Tag Archives | fabric

Meet my new CF Grid Group fabric!

I have some fun news that I can finally share. Meet my new CF Grid Group fabric collection!

CF Grid Group fabric collection . carolyn friedlander

On Grids

It shouldn’t be a surprise, but I LOVE grids. There’s something wonderful about clean lines and repetition, and grids epitomize that. Plus, once you get a good grid on some fabric, it’s really fun to cut it up and sew it into a project!

projects made using CF Grid Group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Grids can add a nice structure to piecing as well as some delightful contrast to curvy shapes and appliqué.

collection CF grid group fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

CF Grid Group Fabrics

This is my Grid Group, which is part of my basics line–Collection CF. What I’ve done is take some of my favorite grid-like motifs from past collections and reimagined them in a new way and with a specific color theme–in grayscale.

collection CF grid group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

On Grayscale and Color

When I’m teaching a color class, one of my favorite points to make is how you can exaggerate the variety and nuance in a fabric pull when you reduce your palette down to a very narrow range. Doing this has a magical way of emphasizing variation in a beautiful way. It makes it fun to see more color in whatever you are working with.

This is exactly what I was thinking when I put this collection together. Even though this is a grayscale palette, together these 12 pieces feel really colorful to me, and they come to life in projects.

collection CF grid group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Project Peek

And, I have some new projects, including a new appliqué project that I am just over-the-moon excited about. It’s called Bow, and it’s (maybe obviously) based on a Rainbow. I know I’ve dropped the ball a bit on my pattern releases recently, but I promise, this (and others I’ve been working on) will be real, and we’ll be able to sew together with them soon.

CF Bow quilt in CF Grid Group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

As for the new fabrics, you can ask your local quilt shop to get their order in now. The collection starts shipping in September.

Watch This

I put together a little video introducing you to the new group…along with more of a look at the projects on my YouTube channel here, and I’ll be sharing more about it all in posts to come.

Comments: 10 | Leave a comment


My Arlo quilt pattern.

Now that my Instead fabric collection is shipping to stores, I thought I’d take a little time to share more with you about my Arlo quilt pattern. This project was hard to keep under wraps at the time, because I was so delighted at each stage to see it come together.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I’d been wanting to play around with the classic hexagon for awhile, and this project is the result of that.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I always say this, but it’s so true–my favorite patterns are the ones where you can do a million things with them. Rather than having a design that only works in a few ways, I love it when a design lends itself to changes in fabric, color, block orientation, and/or the quilting. It’s always amazing and exciting to me when you can totally change up the look, although this gets me into trouble because I end up making multiple versions of many of my projects. I can’t help it!

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Arlo is definitely a design that can take on some different looks. In this first version, I used all of my newest Instead fabrics and the coordinating solids. The coordinating solids are a super-textured mix of Essex linen, yarn-dyed linen and even a metallic linen. I thought this rich mix of texture compliments the dark palette of the collection in a really good way.

Instead Fabric and Solid Coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

The pattern works well with fat quarters, which is what I used here. First, I organized my stack of fabrics in to a pleasing order. I knew I wanted some color organization to this project, and to start it off with some clarity would help me achieve those results. Then I cut the shapes from each of the fabrics and stacked them up. (PS, I discovered that this shoe bin from Target holds the cut shapes nicely!)

After everything was cut, I started sewing the shapes together by pulling from the stack. Again, I knew that working this way would help me achieve some of the color order that I wanted. I also knew that once I had my hexagons sewn together it would be easy at that stage to nail down the layout.

The layout was SO much fun! (Does anyone else look forward to laying out the blocks for the first time? I think it’s such a treat.) I used all of the different block options but oriented them to slant in a similar way across the quilt. I think that the repetition of the colors through different shapes plays in an interesting way across the quilt.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

After getting a layout that worked for me, I finished sewing the top together, and then I used big stitch hand quilting to finish it off. I like how the texture of the quilting threads and of the hand quilting give it a really nice feel.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I like seeing the colors of the threads pop, and I like the contrast in the fabrics. The printed pieces from the collection next to the textured linens keep it interesting. I always think about how the quilt will lay on your lap, and this one especially gives you many different things to notice and see each time you settle in with it.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This pattern can be sewn together in several ways depending on your preference. For this one, I chose to machine piece the top and then to hand quilt it. You could also hand piece the blocks OR English paper piece (EPP) them as well. Instructions for each option are outlined in the pattern, and there’s a printable EPP page so you can work from your preferred template papers.

