Tag Archives | applique

WainwrightAL #1: The Pattern and The Plan.

WainwrightAL #1: The Pattern and The Plan.

To kick things off, I thought it would be appropriate to talk a bit more about the pattern, and then my plan for moving forward with my own project as well as in general. Plans are good, being excited about them might be better.

First, the pattern. Wainwright was inspired by and named after the Wainwright building in St Louis. If you’ve seen it or other Louis Sullivan buildings, you know that the ornamentation is incredible. There are so many beautiful motifs, and it was easy to become very inspired.

Wainwright Building . St Louis, Missouri

As a quilt, I love appliqué patterns that offer a lot of design possibilities, are fun to sew (because you’ll be getting right in there with it), and can be easy to travel with. With this one, I went for all of that by taking one basic motif and breaking it up in a way that could be mixed and matched among the blocks and with few or many fabrics.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Appliqué projects are always great for finding new color and fabric combinations, because once you cut out the shapes and layer them on a background, you can actually see what it’s basically going to look like. How cool is that? If you aren’t liking it, you can easily make a change by swapping out the background or by changing the appliqué (the top layer, or the shape). This is probably why I always have SO many appliqué projects cut out–because it’s way too tempting to cut them out to see what an idea will look like.

With this first version, I was most excited about using my new Gleaned collection and its coordinates. I used pieces from all of it.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

Appliqué projects can be great for fussy cutting motifs and making use of special stuff–like the special selvage treatment in some of my newest prints from Gleaned. You can see snippets of this stuff in many of my blocks.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

If you’re planning to take advantage of this, just make sure to position any special motifs where you want them in the squares that you’ll be cutting out. Both the background and appliqué pieces are cut from regular squares, so you can use the shape and size of the square to get your fabric positioned how you want it. Just keep in mind your 1/4″ seam allowances for sewing the blocks together and the 1/8″ seam allowances for appliqué (which yes, is plenty of seam allowance).

Back to the project.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There are two block sizes to this project–small and big. This first version uses only small blocks.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The small blocks are nice for a few reasons. First, you will need more of them, which means you can incorporate more fabric combinations and pairings. Second, smaller-sized blocks are pretty easy to handle and relatively speedier than larger ones.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The pattern also includes a larger-block option, which is what I incorporated into the second version that I made.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In this version, you can see how the sizes compare, because I used them together. I sized the blocks specifically to work this way, but of course, you can use them however you’d like! Just how my first version uses all small blocks, you can totally make a version with all big blocks. Or, you can mix them up. The possibilities are yours.

Big blocks are great because fewer of them make a larger project. They can also be a better format if you’re working with a larger print, and expanded shapes mean everything is extruded and therefore slightly easier technically if you’re just getting into the technique. If you’re curious, try one of each, and see what you think.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll also notice that in this version I took a totally different route with the fabric. Instead of using tons of different fabrics, I used only two–this from Gleaned and this coordinate. The cool thing about this approach is that it really emphasizes the variety of shapes and sizes in the design.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The main thing that you can keep in mind with regard to either option is that the pieces cut from 1 appliqué square can be used for 2 blocks. Split them up and mix them about as you wish!

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now that you’ve seen my two versions, I hope that you’re excited to start mapping out your own! As for me, I’m planning to use small blocks in my next version–I love this size. To be totally upfront, I’m not entirely sure what final size (or even project type) that I am going for. I might make a pair of pillow shams…or I might do a wall hanging…I don’t know. I’m leaving that decision for later since I know I can adjust things as I go. I do have some fabrics pulled, but I think I’ll save that for next week.

Finally, I don’t want anyone stressing over this project. Handwork is usually my way to relax, and so I want this WainwrightAL to foster that same mood for you. Personally, I really liked the idea of using this QAL as a way to have an enjoyable something to work on in the background of my own life, and I hope that you find it fitting nicely into your life as well. Let’s use this time together to have fun, to enjoy each other and to enjoy playing with our fabric.

If you still need a copy of the pattern, you can find one here or checking with your local shop or favorite online retailer.

Wainwright quilt in Gleaned Fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ The project layout pages can totally be used as coloring pages. Either make copies as needed, OR use tracing paper over the top of them (since the layouts are already shaded) to explore your color/fabric ideas!

+ If you’re stalling out over fabric/color ideas, I always just go with my gut. Pulling fabric for a new project is massively exciting, but it can easily get out of control and lead to project paralysis. Instead of getting overwhelmed, take a step back and think about what’s most exciting to you. Start there, you can always make changes and adapt as you move along.

+ If you’re new to appliqué, not to worry! It’s fun and shouldn’t be intimidating. Everything gets easier with practice, especially this. This project is also perfect for anyone just getting started. I won’t be going over the exact technique since it’s outlined in the pattern, but I do have some classes on Creative Bug that fully walk you through the process. Here’s a link to my classes on Creative Bug.

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Wainwright Quilt Along Announcement.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Hi, hi! Are you in the mood for some handwork? I am, or maybe it’s safe to say that I pretty much am always in the mood. It’s relaxing…and fun…and portable.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

While I love handwork, I know that many of you love handwork too. I also know that many of you are curious about handwork, and so I’ve been thinking that a Wainwright Quilt Along could help get us all going. After doing the Eads QAL last year, I knew that I wanted to plan more QAL adventures for this year. I’m happy to announce that the Wainwright Quilt Along will be up first!

