Tag Archives | aerial grove quilt

cf Mini QAL #5: Gradation.

cf Mini QAL #5: Gradation.

How was last week?

Here’s what I made.

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This week, my focus was on Davie. With last week’s challenge being about all colors, I tried not to over think my fabric and color choices, which is easy to do when anything is an option. Instead I went with my gut as I started looking through fabric. I pulled several different things, and laid them out loosely focusing on groupings of 4 since the Davie blocks require that many fabrics for each of the block sections.

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Even though my goal was to make 4 blocks, I didn’t pick all 4 groupings at the beginning–although you totally could. Instead, I made the first block with the first 4 fabrics that I liked, which was the bright yellow house with a brown roof in the middle. My subsequent block selections grew from there based on how I was seeing each block shape up.

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Also, I’ve been wanting to play a bit with mixing up the background sections in this block, and so I inserted a little accent of something here and there in pretty much all of the blocks. I think it’s kind of fun!

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This was a really fun week, and I’m actually looking to build from it in moving forward with the next challenge.

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Our next challenge focuses on Gradation. Gradations can be lots of fun to put together and incredibly impactful. Here are some examples to consider.

Savor Each Stitch_Aerial Grove_Carolyn Friedlander

The Aerial Grove project from my book is a good one for employing a gradation. I love projects with little bits of a lot of different things, and this one captures that idea and uses gradation to organize those colors for maximum impact. Above is the version in the book, and below is a version using only Kona solids.

Aerial Grove quilt_1_Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made so many versions of this project mostly because I love picking out the colors and figuring out how to arrange them.

Ebb is similar in that it also is a great way to show many different colors and how they can transition in fun ways.

ebb quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

This recent version of Sessoms also creates a gradation from all of the fabrics in Gleaned.

Sessoms Throw Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

And here’s a new one that you haven’t seen yet. How about this Lusk mini that I also made in Gleaned?

Gleaned Lusk . Carolyn Friedlander

I had a mini-charm pack of Gleaned that I decided to turn it into a mini. I paired the fabrics in the collection with Olive Essex Yarn Dyed. To make the gradation, I simply worked the blocks in order from the mini-charm pack. That’s a tip–if you have trouble arranging your fabrics, try working from a precut, because they’re usually arranged in a pleasing gradation of some sort.

Gleaned Lusk . Carolyn Friedlander

Creating a gradation doesn’t necessarily mean you have to create a rainbow from red to purple. You can also think of a gradation as a way to tell a story, from light to dark, from blue to yellow–from anything you want! Here’s one more example that I crowdsourced from @bastingbeauty. It’s just too pretty not to share. I love the creativity of not only the design but of also the fabric use and way it transitions! It also gives you a bit of a transparency effect too.

@bastingbeauty

This week, have fun figuring out a gradation–in whatever way you’d like!

Gleaned Lusk . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ Not good with creating a gradation? Buy a precut and use it in order. OR, stalk a precut that you find attractive and take notes on which colors are being used and which order they are being used in. You can do it.

+ Gradations do not have to be a full spectrum and in rainbow order. If the standard isn’t speaking to you, come up with your own color story and define your own limits.

+ On a technical note, I’m sure you’ve noticed that these little seams can be get a little bulky. This is why I usually try pressing them flat in order to even out the bulk as much as possible. While first working on Davie, I realized that using a seam roller to open out the seam first, made it much easier to iron open and achieve a good press. I’m glad to see some of you noticing this handy trick too!