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All templates for the blocks are included in the pattern, but I also have 2 acrylic template sets to offer as well. One set includes a 1/4″ seam allowance and the other set includes a 3/8″ seam allowance. Choose your preference based on what you’re most comfortable with. Since I was machine sewing mine, I used the 1/4″ seam allowance, but maybe you like hand piecing and you’re comfortable with 3/8″–you can use that too.

arlo quilt acrylic templates . carolyn friedlander

Each template is made from sturdy acrylic and features printed lines and drilled holes so you can cut and mark from them at the same time. (Stay tuned for another post that I have planned on how I like to use the templates.)

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it–my new Arlo Quilt pattern.

I’ve mentioned the possibility of doing an Arlo Quilt Along, but I’m curious–what do you think? I was hoping I’d be able to squeeze it in this August/September, but I’m going to have to push it back a little farther. Would you be game? What would you like to see during this quilt along? Leave any feedback in a comment below or in an email to me – info(at)carolynfriedlander(dot)com. I always appreciate hearing from you!

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Arlo Quilt Pattern

Acrylic Template(s): 1/4″ Seam Allowance Set, 3/8″ Seam Allowance Set

Fabrics: Instead and Instead coordinating solids (Note: I’ve been seeing many stores receiving these fabrics recently. If you’re looking for some options, I find google to be the easiest way to do that. Here’s a google search that I did. I hope that’s helpful!)

Arlo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 31 | Leave a comment


cf Hearts quilt pattern.

My new cf Hearts pattern is finally here!

cf hearts . carolyn friedlander

I love simple shapes, and the heart is lovely one to take on.

cf hearts . carolyn friedlander

While thinking about projects to make to show off my new (old) fabrics, I kept coming back to the idea of using this simple shape. There are many things I love about this fabric collection, but one of the biggest things is how it feels like I’m sewing with old friends. There’s a comfort and excitement with each piece, and I loved the idea of capturing the pieces with an endearing symbol.

cf hearts . carolyn friedlander

On the creative side, I liked how this project can showcase many colors and fabrics. You can play with color and texture in many ways. (I already have more hearts projects planned!)

On the technical side, the appliqué shapes are really fun to sew. You have gentle outside curves, a single point and an outside corner that make it anything but boring to work on. This shape is beginner-friendly, but the creative possibilities can make it exciting no matter who wants to make it.

cf hearts . carolyn friedlander

The downloadable PDF version is now available here, and the printed version will be hitting shops in a few weeks. (If your local shop is interested in purchasing copies, just let me know, and I’ll get them connected to those details.)

collection CF . carolyn friedlander

There are 3 project sizes included in the pattern, it’s charm-pack friendly (which is what this version is made from) and I have been dreaming up so many ways to work out this project. I think that 1 heart would make a great label on the back of a quilt, or I’ve been thinking about how fun it would be to make a signature quilt made from Hearts…or I’ve even thought about putting some hearts onto a tote bag…OH, and bigger projects with more hearts? I’ve been thinking about that too.

cf hearts . carolyn friedlander

Pattern: Hearts by me

Fabric(s): Collection CF (coming in November 2019) for appliqué, border and binding, Kona Seafoam for the background

Comments: 10 | Leave a comment


Hunt Quilt Along: A Closer Look At Fabric.

Hunt Quilt Along: A Closer Look At Fabric.

This week I want to take a closer look at fabric. I have some tips to share, and I also want to let you in on what I’m thinking about for my own project.

Obviously fabric is a big component of any quilt project. You not only have the color and print to figure out, but you also get to consider the type of fabric itself, whether it’s cotton, linen or anything else.

