Tag Archives | clothes

Mercer Tunic in Harriot.

Now that the weather is warming back up, I am very excited to make use of my new Mercer Tunic in Harriot. It is sooooo comfortable.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

The Mercer Tunic by Whitney Deal and I go back several years and many versions. It’s such a great top that I wear often!

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

This yellow yarn-dyed woven was crying out to me to be a Mercer from the very beginning. This fabric is really soft and has a nice drape. (PS, if you aren’t a newsletter subscriber, here’s a link to last week’s mailing that includes a bit more about the different fabric weights in Harriot.)

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I make this pattern mostly as-is, but I’ve shortened the length just a bit. In previous versions, I’ve explored different lengths but this one seems to be my favorite.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I always like picking a different fabric to use on the yoke lining as well as any bias tape facing for the neck and armholes. (Here’s how I generally do it.)  Using this method for the hem is also great, not only for the visual contrast, but also in any case where you’re ever tight on length. I wasn’t tight in the case of this top, but at other times when I might be pushing the boundaries of what I have, this hemming method is my go-to. Instead of multiple turns under, you only need the width of your seam allowance to attach the binding, before it all gets turned under.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

There we go, a new top!

Pattern: Mercer Tunic by Whitney Deal (and Moji Pants by Seamwork)

Fabric: Harriot (and Euclid for the pants)

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Harriot Wiksten Haoris.

Yes, plural. I made two Harriot Wiksten Haoris before Harriot was released into the world. I loved the first one I made so much, that I couldn’t NOT make a second. (And now I’m holding back urges to make more…at least for the time being anyway…)

Harriot Wiksten Haori

There are many good things to say about this pattern. First, it works so well with many different types of fabrics. I’ve seen it made up in silky, drapey stuff as well as heavier, sturdier linens–and it always works!

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

The meatier yarn dye in Harriot is very well suited for the Haori pattern. It has substance, texture and still a little bit of drape. Plus, I love the opportunity to play with the lining options.

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

Everything about the Haori is cozy. From the wide collar to the generous pockets…

https://shopwiksten.com/products/womens-kimono-jacket-sewing-pattern-1

And the shape is really nice.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I made this blue one first. It is the Mid length, and I love it.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

Next, I just had to try the Short length.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

This version is in the sage-y green from Harriot with a little more flash in the lining.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I have been wearing this one a lot. It’s a perfect layer for the Florida “winter” (if it cools off enough), and I wore it constantly last week when I was in Northern California.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I didn’t make any modifications to either version, although I did opt for matching the collar that you see to the Main fabric (rather than having the lining show). I’m sure this depends on your personal preference and the fabric that you’re using. I also didn’t interface the collar as mentioned in the pattern. The thicker fabric from Harriot had all of the substance that I wanted, and so I ended up saving myself that step and those extra supplies.

If you have a serger and like using it, this is a great project for it. I serged the whole thing, except in places where you need to do some top stitching. The serger made it a fun and clean way to put it all together.

Harriot Wiksten Haori

I am such a fan.

pattern: Wiksten Haori (Mid and Short Lengths)

fabric: Harriot

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Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

My Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup are some new favorites for sure.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

We’ll start with the bolero vest. The pattern is in Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara. It’s a Japanese sewing pattern book that has been translated into English.

Bolero Vest in Casual Sweet Clothes Book

I LOVE the trim detail on the version in the book, but after looking and not finding anything good I decided to take matters into my own hands. Sometimes not having the right option forces you to creatively discover a new one!

Insert the idea to appliqué some shapes from my Hunt pattern onto the back. I love how these shapes work together. This Bolero is such a good canvas.

After deciding on my color palette, the next decision was to figure out the shape placement. The great thing about appliqué is that you can move shapes around very easily to see what you like before making the final attachment. I cut out my shapes first and auditioned them in a few different spots before deciding on this one. I like the way they echo the neckline while breaking up the proportions in a nice way on the back. Plus, you’re able to get a good feel for the overall appliqué motif.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also fun about appliquéing a project like this is that there is less of it than you’d need on a full project. It can move along fairly quickly, while providing a nice impact. I did appliqué them by hand, but you could totally add them via the machine and/or something fusible.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

The vest isn’t lined, which made me pay closer attention to having clean-ish starts and stops, because I knew you’d be able to see them on the inside. Of course, if you didn’t want to concern yourself with this, it would be very easy to line this vest so you wouldn’t have to!

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I got a little fancy (and fussy) with my facings. I managed to get a bit of the scallop from the fabric in there, and I also spiced things up with some neon serger thread.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Tool Tip – remember this handy seam wheel set I mentioned in the Hunt Harriot post? The 3/8″ wheel made adding in the seam allowance to the Bolero pattern a complete breeze. While this book is translated into English, the pattern pieces do not include any seam allowances. You’ll want to add them in yourself.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the buttonup, I used the Grainline Archer with the Popover variation, which I LOVE. It’s such a great pattern.

The yarn dye that I chose from Harriot is super soft and the perfect weight for a buttonup. It is a dream to wear, and I love how versatile the color and pattern will be for mixing/matching/layering with other stuff in my closet. (Plus, I got a little fun with my yoke…)

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made this pattern many times and cannot recommend it enough. It’s a fun sew and an easy wear. I pretty much made it as the pattern is written, but decided at the last-minute to omit the top part of the collar. When I got to that step, I realized I’d not done that before, and so I left the stand as it is. I really like it!

Also, I had some fun with my buttons…

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

Making a buttonup can highlight your button stash–bountiful or lacking. In this case, I discovered that while I have been doing a good job of stockpiling buttonup options, my black department is lacking. I’ll keep that in mind in the future, but luckily I had these fun gingham buttons to use.

There we go!

patterns: Bolero Vest, Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara, Hunt Appliqué Pattern (appliqué on vest) by me, and Archer Buttonup with Popover Variation by Grainline.

template: Hunt quilt template (1/8″ seam allowance)

fabric(s): all from Harriot

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