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

cf mini quilt along . carolyn friedlander

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Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I finished this guy. Finally. And it was fun. Here’s a look at my Aerial Grove in Liberty and chambray that I started a little while ago (107 weeks according to Instagram) … with status updates here, here, here, here and most recently here. Wow. Lots of updates. But I guess that’s what happens when you can take your time with something. That last shot was taken when I finally decided to finish it up, and for good reason, because I was going to give it away.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This pattern is a project from my book and one that I’ve now made several times. This version is full of Liberty prints and lots of chambrays and denims.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

One bonus of not finishing this sooner is that I was able to incorporate some euclid.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is such a play on texture, both in the fabrics and the quilting. Liberty lawn is so fine and soft, which makes it seem almost delicate. And the chambrays and denims have a heavier look and feel, but they’re also soft and very textured. I wanted the quilting to enhance that softness and create even more texture. Plus, since I used big stitch, there’s an added layer of color in the quilting too.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I even threw in a leftover Hesperides block. The colors, fabrics and shapes worked, and it wasn’t otherwise being used.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This version is the first that I’ve made with a darker background. (Seen next to my Kona version.)

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back, I went with this lighter blue Widescreen. I like that it adds color, and you’re also able to see the quilting.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : Aerial Grove from Savor Each Stitch

Fabrics : Liberty for the appliqués, denims and chambrays (from Robert Kaufman), euclid, swiss dot chambray, leftover nani iro for the backgrounds, Widescreen for backing.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

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Scrappy Collection and Liberty Aerial Grove Quilts.

Something about the New Year has had a positive influence on getting some WIPs back into rotation. My Scrappy Collection and Liberty Aerial Grove quilts are two of my favorites. Both of these are totally personal projects, meaning they have no deadline and no intended purpose other than for my own pure enjoyment.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

First up is my scrappy collection quilt that I started shortly after this most recent Spring Market in May 2015. (See blog posts here and here.) As predicted in the last post, it had to go into hibernation while I worked on the carkai and fall pattern release. But as soon as all of that and some end-of-year madness was over, my scrappy collection quilt was one of the very first personal projects that I pulled back out. In fact, this is what my New Year’s Day in the studio looked like.

scrappy collection quilt borders. carolyn friedlander

It was a fun day of pull-everything-out-and-throw-it-on-the-floor to decide what to use for borders and what to use for backing. I decided to add enough borders to make it bed sized. To do that, I used more printed fabric from my stash as well as a print from carkai to surround the assembled blocks.

As for the back, I initially hoped my new Widescreen fabrics would be in. The light blue seemed like it’d be perfect for the back. But alas, they weren’t and I didn’t want to wait. With personal projects, it is best to strike when the iron is hot, because you never know what will be needing your attention later. What I ended up with felt pretty exciting. I scrapped it up with some carkai, some doe and a big piece of Kona highlight.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

While making my first Collection quilt, I initially felt the urge to hand quilt it…entirely. Unfortunately timing didn’t allow for that, so it became a hybrid of hand and machine quilting, which I was happy with in the end. With this one, I’ve always figured that I’d hand quilt it, but now that I’ve started, I can’t stop thinking about throwing in some machine work too. We’ll see. I’m open to basing all decisions on what feels right as I go.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Liberty Aerial Grove. Also a favorite, and also one that’s been sitting on the shelf. (See previous updates here, here, here and here.)

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This one was started over a year ago. It’s one of the projects in Savor Each Stitch, and something I teach fairly often. In fact, I totally got the idea for this version after one of my students brought Liberty to work on in class. I LOVED the idea, because it seemed like an amazing way to use these beautiful fabrics. Liberty can be an indulgence to partake of at the fabric store, which is why a project that uses small amounts of it can be smart and economical. Plus, the many beautiful small-scale prints work so well in a project like this. Depending on what you decide to do with the background or layout, you will show them right off.

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My backgrounds are a textured mix of chambrays, Essex linen, railroad denims and my printed quilting cottons (architextures, doe). I like how the rich blues set off the pretty prints.

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Originally, I was just going to do as many rows as the project in the book has, but after collecting bits I ended up with enough to make a couple of extra rows. There are 6 rows photographed here, but I just finished appliquéing a 7th. While I wouldn’t be upset about cutting out fabrics for an 8th row, I think it’s time to call this guy done and move on to the borders to finish up the top.

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