In general, I consider quilting cotton to be the most beginner-friendly fabric to work with. It’s very stable, and it’s not too thick and not too thin for quilting. (It’s called quilting cotton for a reason.)

gleaned coordinating solids . carolyn friedlander

Quilting cotton is also great, because it comes in many different colors, prints and solid choices. You can’t go wrong, and it’s definitely a fabric that I would highly recommend to anyone, and especially to anyone new to the game.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

Of course there are plenty of other types of fabrics as well. Some other popular quilting choices are made from linen and linen blends (like Robert Kaufman Essex, a stable linen/cotton blend that is a little meatier than regular quilting cotton and full of texture), and there are plenty of yarn dyed wovens (like Harriot Yarn Dyes, shot cottons, etc).

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Yarn Dye . Carolyn Friedlander

Something to consider when selecting fabrics outside of quilting cotton are the different properties of the fabric itself. You want to consider the stability of it–is it slippery or drapey, OR stiff and sturdy? Also, is it thick or thin? Does it have a tendancy to fray? Most anything can work, but depending on its qualities you might decide to make some adjustments.

Some adjustments might be to –

+ Cut your background to be larger so you can get a clean trim before sewing blocks together if your fabric tends to fray or if you know you tend to handle your blocks a bit more. I cut my background squares about an inch larger on my Hunt Harriot Quilt. It was a new fabric, and I wasn’t sure how it would behave. Giving myself extra ensured I could get a super-clean trim before sewing the blocks together. (Tip: In this case, I like marking the edges of where I’ll trim my actual block. I prefer to thread baste, but you can mark it anyway you prefer.)

Here’s a look at some thread basting in action. I’ve marked my seam allowance at the bottom. (In general, I prefer marking the seam allowance on these blocks this way. It’s totally a personal preference and not mandatory.)

hunt tester-3-carolyn friedlander-web

+ Adjust your basting stitch a smidge if your fabric is really thick or really thin. (Tip: With a thin fabric you may baste with slightly less of a seam allowance, and with thicker fabric you might baste with a smidge more of a seam allowance.)

+ Prewash your fabrics if you’re worried with them at all. It never hurts! Plus, I feel like a prewash can reduce some of the fraying.

+ Use your thicker fabrics as a background and thinner fabrics as your appliqué. A thicker fabric on the back gives you more stability. (Although I’ll admit that you can make exceptions if you’re really feeling a combination that goes against these rules. Just make sure your lighter background fabric maintains its shape as the heavier fabric is being manipulated on top. You don’t want this to distort your background.)

Now let’s talk a little bit about some design direction for your project. The beautiful thing about appliqué is how you can quickly get a sense of what your project will look like. Simply cut out the shape and lay it on your background! If you don’t like it, try something else.

Hunt Appliqué planning . carolyn friedlander

That’s exactly what I did when I was planning my Hunt Harriot Quilt. I started cutting out the shapes and laying them on the ground–although you could also start laying them on different background fabric options at this point too. This allowed me to figure out how I wanted the colors, fussy-cut scallops and other motifs to come together. Or you can work on a block-to-block basis. It was really fun to see the idea shape up!

Hunt Quilt Along Fabric Pull . Carolyn Friedlander

I am planning to make something during this quilt along. I selfishly chose this format, because I knew it would give me a great opportunity to make another version. I’d love to have a quilt for my bed, and after a lot of thinking about colors and fabrics to use, I think that I’ve decided to head in a green and white direction. There are SO many ways to take this project, and it is so easy to feel indecisive about it, but what’s helped decide things for me is thinking about 1) what type/size I want to end up with, and 2) where I want to put it. I think a green/white-ish version for my bedroom would be just the right thing.

I’ll use a mix of whites and creams for the backgrounds.

Hunt Quilt Along Fabric Pull . Carolyn Friedlander

And I’m thinking a mix of greens in some dark-ish shades like this could be nice. Although I’m not sure how scrappy/not scrappy I want each block to be. Looks like I’ll be doing some auditioning!

Hunt Quilt Along Fabric Pull . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s where I’m at, but I’d love to know where you’re at too. Feel free to comment below.

Resources:

+ Here’s a link to some of my favorite Thread Tips and Tricks.

+ I’ve set up a Hunt Quilt Along Board on Pinterest for inspiration. Head over here to check it out.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 3 | Leave a comment


My Instead Collection.

Finally, I can share with you something that I’ve been thinking about and working on for more than the past year.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m so happy to share with you my Instead collection.

