tools.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

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How to Bind the Quilted Coasters

I’m delighted to have something new for you–a video on How To Bind the Quilted Coasters.

big stitch coasters . carolyn friedlander

The binding on my Big Stitch Coasters seems to be a sticking point for many, and so I’m happy to be able to show you exactly how I do it.

how to bind quilted coasters . carolyn friedlander

The video includes picking out your fabric, creating your own bias tape, and then I go through all of the steps for attaching it to your coasters. I like to sew the top by machine and then hand stitch it down on the back. I’ll mention some tips too on how I’d attach it all by machine if that’s something you’re curious about.

Of course there are a million ways to do just about anything in sewing, this is just the way that works for me. I’m hoping it helps you too!

Everything gets better with practice. Don’t feel bad if it takes a bit to get the hang of it.

Let me know what you think and happy binding!

Links:

+ Big Stitch Coasters Tutorial

+ Binding Tutorial (on YouTube)

+ Here’s a link to some of the supplies I used in the video that can be found in the shop: Clover Seam Roller, Thread Gloss, Aurifil Thread, Hand Sewing Needles, Kai small scissors, Kai medium scissors. (Oh, and a special Crew pincushion makes a cameo too.)

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Big Stitch Coasters in Collection CF

With the newest fabrics in Collection CF arriving in stores, I thought I’d share with you these new Big Stitch Coasters that I made in Collection CF.

The coasters are made using this free tutorial that I put together a few years back. (I’ve now given it a fresh update!) I use these coasters all the time, and they’re a fun thing to give away to friends.

big stitch coasters tutorial-stitch layers . carolyn friedlander

Small projects are perfect for trying out new techniques. If you’re wanting to give big stitch quilting a try, this is a great way to start. The commitment is small, and the possibilities are endless. Of course you could machine quilt them if handwork isn’t your thing, but I love the added color and texture of the big stitches.

It’s also a small and speedy project that can update something you use around the house, which I am all for. Or maybe you could send some to a friend to let them know you’re thinking of them. Both are worthwhile motives in my mind right now.

I made a point to update my favorite hand-quilting supplies, if you’re new to the game and want to find out more.

There are a couple more versions, but I’ll share them in a future post. Have fun!

Project Info

Tutorial: (Free) Big Stitch Coaster Tutorial

Fabric: Collection CF

Shop Supplies: Thread, Scissors, Needles, Marking Tools

+ Learn more about Hand Quilting Tools.

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Harriot Cargo Duffle.

I cannot take too much credit for this, but the Harriot Cargo Duffle is just adorable!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Rhiannon sewed this up, and she did a beautiful job working all kinds of cool tricks with the scallop print from Harriot.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

It’s such a fun detail that really spruces things up. I also like this bag makes use of the mixture of textures and patterns from the collection–grids, stripes, scallops, texture–bring it all on!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Robert Kaufman is planning to feature this project in an upcoming It’s Sew Friday, so stay tuned for that. I may need to follow along so I’ll have one for myself! It was hard having to give this one back.

The pattern is one of my favorite free ones from Anna Graham of Noodlehead. You can find it here on the Robert Kaufman website. I’ve made a couple of Cargo Duffles (here and here), and I think a new one might be in order.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

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A Batch Of Thread Catchers.

I did manage to crank out a batch of thread catchers for some of my local sewing buds. I’ve been wanting to do this for some time, and our holiday get together gave me the perfect excuse to do it.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Even with a lot going on, I was very glad to steal away a few hours to make a little something for each of them. And, most of the fabrics were leftovers from other recent projects that were sitting in piles needing to get sorted, so it was kind of like tidying the studio a bit too!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I used this tutorial to make a regular and a mini for each person. I’ve updated the tutorial to include both sizes. (Scroll down to the bottom of the tutorial for the adjustments to make the mini.) Personally, I like having both size options, because sometimes you need more and sometimes you need less. They each satisfy two different needs.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I probably could have made myself a couple more while I was at it, because I didn’t seem to have one handy a few times this week when I could have used one. Does anyone else end up with makeshift thread piles or is it just me?

