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New Sew Fine Thread Gloss Scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal.

New Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal.

Looking for a handwork refresh? I’m delighted to share new Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal! As with any of the scents that I’ve collaborated with Sew Fine to bring to you, I’ve personally spent a lot of time working with each of these new scents over the last several months. I find each to be delightful in their own way, and I hope that they strike a chord similarly with you too.

Let’s meet the new scents!

Sew Fine Thread Gloss in Yuzu

Yuzu

Yuzu is a slightly tart, slightly sweet, citrusy scent that is both fresh and light. It is easy to like and very uplifting. To me there’s nothing more refreshing than citrusy smells. This one has its own special twist that I think is just right.

Sew Fine Thread Gloss in Yuzu
Orange Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom is a scent very near and dear to my heart. I’ve spent a good majority of my life around orange trees, and the smell of the blossoms in the spring is like nothing else! It’s such a distinct scent, and this one captures it like few things do. Orange Blossom doesn’t really smell like oranges, to me it’s highly floral, only slightly citrusy and very fresh.

Orange Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss
Petal Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Petal

Petal is a floral scent that has the feel to me of getting dressed up. It is a lush blend of orchid and osmanthus with warm hints of bergamot, sandalwood and musk.

Petal Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Each of these new scents are available now in the shop. If you aren’t looking for something scented, you can always go the Natural route.

Want to know more about thread gloss?

I love using thread gloss, because it strengthens my threads and makes handwork an easier and more enjoyable experience. For the record, I never thought I’d like using scented gloss, but it turns out I totally love it. The scents are all light enough to not be overpowering or stay with you or your project too long, but they are present enough to bring a special, enjoyable comfort to the sewing experience. I’m a big fan.

I’ll link a few relevant posts below if you’d like to find out more.

+ Why I love collaborating with Sew Fine.

+ Thread Tips and Tricks

+ Needle-turn Appliqué tools

+ Thread Gloss in the shop

New Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal

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Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss.

I have some fun news–I’m very happy to announce a collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss!

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

To start, I never imagined how exciting thread conditioner could be. For the last several years, I’ve used Thread Heaven–a silicone based thread conditioner, which–for the record–is very nice. If you’re using Thread Heaven and you’re happy with it, that’s totally great.

But as many of you might know, the owners of Thread Heaven have retired, and they decided not to sell their special recipe. A pot of Thread Heaven is one of those supplies that I feel like takes decades to run out of, and so I wasn’t initially concerned about running out. But as an increasing number of students began to express panic over the situation and then ask me about alternatives, it seemed reasonable to keep my eyes open for other options.

It was somewhat serendipitous when Jenn of Sew Fine Thread Gloss reached out to me about her Thread Conditioner. In general I’m very hesitant to take samples of products that I haven’t tried before. There’s nothing worse than having to judge a product when there’s even a speck of obligation, and that was definitely not going to be the case here.

Harriot Hand Sewing . Carolyn Friedlander

With Jenn’s product, I was really curious to try it. She sent me a few of her scents, and at first, I wasn’t sure why I’d want my project to have a smell to it (which by the way, they don’t)…but, I’ve since changed my mind on that, which I’ll get back to in a minute.

To be very honest, the first time using it felt a little weird. After using a silicone-based conditioner for so long, the beeswax felt clunky and full of drag. It even made a different sound going through the fabric. (I know, I’m a total nerd and do too much handwork that I’m breaking down the sound of it.) Determined to give it a fair shake, I kept going and it quickly started to change my mind. I was doing this super-lame thing of alternating Thread Heaven and Sew Fine each time I changed thread, and before too long I realized that I was preferring the Sew Fine.

There’s a heartiness to it that seems to result in fewer knots than with the Thread Heaven. While I was starting to prefer that, I was also learning to adjust my preferences a bit. When using Thread Heaven, I would usually thread my needle first and then use a Quilter’s Knot before applying the conditioner. With Sew Fine, I switch it up. I wax my thread first, then thread my needle before making a knot by way of a Garment Knot instead. Of course, this is what I find to work well for me, but feel free to try different things to get the mix that works best for you!

Harriot Hand Sewing . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the scents, I quickly started to love them. Jenn formulates everything to a respectable strength that is gentle, fun and not overpowering. I’m pretty sensitive to smell, and so I appreciate her formulation.

Harriot Hand Sewing . Carolyn Friedlander

In addition to the smell being quite pleasant, I discovered that there was something motivating about changing the scent as you move along with your project. I’ve done a lot of handwork projects over the last 10 months, and it has totally amazed me how refreshing it can be to swap out the scent on a project as you go. Like when I was working on Hunt, appliquéing through the various colors kept it visually engaging, but the scent changes that I made along the way added a whole new sensory to the experience. Even now, I have a real debate with myself everytime I pull out some handwork, because I need to decide what scent mood I want to be in while working on the project.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

All of this is very nerdy, but if you’re like me, it’s these little details that make sewing such a captivating experience.

