Tag Archives | acrylic templates

Using the Arlo Templates

I thought it’d be fun to put together a little post on using the Arlo templates. They are a completely optional add-on to the project–all shapes needed are included on paper in the pattern–but I find the acrylic option to make things much easier.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

First off, there are two different sets to choose from–1/4″ and 3/8″. Either option will work to make the project; it basically comes down to a matter of personal preference and how you plan to sew it together as to which option to pick.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Since there is some flexibility as to how to sew the the project together–be it by machine, by hand or by using English Paper Piecing (EPP)–you might have a preference on your seam allowance as well. For that reason, I created the 2 template options as well as wrote the pattern requirements on the pattern for both options.

Which to choose? If you’re normally a machine piecer and you’re comfortable with a 1/4″ seam allowance, I’d go with the 1/4″ option. In fact, that’s what I like to use when I’m doing this project. But, if you’re a hand piecer with a 3/8″ preference, or you like to set up your EPP this way, or if you just prefer a slightly larger seam allowance, then you’d be more happy with the 3/8″ option.

Both template set options have all of the pieces you need, are super sturdy and have the relevant reference lines and drilled holes to help you put together your project.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

Once you have your set picked out, here are some tips for how I like to use them.

You can use the templates to trace out all of your shapes before cutting them out, or you can use them to mark and cut as you go. Feel free to try both ways and see which way you like best. If I’m cutting around the template, I’ll either move my mat toward an edge of my cutting table so I can cut from a few sides without repositioning, or I find using a rotating cutting mat to be handy too.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

Cut around all sides. Larger rotary cutters can work, but I like using a 28mm cutter with this project because it cuts to just what you need cut.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

After cutting all of the sides, you can mark your points at the holes. (Take note that I’m doing this on the Wrong Side of the fabric.)

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

I like having a seam allowance marked, so after marking where the holes are, I’ll slide the straight edge of the template down and connect all of the dots. This is totally optional and depends on your personal preference.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

Now you have nicely cut and marked pieces ready to go.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

The issue of marking tools is an important one. Actually, I think the issue of marking tools is always important. For Arlo, it’s important to consider two things: You’re marking the wrong side of the fabric, and depending on how you sew it, you might be ironing the pieces (and still be needing the markings).

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

I tried many different marking tools when I was working on my project, and here are some of what I found to work.

marking tools

First, I have a big disclaimer; Because I was using all dark fabrics, it didn’t matter to me if any of the markings were removable. On dark fabric, and with marking the wrong side, you’d never see the markings.

The next thing is that I knew I’d be ironing the pieces while still wanting the markings. For this reason I didn’t want to use any marking tool that can be removed by heat or time. With those conditions, here are some options that I found to work. (From top to bottom in the above picture.)

Muji Gel Ink 0.5mm pens are one of my favorites. There are many color options, and they glide across the fabric nicely. (Note: These are not removable.)

These white felt pens were also my favorite. The ink showed up really nicely on dark fabrics, and the markings were clear and easy to trace on the fabric. They say that they are water soluble, but I haven’t tested that.

I did all of my marking for Arlo with these first two pens, but here are some others that I’ve found to work as well.

Uni-Ball Signo DX 0.38mm – Another ink pen option with a lot of colors to choose from. These are finer than the Muji ones. (Note: These are not removable.)

Clover 0.7mm mechanical quilting pencil – I am having a hard time finding a link for this exact one, but other brands make something similar. It’s basically a mechanical pencil, see next rec.

Bic 0.7mm #2 pencil (variety pack link, see note below) – I love these, and they work. You might be able to erase the marks, but do a test to double check first.

Sewline white lead – You can definitely get the mechanical pencil and lead set, but somehow I found myself with just the lead refills and no appropriate holder. Because the refills are 0.9mm they’ll fit perfectly in any 0.9 mechanical pencil. I put mine in one of the Bic holders (variety pack noted above has the 0.9mm size), and it works great. I put a white piece of tape around it so I know I have white lead inside.

Sewline white click pencil – Same effect as some of the others, but with a thicker lead.

There are so many marking tools out there! These are just some that I’ve tried and found to be conducive to using the templates. Any marking tool comes with caveats, so always beware and always test what you’re using on your fabric first.

What are some of your favorite marking tools? In addition to scanning the notions wall at your local quilt shop, I find talking to other quilters helps too!

There we have it, how-to use the templates for my Arlo pattern!

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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My Arlo quilt pattern.

Now that my Instead fabric collection is shipping to stores, I thought I’d take a little time to share more with you about my Arlo quilt pattern. This project was hard to keep under wraps at the time, because I was so delighted at each stage to see it come together.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I’d been wanting to play around with the classic hexagon for awhile, and this project is the result of that.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I always say this, but it’s so true–my favorite patterns are the ones where you can do a million things with them. Rather than having a design that only works in a few ways, I love it when a design lends itself to changes in fabric, color, block orientation, and/or the quilting. It’s always amazing and exciting to me when you can totally change up the look, although this gets me into trouble because I end up making multiple versions of many of my projects. I can’t help it!

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Arlo is definitely a design that can take on some different looks. In this first version, I used all of my newest Instead fabrics and the coordinating solids. The coordinating solids are a super-textured mix of Essex linen, yarn-dyed linen and even a metallic linen. I thought this rich mix of texture compliments the dark palette of the collection in a really good way.