Instead started as an alternative way of thinking for me.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

A fabric collection has many places where it can start. It can start with the design or a sense of shapes and patterns. It can also start with an overall concept of ideas to explore, OR in the case of Instead it all started with a sense of color that took hold and inspired me to take action.

Sometime before the Wainwright QAL last year, I became really interested in dark and moody color palettes. Light and bright is great, but I realized that I’d never really done a project where my range reached to the deep and dark ends of the spectrum. An obsession with the idea continued to grow after realizing my own need for the fabric to take me there.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Enter the dark seeds of this collection. I wanted to explore the depths of a rich, dark color palette, and I wanted to find a new mood.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Instead is a 15 piece collection on quilting cotton. It has been such a treat for me to be able to create designs for several different substrates (linen, yarn dyed, knit jersey, etc), but with Instead I’ve been excited to get back to the quilting cotton. I haven’t been able to stop thinking about patchwork! (That said, now that the release and a few quilts are behind me, I’ve been dreaming up a few garments and other things to make with this collection…)

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The collection is designed to work well with other things–especially all of my previous collections (I’m eager to start mixing it in!), but it’s also designed to work well on its own – like in the case of the new version of my Sunrise pattern.

Instead Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This has been one of my favorite patterns over time–it’s great for beginners, and it can take on so many different looks depending on the fabric. Like the collection, this version gives an alternative voice to the project.

The collection can also be mixed in different ways and with others, like in my new Arlo quilt. (I have been so excited about this project–more on Arlo soon!)

Arlo Instead Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Arlo was made from the entire Instead collection, plus a special set of coordinating solids that I put together.

Instead Fabric and Solid Coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

I always love putting together a set of coordinates, because it lets you think about how the collection can start speaking to other things. In this case, I liked the idea of adding loads of texture with a variety of linens. I don’t usually look to coordinates to repeat something that already exists, but instead I’m looking for ways to complement and expand the opportunities of all of it.

Instead Fabric and Solid Coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

So there we have it–my newest collection, Instead. I hope it can inspire you just as much as it has inspired me.

Instead Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 22 | Leave a comment


Mercer Tunic in Harriot.

Now that the weather is warming back up, I am very excited to make use of my new Mercer Tunic in Harriot. It is sooooo comfortable.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

The Mercer Tunic by Whitney Deal and I go back several years and many versions. It’s such a great top that I wear often!

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

This yellow yarn-dyed woven was crying out to me to be a Mercer from the very beginning. This fabric is really soft and has a nice drape. (PS, if you aren’t a newsletter subscriber, here’s a link to last week’s mailing that includes a bit more about the different fabric weights in Harriot.)

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I make this pattern mostly as-is, but I’ve shortened the length just a bit. In previous versions, I’ve explored different lengths but this one seems to be my favorite.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I always like picking a different fabric to use on the yoke lining as well as any bias tape facing for the neck and armholes. (Here’s how I generally do it.)  Using this method for the hem is also great, not only for the visual contrast, but also in any case where you’re ever tight on length. I wasn’t tight in the case of this top, but at other times when I might be pushing the boundaries of what I have, this hemming method is my go-to. Instead of multiple turns under, you only need the width of your seam allowance to attach the binding, before it all gets turned under.

Mercer Tunic in Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

There we go, a new top!

Pattern: Mercer Tunic by Whitney Deal (and Moji Pants by Seamwork)

Fabric: Harriot (and Euclid for the pants)

Comments: 0 | Leave a comment


Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

Harriot String Bag and Bucket Totes.

For the Harriot release, I tried out a couple of new bag patterns. First up is the String Bag pattern by Green Pepper Patterns–a pattern company that I’ve mostly seen at Joann. They have a huge variety of designs, and I was curious to give one a try.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

On the String Bag pattern, I made the Small size, which is actually a pretty handy size. I didn’t want one that was too big or too small, maybe one that could hold a pair of shoes for going to the gym. This is the perfect size for that, and I love that it is fully lined.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing that I really liked about this design was the front, zippered pocket. It gave me an opportunity to play with and feature the scallop.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

This gray version is the most subtle of the scallops, and I like the results, especially paired with the brown zipper and drawstring.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

I will admit that the instructions were a little hairy at times. If you’re new to making bags, there were a few parts that weren’t the clearest, and I do remember tweaking a few aspects to suit my taste. But in the end, I’m pleased with the outcome.