In addition to all of that, Sew Fine Thread Gloss is made with locally sourced beeswax that has NOT been chemically processed. It is handmade in small batches just outside Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The light amber color is attributed to this wax being very natural and only one step away from the hive, with absolutely no bleaching or other additives. The beeswax is filtered just once to separate it from the honey and from any leftover hive particles–which I just love.

Plus, the woman behind Sew Fine, Jenn McMillan cares deeply about her product and has been a total delight to work with.

On the collaboration! Together, Jenn and I came up with 3 new scents–each of which is a little different, but all of which are clean smelling and enjoyable to use.

First up is Sencha.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

To say that I’m a green tea fan is kind of an understatement. (I’m drinking green tea as I write this!) My strong love for it made scents related to it top of my mind.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

The Sencha blend has a green tea focus, but it also has hints (to me) of gardenia or even orange blossoms. (This is probably why I’m so drawn to it!) The result is super fresh and very verdant.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

I should add that it’s quite hard to describe a scent. After having friends and family smell many samples over the last few months, I know that we each seem to connect with smell in our own ways. It’s very interesting.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

The labels were also really fun. Jenn had the idea of throwing some of my fabric designs on there, which I just love. Plus, it was fun to think about which prints might go well with which scents.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is Citrus & Sage. It’s pretty dreamy and very bright smelling.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

I’d say that the citrus-ness comes forward first, but then there’s a very mild herbaceous-ness that grounds it a bit. This one might be the one that seems to have piqued the interests most of my friends and family who have been sniffing all of my samples.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

The third scent in our collaboration is Tea Flower, which I know…another tea-related scent, but I couldn’t help myself. It’s so good and quite different from Sencha.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

This guy is a crisp and complex blend featuring a fresh aroma of green tea with long-lasting sweet and citrusy middle notes. In comparing Tea Flower and Sencha, Tea Flower (to me) has more of a sweet, floral quality, whereas Sencha is more verdant and almost grassy.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

I’d say that all of the scents have a nice cleanness feel to them. Jenn does such a good job formulating the scents so they do not overpower. I find the level of scent to be just right.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

While all 3 of these new, collaborative scents are in the shop, I also thought it would be nice to offer up Jenn’s Natural gloss. I have grown to love using scented thread conditioner, but I also completely understand that that may not be the case for everyone or for every project. Natural has no additional fragrances added, and the familiar scent of beeswax and honey is delicate and modest.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

You can nab some of this in my shop too!

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Yay, yay!

It was so much fun working with Jenn on this project. It’s honestly my favorite conditioner to use, and I find that it makes such a big difference. My hope is that you will enjoy using it too.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Oh, and while putting together this post, I realized how much I like nerding out over thread. (Ok, maybe not new news…) And so I’ve created a follow-up post with some thread tips and tricks for you. Enjoy!

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

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Wildabon Market Tote.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes (/most of the time) I get stuck on an idea that I can’t wait to see through. This Wildabon Market Tote is one of them.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

Wildabon has been such a fun project in every way, and I’ve been eager to appliqué it on to just about everything. Here’s my Wildabon Market Tote, aka a mashup of Anna Graham’s Market Tote (from her book, Handmade Style) and the designs from my Wildabon pattern with Leah Duncan.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

With so many designs in the pattern, I like that you can pull one motif out and play with it on its own whether it’s in a bag like this or a pillow sham or anything smaller. Plus, if you’re feeling a little overwhelmed by appliqué or taking on something large, this is a great place to start. And, if you’re worrying about handwork and durability, don’t. I’ve been appliquéing on to bags for a while now, and I haven’t had any issues yet. Even if you are a new appliqué-er, quilting over your handwork–just like I did here–adds another layer insurance.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

This was my first time sewing with leather handles, and I have to say that I’m pretty into them after this adventure. I picked these up from Noodlehead’s shop, and they couldn’t have been any easier to work with. Plus, they are so pretty! I love how they kick the project up a notch. Installation wasn’t as scary as I imagined it could be. I used (my new) teflon foot, which made it super easy, as well as polyester thread as it was recommended in the pattern. Next time, I think I’ll be ready to give rivets a try.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s always fun mixing fabrics, and you’ll notice euclid on the outside (which is great, because of its heftiness) with lots of friedlander and friedlander lawn on the inside. I can’t tell you how much fun it is to appliqué with fabrics thick and thin, plus the options for mixing prints…yes, this is how I like to do it!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

It was fun getting that print situated on my inside pocket. I love a project where you can play around with your prints.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

When I was positioning the appliqué motif, I also thought about where I’d put the handle, how the side piece would be cut and how it’d wear. I like that the design spills from the top and spreads itself across the side.

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this bag can hold a lot! Here it is loaded up with my scrappy collection quilt, which–by the way–I’ve been hand quilting on and off, more off than on lately. But it’s coming together!

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

patterns : Wildabon from me and Market Tote from Handmade Style by Anna Graham

fabrics : Euclid, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

zipper : from Zipit

leather handles : from Noodlehead

Wildabon Market Tote . Carolyn Friedlander

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