Instead Fabric and Solid Coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

The pattern works well with fat quarters, which is what I used here. First, I organized my stack of fabrics in to a pleasing order. I knew I wanted some color organization to this project, and to start it off with some clarity would help me achieve those results. Then I cut the shapes from each of the fabrics and stacked them up. (PS, I discovered that this shoe bin from Target holds the cut shapes nicely!)

After everything was cut, I started sewing the shapes together by pulling from the stack. Again, I knew that working this way would help me achieve some of the color order that I wanted. I also knew that once I had my hexagons sewn together it would be easy at that stage to nail down the layout.

The layout was SO much fun! (Does anyone else look forward to laying out the blocks for the first time? I think it’s such a treat.) I used all of the different block options but oriented them to slant in a similar way across the quilt. I think that the repetition of the colors through different shapes plays in an interesting way across the quilt.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

After getting a layout that worked for me, I finished sewing the top together, and then I used big stitch hand quilting to finish it off. I like how the texture of the quilting threads and of the hand quilting give it a really nice feel.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I like seeing the colors of the threads pop, and I like the contrast in the fabrics. The printed pieces from the collection next to the textured linens keep it interesting. I always think about how the quilt will lay on your lap, and this one especially gives you many different things to notice and see each time you settle in with it.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This pattern can be sewn together in several ways depending on your preference. For this one, I chose to machine piece the top and then to hand quilt it. You could also hand piece the blocks OR English paper piece (EPP) them as well. Instructions for each option are outlined in the pattern, and there’s a printable EPP page so you can work from your preferred template papers.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All templates for the blocks are included in the pattern, but I also have 2 acrylic template sets to offer as well. One set includes a 1/4″ seam allowance and the other set includes a 3/8″ seam allowance. Choose your preference based on what you’re most comfortable with. Since I was machine sewing mine, I used the 1/4″ seam allowance, but maybe you like hand piecing and you’re comfortable with 3/8″–you can use that too.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

Each template is made from sturdy acrylic and features printed lines and drilled holes so you can cut and mark from them at the same time. (Stay tuned for another post that I have planned on how I like to use the templates.)

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it–my new Arlo Quilt pattern.

I’ve mentioned the possibility of doing an Arlo Quilt Along, but I’m curious–what do you think? I was hoping I’d be able to squeeze it in this August/September, but I’m going to have to push it back a little farther. Would you be game? What would you like to see during this quilt along? Leave any feedback in a comment below or in an email to me – info(at)carolynfriedlander(dot)com. I always appreciate hearing from you!

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Arlo Quilt Pattern

Acrylic Template(s): 1/4″ Seam Allowance Set, 3/8″ Seam Allowance Set

Fabrics: Instead and Instead coordinating solids (Note: I’ve been seeing many stores receiving these fabrics recently. If you’re looking for some options, I find google to be the easiest way to do that. Here’s a google search that I did. I hope that’s helpful!)

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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Best of 2018 + a giveaway

Best of 2018 + a giveaway

2018 mighty lucky . carolyn friedlandercarolyn friedlander cf project bag wainwright matchaWainwright Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlanderwainwright AL . carolyn friedlanderEnvelopes Workshop . Carolyn FriedlanderPolk Fabric . Carolyn FriedlanderPolk Fabric Clothes . Carolyn FriedlanderLusk Quilts . Carolyn FriedlanderDavie Quilt in Polk Fabric . Carolyn FriedlanderBabson Quilt . Carolyn FriedlanderPolk Park Quilt . Carolyn FriedlanderPolk Minimalist Wallet . Carolyn FriedlanderMount HoodQuilt Market Portland 2018 . Carolyn FriedlanderSeattle Public Librarycf mini QAL . carolyn friedlandercf mini QAL . carolyn friedlanderDavie Quilt Blocks . Carolyn Friedlandercf mini QAL . carolyn friedlanderMini Thread Catcher . Carolyn FriedlanderFancy Tiger CraftsFancy Tiger Crafts . Carolyn FriedlanderHarriot Fabric . Carolyn FriedlanderHunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn FriedlanderHarriot Fabric . Carolyn FriedlanderHunt Quilt NO Seam Allowance Acrylic Template . Carolyn FriedlanderLott Quilts . Carolyn FriedlanderHunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlanderblue babson project bag . carolyn friedlanderCollaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlandertwenty eighteen . carolyn friedlander2018 quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

If you haven’t taken a moment to look back on 2018, I encourage you to do it! Whether it’s looking back through your calendar, flipping through photos on your phone or compiling a nice spread of images, it can be as easy as you want it to be. I’ll admit that I often come into the New Year feeling a little overwhelmed by everything I want to do. Looking back has this magical way of relaxing me a bit, and it gets me excited to see how the new year unfolds.

As for 2018, here are some highlights:

+ New Patterns – Lusk, Davie, Babson, Hunt, Lott Quilts (A, B/C and D), and Mini Eads

+ Acrylic Templates(!!) for Hunt.

+ New Fabric – Polk and Harriot, plus new Architextures Wide and a special bundle of Kona Cotton Solids

+ Special collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss

+ Two new project bags

+ Some Quilt Alongs – WainwrightAL, CF Mini Along, Start With A Finish QAL

And now for a giveaway. To enter, leave a comment below about a highlight for you in 2018 and/or something you’re looking forward to in 2019. I’ll select 6 winners at random to receive some of the goodies below on Monday, January 7, 2019 10am Eastern. Giveaway closed–thanks to everyone for entering!

best of 2018 carolyn friedlander

Thanks for all of your support this year! I wish you all the very best in 2019.


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