Harriot String Bag . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up are a couple of versions of another pattern that I wanted to try, the Finch Bucket Tote by Stitch Mischief. I’ve been doing a little bit of knitting lately, and this seemed like a worthwhile project to check out.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I made two versions, mostly because I couldn’t decide on just one!

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Both make use of a couple of the different yarn dyed wovens in the collection as well as some screenprints.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

I always like a bag that has lots of fabric opportunities as well as extra details like the corded drawstring and webbing strap on this one.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

The inside of the bag has a nice, flat bottom, and the sides feature a wrap-around pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

On the other version, I used the scallop for the pocket.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Even though the finished size for these bags is clearly listed, they still seemed to surprise me a bit by how big they are. They are a little too big if you’re knitting socks, but easily large enough for a sweater or any other big project you have in the works.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

There we go! A few new bags, and a couple of new patterns checked off my list.

Finch Bucket Bag in Harriot Fabric

Comments: 0 | Leave a comment


Harriot Pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers.

I’m a big fan of Aneela Hoey’s sewing patterns, and I loved getting a chance to make a couple of Harriot pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers: Pretty Cases, Boxes, Pouches, Pincushions & More–her book.

Harriot Pouches

First up is the See-It-All Pouch. I love this pouch. A friend made me one a while ago, and I always pull for it when packing (and storing) a hand-sewing project. It packs easily into my backpack and holds everything I need.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

The clear vinyl front gives you a great opportunity to show off your project and/or some fabric. In this case, I thought it’d be fun to show off the scallop.

Harriot Pouches

I used the meatier woven for the back, and the stripe for the binding. There’s something fun about bias-striped binding.

Harriot Pouches

It doesn’t take up much space, but I can still pack a block or two, thread, scissors, thread gloss and be ready to sew.

Harriot Pouches

Next up is the Two-In-One Case. This pouch is neat because it folds in half and snaps closed.

Harriot Pouches

When opened, there are two zippered, clear pouches. This makes it easy to see what you have, and it gives you another spot to show off some fabric or whatever you’re working on.

Harriot Pouches

I like the tidy size and have found it to hold just what you need as well. I’d really like to make some for my nephews and niece. I think they’d be great for storing colored pencils, crayons, and lots of their creative goodies too.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

Installing snaps has been hit or miss for me in the past, but lately I’ve been having good success with these plastic ones.

Harriot Pouches

Here are two new pouches in Harriot.

Patterns: See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case, both found in Stitched Sewing Organizers by Aneela Hoey.

Fabric: Harriot

Comments: 5 | Leave a comment


Hi, Harriot.

Hi, Harriot. Here’s a look at my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has been a new experience in many ways. First and most obvious, there are yarn-dyed wovens in this collection! To say that this was a learning experience is definitely an understatement. Going from thinking about designs being printed on top of fabric versus ideas, colors and textures being woven together to create the fabric is pretty different. But it was fun, and the results can be something different to work into projects.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has some yarn-dyed wovens, but it also has a couple of screen-printed designs as well. I’m really happy that I was able to have the mix of both. I feel like it gives you a lot to work with in many different ways.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

In thinking about plaids and textures, I couldn’t help but also think of things you might find in a forgotten wardrobe, and not necessarily a gender-specific one. It was in this idea that Harriot became the muse for this collection.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I chose this spelling for Harriot in particular after reading about Thomas Harriot and how he’s credited with making the first drawing of the moon through a telescope. This collision of history, observation and drawing couldn’t have been a better fit.

One of the screen-printed designs in the collection features a bold scallop that had me thinking immediately about all of the different ways it could be used (including many moon-like ones). I’ll start with the more straightforward approach.

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

An enticing motif is always well used as a prominent feature on a project like in the String Bag (above, pattern by Green Pepper Patterns), or as in the See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case (both below and by Aneela Hoey in her book)

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

But it can also be used in ways with patchwork and quilting that play off of the shapes when cut and sewn in different ways–one of my favorite ways to play.