Next time…

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

These guys are pretty speedy, and I really liked pairing up the different fabric combinations. In the end I let everyone pick their own. It was fun to see who picked what–many lined up as I thought they might and others surprised me a bit.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Lots of thread catchers!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

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Bartow Quilt Finally Finished.

This quilt top has been sitting around in the studio since 2014. But good news, this Bartow quilt is finally finished!

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Back in 2014 Robert Kaufman released a new batch of Kona solids, and my Bartow design became a pattern that I created for that release. (Free pattern here, and notes on the first version here.) I’m pretty sure that this version was my first version, or at least it was where I got inspiration for the design.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

At a Quilt Market around that time I saw a charm pack featuring a custom palette of Konas by Elizabeth Hartman. Elizabeth does a great job putting together colors, and I really liked this set and how they were arranged.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I wanted to have little slivers of all of the great colors transitioning in the same way that her charm pack was arranged across the quilt. Maybe it looks tricky, but it was pretty simple. I kept her colors in order and sewed them up by following the Bartow pattern. On my other Bartow quilt I kept the borders the same color as the background, but here I opted for colorful ones with a little bit of print mixed in. I think the borders here are mostly Flame Kona.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The top has been finished since 2014 and was sitting on a shelf in the studio. I dug it out and sent it off to Gina Pina to quilt. She quilted it up with a 1″ grid, and I just LOVE it.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the binding, I had it in my mind to use a piece from Friedlander Lawn, but as I was sewing it together I realized I had a scrap of Polk binding that would be perfect to mix in as well.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back is one of my Friedlander Wide prints. This colorway has been one of my favorites from that collection. It adds just the right pop to the back.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Feels good to have it finished!

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Bartow (free pattern from me via Robert Kaufman)

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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Quick Thread Catcher Tutorial.

quick thread catcher tutorial . carolyn friedlander

Yesterday I mentioned that I liked traveling with a little thread catcher, and so today I’m posting a quick thread catcher tutorial. This is based on one given to me by the sweet owners of the Janie Lou quilt shop in St Louis, Missouri. What I really like about it is that it folds up nice and flat, which makes it easy to bring with me anywhere. Plus, it’s silly how quick and easy it is to put together. I’ll be making many more of these for my sewing buds…

Materials: *NOTE, Mini size is listed in update below.

+ Exterior Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ Lining Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ (optional) Interfacing – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″ applied to Exterior.

Fabric/Interfacing Note: Neither of the thread catchers shown in this tutorial are interfaced. The one that I was given (above) has a sturdier canvas on the exterior. It’s nice. The one (outlined below) in this tutorial is made from un-interfaced quilting cotton for both the exterior and lining. I was mostly curious to see how it would turn out, and it’s surprisingly structured! I’m very pleased with it and will totally do it this way again. But of course, if you like interfacing, you can always incorporate it into your project.

All seam allowances are 1/4″. While I’m using my serger in this tutorial, you can just as well use your sewing machine. All raw edges will be enclosed, except where noted below.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold in half (RIGHT sides TOGETHER) so that short edges are aligned. In the photo below, my short sides are at the top, and the fold is on the bottom. Do this and the following for both the exterior and lining panels.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Pin (if desired) and stitch along the sides.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Create a boxed corner by pinching side seam to bottom fold on each side.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Mark a line 1 3/4″ from pointed edge. Stitch along this line.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Turn exterior (RIGHT side OUT).

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Place lining inside exterior, aligning side seams. Pin in place (if desired). Tip: Alternate the direction of the side seams when you match them up. This will make things less-bulky.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Stitch along top edge. A serger will finish this edge as you stitch, but if you’re using a sewing machine, you can use a zigzag stitch to finish it. Or, if you want to bind it, you can totally do that too, but since the top is folded, it isn’t super critical.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold the top down a couple of times, and you’re good to go!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

I hope you enjoy yours as much as I’ve enjoyed mine!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Dec 21, 2018 UPDATE – In my newsletter I outlined how to make a mini thread catcher, and so I thought I’d update the directions here as well. If you’d like to make a little mini, follow directions above but cut your Exterior and Lining fabrics to 4 1/2″ x 12″. Mark your boxed corner 1″ from point. There you have it!