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My new pattern Wainwright was a lot of fun to put together. It’s about playing with color, shape and all kinds of possibilities. Each of the appliqué shapes can be shared and mixed between blocks. Plus, there are two different block sizes, which means you can pick one or the other (big or small) OR you can mix and match them both, because I deliberately sized them to work together. I always think that the more possibilities in a project, the better. No worries if any of that sounds daunting! We’ll cover it in the coming weeks, for sure.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Next week (February 15) will be the start of the Wainwright Quilt Along, and I have 6 weeks planned, with a wrap up on March 22. My plan isn’t necessarily to have a finished top by the end of 6 weeks–although that could totally be your goal!–but instead, I’m thinking of using 6 weeks to get some blocks rolling, talk about handwork, and just generally participate with you in some hand sewing. Whether you’re in the midst of winter (my fellow Northern Hemisphere folks!) and trapped indoors, or if summer is upon you (hi, Southern Hemisphere-ies!) and you’re looking for projects to travel around with, handwork is always handy, and I hope that this will be a delight to add into your schedule.

Wainwright Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

You can grab a copy of the pattern here, or at stores (that’s just a link to a google search, but you could also ask your local shop!).

You in?

Wainwright Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

Let’s go!

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Kai Scissors in the Shop and a Look at My Favorite Scissors.

Kai 7230 Scissors

In all of my appliqué classes, we start with a little tool talk. I’m not one to push too many tools, but in cases where it’s important, I do. With handwork, this is especially true, because you can literally feel the impact of everything that you are using.

Kai 7000 series scissors

While scissors are essential when sewing, they are especially critical with appliqué–or at least in how I do a lot of my appliqué since it often involves cutting multiple layers of intricate shapes at once. It’s in cases like this where you really notice which tools are working and which ones aren’t.

It wasn’t until I was demo-ing at an event when my previous scissors failed in front of a class. That was embarrassing! At home, it can be easy to write things off as not a huge deal, but when you’re showing someone else how to do something, it’s suddenly very clear when something isn’t working. My scissors weren’t cutting to the tip, and I was very annoyed.

After that, I was on a mission to find something that would work better, and not to bore you with the details, I ended up finding exactly what I needed in Kai. The brand is incredible, their products are of the best quality, and most importantly, they stand by their product. If anything gets dull or worn down, you can send it in, and they’ll sharpen it for you at a reasonable cost. Since my previous pair of scissors could not be sharpened, I was especially enticed by something that I wouldn’t need to buy again.

At the risk of this post feeling like an infomercial, I still wanted to share it all with you, because I get asked this stuff all of the time. Since they’ve made such a big difference for me, I decided to start carrying my favorites in the shop. With them being a super new addition, I thought I’d go over what we’ve got.

Yay, for Kai!

Kai 7230 Scissors

First up is my first pair. After trying everything on their demo table, I arrived at the 9″ tailoring shears, and I’m happy to report that years later they are still my favorite–and they actually haven’t needed sharpening yet. Bonus.

Kai 7230 Scissors

It’s the right size for cutting my appliqué projects, the blades are super sharp and the cut is incredibly smooth. If you have plans to start a Kai arsenal, this is definitely my recommended first purchase.

Kai 7230 Scissors

We can continue chronologically, because somehow my own arsenal has grown parallel to how I’d prioritize them. Of course, your needs might be different, but hopefully this will give you an idea!

My next couple of pairs were their basic 4″ scissors. I grabbed up both their regular and serrated options. After getting just 1 of each, I realized I needed a pair for every handwork spot in my house and every travel bag. They’re lightweight, sharp and perfectly handy for thread clipping and fabric snipping.

Kai 5100 Scissor

Serrated vs non-serrated is a question of preference that I’m not sure I’ve ever decided on. I guess I don’t need to draw any conclusions, because I have and use both, all the time. A serrated blade grips the fabric as it cuts, and a smooth blade glides as it cuts.

Kai 5100 Scissor

A couple of years ago, Kai added a couple of smaller sizes to their 7000 series–my favorite series–which in my opinion, was exactly the right move. I quickly grabbed up all sizes to try.

These first two (7170 and 7150) are really great. They fill the need for a 7230-like scissor, but smaller, for those more intricate cuts. For projects like Alturas, these are my preference.

The 7170 has a 6 2/3″ blade and is a little bit longer.

Kai 7170 Scissor

The added length of this pair might make me like them slightly more than the 7150, but they are both really great.

Kai 7170 Scissor

By the way, both the 7170 and 7150 are great for clipping fabrics when garment sewing. Garment fabrics range from anything thick to thin, stretchy to super stable, and so I always have one of these nearby when I’m cutting out a garment. (Sidenote if you’re curious, I usually cut out garments with a rotary cutter, flat on my cutting table. I use scissors like these for snipping match points, grading seams, etc.)

Kai 7000 series scissors

The 7150 has a 6″ blade, so it’s just slightly shorter, but also super good.

Kai 7150 Scissor

A lot of this just comes down to your own preference when cutting. A shorter blade gives you more control on smaller, more intricate shapes, whereas a longer blade allows you to cut further more smoothly.

Kai 7150 Scissor

Last up is the 7100, which is a 4 1/4″ blade. These are like the luxurious version of the 5100. They’re a bit beefier, the handles are much more comfortable and the blades are of the same high-quality as the other 7000 series scissors.

Kai 7100 Scissor

They are snips that pack a punch.

Kai 7100 Scissor

There we go. That’s the scissor tour (and PSA). If you have any questions, leave a comment or shoot me an email. Kai stands by all of their scissors, and you can send them back to Kai for sharpening at a reasonable price. Personally, I’m over buying disposable goods and into investing in things that I can use for a long time.

Kai Scissors

Also, all of the 7000 series Kai scissors ship free domestically and have discounted international shipping rates.

Kai 7000 series scissors

Happy cutting!

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