Tag Archives | bag

Harriot Cargo Duffle.

I cannot take too much credit for this, but the Harriot Cargo Duffle is just adorable!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Rhiannon sewed this up, and she did a beautiful job working all kinds of cool tricks with the scallop print from Harriot.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

It’s such a fun detail that really spruces things up. I also like this bag makes use of the mixture of textures and patterns from the collection–grids, stripes, scallops, texture–bring it all on!

Harriot Cargo Duffle

Robert Kaufman is planning to feature this project in an upcoming It’s Sew Friday, so stay tuned for that. I may need to follow along so I’ll have one for myself! It was hard having to give this one back.

The pattern is one of my favorite free ones from Anna Graham of Noodlehead. You can find it here on the Robert Kaufman website. I’ve made a couple of Cargo Duffles (here and here), and I think a new one might be in order.

Harriot Cargo Duffle

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Hi, Harriot.

Hi, Harriot. Here’s a look at my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has been a new experience in many ways. First and most obvious, there are yarn-dyed wovens in this collection! To say that this was a learning experience is definitely an understatement. Going from thinking about designs being printed on top of fabric versus ideas, colors and textures being woven together to create the fabric is pretty different. But it was fun, and the results can be something different to work into projects.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has some yarn-dyed wovens, but it also has a couple of screen-printed designs as well. I’m really happy that I was able to have the mix of both. I feel like it gives you a lot to work with in many different ways.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

In thinking about plaids and textures, I couldn’t help but also think of things you might find in a forgotten wardrobe, and not necessarily a gender-specific one. It was in this idea that Harriot became the muse for this collection.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I chose this spelling for Harriot in particular after reading about Thomas Harriot and how he’s credited with making the first drawing of the moon through a telescope. This collision of history, observation and drawing couldn’t have been a better fit.

One of the screen-printed designs in the collection features a bold scallop that had me thinking immediately about all of the different ways it could be used (including many moon-like ones). I’ll start with the more straightforward approach.

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

An enticing motif is always well used as a prominent feature on a project like in the String Bag (above, pattern by Green Pepper Patterns), or as in the See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case (both below and by Aneela Hoey in her book)

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

But it can also be used in ways with patchwork and quilting that play off of the shapes when cut and sewn in different ways–one of my favorite ways to play.

Harriot Circles Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My Circles Quilt was one of the first things that I wanted to make. I couldn’t wait to see the different ways that I could position the scallop print to be cut up. (PDF version of this pattern is coming soon!)

Similarly, you can see how peeks of the print mixed with plaids and other textures play with an appliquéd shape. Here’s new pattern Hunt–my newest appliqué project that I’m very glad to finally be able to share with you.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the appliquéd shapes are the same, but they’re made to look different based on where in a print they’re cut out. It was such a delight to figure out all of the cutting possibilities.

In contrast, here’s another version of my Hunt design with a very different (and easy) fabric approach.

Harriot Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt top (background, appliqué, border) and binding is made from just one fabric. That’s it. All along I’ve thought of the scallop design as a 3-for-1–colored stripe on one side, another colored stripe on the other, and a shapely motif that connects them. Use them separately, together or cut up and sewn together. Here I used all of one color stripe for the background and the other color for the appliqué. The border is cut to show off the scallop, which looks complicated but was really very easy.

My new pattern Hunt (and acrylic templates!) are coming soon. Stay tuned.

Also new, and a LONG time coming is this, meet Mini Eads.

Eads Mini Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Ever since releasing Eads, I wanted to do a secondary miniaturized option as well. It just works so well, and it can be a great place to make use of your scraps. More about this new pattern in another post, but for now you can see how the different pieces in the collection–including the scallop–can be cut up and pieced. The two-tone version on the right features a plaid from Harriot and Kona Grellow. I LOVE how Grellow fits into this collection.

One more thing to show you for now.

Harriot Tangelo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s in a new version of Tangelo. Tangelo is always a good way to combine different colors and textures, and so it felt fitting to use with Harriot. You can also see the scallop print at play (blue row 4th from left) and how it can provide some nice variety along with the other pieces. I couldn’t wait to see this one come together. This quilt was a group effort made by my friend Ellen Rushman, my mom Kathy Friedlander and myself. Go team!

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m thrilled to finally be able to share Harriot with you. There’s plenty more to share–including garments(!)–but I’ll stop here for now. I really hope you like the new line and that it can inspire you to do some sewing as it certainly has done for me.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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Polk Pouches and Bags.

Bag making can be really fun and very practical. Here are some Polk pouches and bags that I made using the new fabric.

Polk Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Noodlehead makes some of my favorite bag and pouch patterns, and I’ve made several of them out of Polk.

First up are some pencil pouches, which are from a free tutorial of hers. These guys are great and not just for pencils. I’ve used mine for toiletries, hand sewing and several other things.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

What’s fun is that you can come up with different fabric combinations for the outside panels.

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Polk Pencil Pouches

Pattern: Pencil Pouch Tutorial by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Yarn Dyed in Aqua

Polk Pencil Pouches

Next up are some Petal Pouches (pattern by Noodlehead).

Polk Petal Pouches

There are 2 sizes included in the pattern–small and large. I’ve made both. I use the smaller size to hold ear buds, chargers and other travel essentials. The bigger one holds more, and I’ve even used mine as a clutch when attending an event.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

It’s such an attractive shape, and if you’re worried about sewing curves–don’t be! This one is pretty gentle.

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Polk Petal Pouches

Pattern: Petal Pouch by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk, Gleaned and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Petal Pouches

I finally made a Traverse bag (pattern also by Noodlehead).

Polk Traverse Bag

I love this bag so much, and it’s been on my to-sew list forever. Since making it (like immediately upon making it) I’ve been carrying it around daily, and it’s been perfect. The pattern includes 2 size options, and this is the smallest size.

Polk Traverse Bag

I love the small size because it means I’m not overloading myself and carrying more than what I need. I find that this size holds all of the essentials.

Polk Traverse Bag

Also handy, I used one of Anna’s hardware kits. It included the zippers, d-rings, slider, cording and little leather accents. I love that she has these available in her shop.

Polk Traverse Bag

Pattern: Traverse Bag by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Essex Classic Wovens, hardware kit from Noodlehead

Polk Traverse Bag

It’s worth mentioning that I also recently updated my wallet situation. I’m now using Noodlehead’s minimalist wallet (the smaller size), and it works perfectly with the Traverse. If you’ve ever wanted to make a wallet, this one is a fun and smart sew. I love how easily it comes together.

Polk Minimalist Wallet

Pattern: Minimalist Wallet by Noodlehead

Fabric(s): Polk and Liberty

Last up is not from Noodlehead, but instead from Grainline. It’s the Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set. Someone made me one of these, and I use it ALL the time. It’s such a perfect size for many things, but I’m often using it to tote around sewing supplies like my rotary cutter, scissors and other stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Plus, the flat, zippered pocket on the front (there’s a flap hiding the zipper) is perfect for holding your seam gauge and other flat stuff.

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

Pattern: Dopp kit from the Portside Travel Set by Grainline

Fabric(s): Polk, Architextures and Essex Classic Wovens

Polk Portside Dopp Kit

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