Mini and Regular Thread Catcher . Carolyn Friedlander

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Fabric napkins for the win.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric napkins for the win. Are you a cloth-napkin user? I am and have been since college. In fact, I’ve been using the same cloth napkins since college, which means my cloth napkins are quite old. So old, that every time I find myself folding and putting them away I’m thinking–I should really make some new napkins… It’s always been one of those “some day” tasks, but finally, I’ve made myself some new fabric napkins, and it basically took no time at all.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

This is hardly even a weekend project. For me it was a I-need-a-break/distraction-to-feel-productive-for-maybe-an-hour kind of project. And boy are they.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Even though the colors look curated, they are the result of pulling fabric in order off my shelf, which I guess is curated…and in color order, but still. It was an easy effort. I grabbed and cut fabrics until I felt done grabbing and cutting, which apparently was 9 pieces.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

To back up a bit, the idea came after seeing these from Purl. For anyone wanting to follow a tutorial, you can totally follow that one, it’s good. On mine, I simplified the steps a bit and changed the overall size.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I first made a snip at 19″ with scissors and then ripped the full width of fabric, which means that my fabric was 19″ x width-of-fabric (44″ish in this case). Ripping the fabric ensures you’re following the grain of the fabric, which does make a difference when you’re planning for frayed edges. (Plus, ripping fabric is a surprisingly fun task.)

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I then threw those 19″ strips (ripped on 1 side) into the washing machine and dryer before ripping them into 18″ squares, by making a snip at 18″ and ripping each side, basing all subsequent sides on the first ripped side.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

After getting all of the squares made, I frayed the edges, but unlike the tutorial, I didn’t do an overall stitch around the sides. I figure the fraying will be fine. After you fray some edges, you start to see how unlikely more of it will be from becoming more un-frayed. Or, if it does become crazy in the future, I can always add some stitching. No prob.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Of course, some stitching could be a lovely decorative element if using a contrasting thread or interesting stitch. It all depends on the look you’re going for! In my case, it was a no-muss, no-fuss situation. I like the looseness.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

I know that some people have some concerns with fabric napkins. First, to address the wrinkle issue, these napkins haven’t been ironed at all. I took them straight from the dryer, ripped to size and then just hand smoothed them before this photo shoot. Not bad, huh?

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

And this was just the first wash, they’ll get softer and softer with each wash. If you’re into ironing or have some guests to impress, you could certainly give them a good press before setting them out. Otherwise, I find them to be totally acceptable straight from the dryer.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Another question about fabric napkins has to do with stains. This is a good question since you will be using them around food. There are a few ways you could look at it. First, if you’re really concerned about stains, you could just pick out really dark and/or busy fabrics that could easily camo some stains. Second, I haven’t noticed too many stains that really stick in my experience with cloth napkins, and I’ve been a cloth napkin user for almost 15 years. Third, if you do happen to get a pesky and unrelenting stain, just make a new one! This is a low-commitment project that only gets better and more exciting with new fabric.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabrics included are from my collections, friedlander, architextures and doe.

Yay for fabric napkins!

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Needle-turn Applique Class with Creative Bug.

Good news, my first class with Creative Bug is now live–yay! It’s all about one of my favorite techniques–needle-turn applique.

Carolyn Friedlander's Needle-Turn Applique Class with Creative Bug

I filmed with Creative Bug last August, and have been eager to share with you the fruits of our labor. The Creative Bug team is incredibly talented and passionate about what they do, which is why I was thrilled to get the chance to work with them.

In this first class, I show you how I like to do needle-turn applique in an Hawaiian-inspired block which features fabrics from my newest collection, Carkai.

I hope you like it!

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