Harriot Circles Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My Circles Quilt was one of the first things that I wanted to make. I couldn’t wait to see the different ways that I could position the scallop print to be cut up. (PDF version of this pattern is coming soon!)

Similarly, you can see how peeks of the print mixed with plaids and other textures play with an appliquéd shape. Here’s new pattern Hunt–my newest appliqué project that I’m very glad to finally be able to share with you.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the appliquéd shapes are the same, but they’re made to look different based on where in a print they’re cut out. It was such a delight to figure out all of the cutting possibilities.

In contrast, here’s another version of my Hunt design with a very different (and easy) fabric approach.

Harriot Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt top (background, appliqué, border) and binding is made from just one fabric. That’s it. All along I’ve thought of the scallop design as a 3-for-1–colored stripe on one side, another colored stripe on the other, and a shapely motif that connects them. Use them separately, together or cut up and sewn together. Here I used all of one color stripe for the background and the other color for the appliqué. The border is cut to show off the scallop, which looks complicated but was really very easy.

My new pattern Hunt (and acrylic templates!) are coming soon. Stay tuned.

Also new, and a LONG time coming is this, meet Mini Eads.

Eads Mini Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Ever since releasing Eads, I wanted to do a secondary miniaturized option as well. It just works so well, and it can be a great place to make use of your scraps. More about this new pattern in another post, but for now you can see how the different pieces in the collection–including the scallop–can be cut up and pieced. The two-tone version on the right features a plaid from Harriot and Kona Grellow. I LOVE how Grellow fits into this collection.

One more thing to show you for now.

Harriot Tangelo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s in a new version of Tangelo. Tangelo is always a good way to combine different colors and textures, and so it felt fitting to use with Harriot. You can also see the scallop print at play (blue row 4th from left) and how it can provide some nice variety along with the other pieces. I couldn’t wait to see this one come together. This quilt was a group effort made by my friend Ellen Rushman, my mom Kathy Friedlander and myself. Go team!

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m thrilled to finally be able to share Harriot with you. There’s plenty more to share–including garments(!)–but I’ll stop here for now. I really hope you like the new line and that it can inspire you to do some sewing as it certainly has done for me.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 46 | Leave a comment


Architextures Wide

Guess what? I have some new 108″-wide fabrics–Architextures Wide–coming out. In fact, Architextures Wide starts shipping to shops this month–yay!

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

Architextures Wide features the same text print from Architextures, which is transformed in the fabric width (now 108″ vs 44″) as well as in the scale of the design too. With this type of fabric mostly being used for quilt backs (although certainly not limited to only that), I thought it would be fun to blow it up a bit. Here’s a side by side with the original print on top and the new wideback below.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

It’s not that I don’t love a scrappy quilt back–I totally do–but I also love using 108″-wide fabrics to back my quilts. It makes things super easy when you’re eager to finish and also when you want something less fussy for the back.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

There are 5 different options in this new set–all of which are super useful and appropriate for a wide range of things. I’m excited about all of them, and many of these guys are making their way into my newest projects–especially the new blue option.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

There we have it. I hope you like using these! Architextures Wide is shipping to stores now, so you should be seeing them popping up soon.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

Comments: 7 | Leave a comment


Meet Babson.

Last up of the newbies is Babson, a very graphic and fun-to-sew project.

Babson Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is kind of like Eads in that it’s super mix and matchable, works with a bunch of different fabrics, can be made without a ton of planning and has a huge amount of possible outcomes. It’s about fabrics, shapes and colors playing together in all kinds of ways.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Unlike Eads (which works with fat quarters), Babson starts with 5″ squares. I find that when you have an easy increment to start with, it’s much easier to grab a pile of stuff you’re interested in (or just a few things) and get to sewing. What’s better than that?

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

On the pattern-design side, there’s also a big part of me that loves the challenge of figuring out possibilities for 5″-square packs. They can be so enticing, and I have many stacked around in the studio. This project can work well with them.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In this first version, maybe you’ll notice how my blocks are broken down into quadrants, each having its own coloring. One quadrant uses one 5″-square pack, plus 4 fat quarters. (Or you can also just use fat quarters for the whole thing.) I liked this formula because it makes it a much easier undertaking. Rather than feeling overwhelmed by a heap of blocks and fabric, you can work on it in sections, as well as flavor each section a little bit differently.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I used the same 5″-square pack of Polk for each quadrant, but in each group I added 4 different coordinates, so they each look a little bit different. Here’s what I added.

