Tag Archives | bag

Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

For the Harriot release, I tried out a couple of new bag patterns. First up is the String Bag pattern by Green Pepper Patterns–a pattern company that I’ve mostly seen at Joann. They have a huge variety of designs, and I was curious to give one a try.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

On the String Bag pattern, I made the Small size, which is actually a pretty handy size. I didn’t want one that was too big or too small, maybe one that could hold a pair of shoes for going to the gym. This is the perfect size for that, and I love that it is fully lined.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing that I really liked about this design was the front, zippered pocket. It gave me an opportunity to play with and feature the scallop.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

This gray version is the most subtle of the scallops, and I like the results, especially paired with the brown zipper and drawstring.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

I will admit that the instructions were a little hairy at times. If you’re new to making bags, there were a few parts that weren’t the clearest, and I do remember tweaking a few aspects to suit my taste. But in the end, I’m pleased with the outcome.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up are a couple of versions of another pattern that I wanted to try, the Finch Bucket Tote by Stitch Mischief. I’ve been doing a little bit of knitting lately, and this seemed like a worthwhile project to check out.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I made two versions, mostly because I couldn’t decide on just one!

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Both make use of a couple of the different yarn dyed wovens in the collection as well as some screenprints.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I always like a bag that has lots of fabric opportunities as well as extra details like the corded drawstring and webbing strap on this one.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

The inside of the bag has a nice, flat bottom, and the sides feature a wrap-around pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

On the other version, I used the scallop for the pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Even though the finished size for these bags is clearly listed, they still seemed to surprise me a bit by how big they are. They are a little too big if you’re knitting socks, but easily large enough for a sweater or any other big project you have in the works.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

There we go! A few new bags, and a couple of new patterns checked off my list.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

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Harriot Cargo Duffle.

I cannot take too much credit for this, but the Harriot Cargo Duffle is just adorable!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Rhiannon sewed this up, and she did a beautiful job working all kinds of cool tricks with the scallop print from Harriot.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

It’s such a fun detail that really spruces things up. I also like this bag makes use of the mixture of textures and patterns from the collection–grids, stripes, scallops, texture–bring it all on!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Robert Kaufman is planning to feature this project in an upcoming It’s Sew Friday, so stay tuned for that. I may need to follow along so I’ll have one for myself! It was hard having to give this one back.

The pattern is one of my favorite free ones from Anna Graham of Noodlehead. You can find it here on the Robert Kaufman website. I’ve made a couple of Cargo Duffles (here and here), and I think a new one might be in order.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

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Hi, Harriot.

Hi, Harriot. Here’s a look at my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has been a new experience in many ways. First and most obvious, there are yarn-dyed wovens in this collection! To say that this was a learning experience is definitely an understatement. Going from thinking about designs being printed on top of fabric versus ideas, colors and textures being woven together to create the fabric is pretty different. But it was fun, and the results can be something different to work into projects.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has some yarn-dyed wovens, but it also has a couple of screen-printed designs as well. I’m really happy that I was able to have the mix of both. I feel like it gives you a lot to work with in many different ways.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

In thinking about plaids and textures, I couldn’t help but also think of things you might find in a forgotten wardrobe, and not necessarily a gender-specific one. It was in this idea that Harriot became the muse for this collection.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I chose this spelling for Harriot in particular after reading about Thomas Harriot and how he’s credited with making the first drawing of the moon through a telescope. This collision of history, observation and drawing couldn’t have been a better fit.

One of the screen-printed designs in the collection features a bold scallop that had me thinking immediately about all of the different ways it could be used (including many moon-like ones). I’ll start with the more straightforward approach.

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

An enticing motif is always well used as a prominent feature on a project like in the String Bag (above, pattern by Green Pepper Patterns), or as in the See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case (both below and by Aneela Hoey in her book)

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

But it can also be used in ways with patchwork and quilting that play off of the shapes when cut and sewn in different ways–one of my favorite ways to play.

Harriot Circles Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My Circles Quilt was one of the first things that I wanted to make. I couldn’t wait to see the different ways that I could position the scallop print to be cut up. (PDF version of this pattern is coming soon!)

Similarly, you can see how peeks of the print mixed with plaids and other textures play with an appliquéd shape. Here’s new pattern Hunt–my newest appliqué project that I’m very glad to finally be able to share with you.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the appliquéd shapes are the same, but they’re made to look different based on where in a print they’re cut out. It was such a delight to figure out all of the cutting possibilities.

In contrast, here’s another version of my Hunt design with a very different (and easy) fabric approach.

Harriot Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt top (background, appliqué, border) and binding is made from just one fabric. That’s it. All along I’ve thought of the scallop design as a 3-for-1–colored stripe on one side, another colored stripe on the other, and a shapely motif that connects them. Use them separately, together or cut up and sewn together. Here I used all of one color stripe for the background and the other color for the appliqué. The border is cut to show off the scallop, which looks complicated but was really very easy.

My new pattern Hunt (and acrylic templates!) are coming soon. Stay tuned.

Also new, and a LONG time coming is this, meet Mini Eads.

Eads Mini Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Ever since releasing Eads, I wanted to do a secondary miniaturized option as well. It just works so well, and it can be a great place to make use of your scraps. More about this new pattern in another post, but for now you can see how the different pieces in the collection–including the scallop–can be cut up and pieced. The two-tone version on the right features a plaid from Harriot and Kona Grellow. I LOVE how Grellow fits into this collection.

One more thing to show you for now.

Harriot Tangelo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s in a new version of Tangelo. Tangelo is always a good way to combine different colors and textures, and so it felt fitting to use with Harriot. You can also see the scallop print at play (blue row 4th from left) and how it can provide some nice variety along with the other pieces. I couldn’t wait to see this one come together. This quilt was a group effort made by my friend Ellen Rushman, my mom Kathy Friedlander and myself. Go team!

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m thrilled to finally be able to share Harriot with you. There’s plenty more to share–including garments(!)–but I’ll stop here for now. I really hope you like the new line and that it can inspire you to do some sewing as it certainly has done for me.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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