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom left – Kona Roasted Pecan, Essex Yarn (Dyed Berry), Architextures (Sorbet, Orangeade)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top left – Architextures (Desert Green), Kona Parchment, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Essex Yarn Dyed (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top right – Kona Paris Blue, Architextures (Acid Lime), Essex Yarn Dyed (Pickle), Essex Classic Wovens (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom right – Kona Sea Glass, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Architextures (White), Essex Homespun (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

In the end, I like the cohesion of the whole thing, and then I also like noticing the differences of the sections once you start looking closer. It was entertaining to sew, because each section presented new colors and possibilities.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The next version started with this Melon Kona charm pack. I’m not normally a pink person, but the mix of oranges and peaches pack a nice punch, and I was totally enamored.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Instead of making the larger throw size as before, I wanted to make a wall hanging, which is basically just a 1/4 of what’s required for the throw. After much debate, my additions to the Melon charm pack for this version were 2 pieces from Polk (AFR-17841-380, AFR-17841-14), plus Kona Orangeade and Kona Lingerie.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

These additions add brightness, texture and little bit of print.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

The blocks in this design are super versatile, and I tried to push them in a different direction than in the first version. Here I gathered all of the same-direction shapes at the top, and the other-direction shapes at the bottom. As much as possible, I used the orangey-brights to create the L’s, but then shifted it a bit as you get to the bottom.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now that I’ve made two, I still have ideas for a few more. Plus, I have some other charm packs lying around that I think will be fun.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s Babson! I can’t wait to see what you make. You can ask about it at your local quilt store, or you can also find the digital version available here.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Comments: 3 | Leave a comment


Meet Davie.

Meet Davie, my newest house pattern.

Davie Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

See the resemblance?

I don’t know why I love this house so much, but I do. It’s just so cute. Plus, when we’re talking about house quilts, they are such a favorite, and this one makes a good one. With Davie, I love this size block in particular. It’s big enough to have fun with fabric, but small enough to where you get to make several of them.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The design works with fat quarter cuts (18″ x 22″), and so fabric selection couldn’t be easier. I started with each of the (8) pieces from my Polk collection, and then added these 4 guys into the mix.

Davie Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

I liked how the crispness of the white, the warmth of the peach, and the brightness of the blues rounded out the colors with the other pieces.

Davie Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

I worked the colors in a specific order so that you get this neat stacking of shapes. The house in one block becomes the background in the block below it, making the whole thing really fun to look at. Of course, you totally don’t have to do that. You can mix up the fabrics however you please (just see the next version below)!

Polk Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

But then I wanted to make another sample. These houses are a little addictive…

Davie Fabric Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

For the next one, I was drawn toward pinks and peaches–in prints, checks and solids.

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

For this one, I worked with the other size included in the pattern which uses 6 fat quarters, and will give you a smaller wall hanging–or 2 mini quilts. The nerd in me loves the idea of 2 minis, because you can keep one for yourself and give the other one away. Or, better yet, you and a friend can each make a pair and then trade 1 of each. Wouldn’t that be fun?

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

With this set, I totally mixed up all of my pairings. While the first version had a specific rhythm to how the fabrics rotated their positions, in this one, I tried to mix it up as much as possible. (First is far left, pair is far right.)

Mini Quilts . Carolyn Friedlander

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

After Quilt Market, I taught Davie at Superbuzzy in Ventura, CA. Here’s a look at some of the class blocks. Great, right? Gives you some ideas on where else to take it…

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Davie has been shipping to stores now, so make sure to ask for it, or you can also find the digital version available in my shop here.

First version fabric(s): Polk, plus Architextures (AFR-13503-239), Gleaned (AFR-17292-1), Kona Waterfall, Kona Paris Blue

Pink/peach version fabric(s): Polk (AFR-17841-380, AFR-17842-391), Carolina Gingham (P-16368-107), Kona Orangeade, Kona Cantaloupe, Essex Classic Wovens (SRK-17585-63)

Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

 

Comments: 3 | Leave a comment


Site by Spunmonkey.