Tag Archives | fabric

Hi, Harriot.

Hi, Harriot. Here’s a look at my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has been a new experience in many ways. First and most obvious, there are yarn-dyed wovens in this collection! To say that this was a learning experience is definitely an understatement. Going from thinking about designs being printed on top of fabric versus ideas, colors and textures being woven together to create the fabric is pretty different. But it was fun, and the results can be something different to work into projects.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has some yarn-dyed wovens, but it also has a couple of screen-printed designs as well. I’m really happy that I was able to have the mix of both. I feel like it gives you a lot to work with in many different ways.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

In thinking about plaids and textures, I couldn’t help but also think of things you might find in a forgotten wardrobe, and not necessarily a gender-specific one. It was in this idea that Harriot became the muse for this collection.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I chose this spelling for Harriot in particular after reading about Thomas Harriot and how he’s credited with making the first drawing of the moon through a telescope. This collision of history, observation and drawing couldn’t have been a better fit.

One of the screen-printed designs in the collection features a bold scallop that had me thinking immediately about all of the different ways it could be used (including many moon-like ones). I’ll start with the more straightforward approach.

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

An enticing motif is always well used as a prominent feature on a project like in the String Bag (above, pattern by Green Pepper Patterns), or as in the See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case (both below and by Aneela Hoey in her book)

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

But it can also be used in ways with patchwork and quilting that play off of the shapes when cut and sewn in different ways–one of my favorite ways to play.

Harriot Circles Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My Circles Quilt was one of the first things that I wanted to make. I couldn’t wait to see the different ways that I could position the scallop print to be cut up. (PDF version of this pattern is coming soon!)

Similarly, you can see how peeks of the print mixed with plaids and other textures play with an appliquéd shape. Here’s new pattern Hunt–my newest appliqué project that I’m very glad to finally be able to share with you.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the appliquéd shapes are the same, but they’re made to look different based on where in a print they’re cut out. It was such a delight to figure out all of the cutting possibilities.

In contrast, here’s another version of my Hunt design with a very different (and easy) fabric approach.

Harriot Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt top (background, appliqué, border) and binding is made from just one fabric. That’s it. All along I’ve thought of the scallop design as a 3-for-1–colored stripe on one side, another colored stripe on the other, and a shapely motif that connects them. Use them separately, together or cut up and sewn together. Here I used all of one color stripe for the background and the other color for the appliqué. The border is cut to show off the scallop, which looks complicated but was really very easy.

My new pattern Hunt (and acrylic templates!) are coming soon. Stay tuned.

Also new, and a LONG time coming is this, meet Mini Eads.

Eads Mini Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Ever since releasing Eads, I wanted to do a secondary miniaturized option as well. It just works so well, and it can be a great place to make use of your scraps. More about this new pattern in another post, but for now you can see how the different pieces in the collection–including the scallop–can be cut up and pieced. The two-tone version on the right features a plaid from Harriot and Kona Grellow. I LOVE how Grellow fits into this collection.

One more thing to show you for now.

Harriot Tangelo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s in a new version of Tangelo. Tangelo is always a good way to combine different colors and textures, and so it felt fitting to use with Harriot. You can also see the scallop print at play (blue row 4th from left) and how it can provide some nice variety along with the other pieces. I couldn’t wait to see this one come together. This quilt was a group effort made by my friend Ellen Rushman, my mom Kathy Friedlander and myself. Go team!

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m thrilled to finally be able to share Harriot with you. There’s plenty more to share–including garments(!)–but I’ll stop here for now. I really hope you like the new line and that it can inspire you to do some sewing as it certainly has done for me.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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Architextures Wide

Guess what? I have some new 108″-wide fabrics–Architextures Wide–coming out. In fact, Architextures Wide starts shipping to shops this month–yay!

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

Architextures Wide features the same text print from Architextures, which is transformed in the fabric width (now 108″ vs 44″) as well as in the scale of the design too. With this type of fabric mostly being used for quilt backs (although certainly not limited to only that), I thought it would be fun to blow it up a bit. Here’s a side by side with the original print on top and the new wideback below.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

It’s not that I don’t love a scrappy quilt back–I totally do–but I also love using 108″-wide fabrics to back my quilts. It makes things super easy when you’re eager to finish and also when you want something less fussy for the back.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

There are 5 different options in this new set–all of which are super useful and appropriate for a wide range of things. I’m excited about all of them, and many of these guys are making their way into my newest projects–especially the new blue option.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

There we have it. I hope you like using these! Architextures Wide is shipping to stores now, so you should be seeing them popping up soon.

architextures wide . carolyn friedlander

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Meet Babson.

Last up of the newbies is Babson, a very graphic and fun-to-sew project.

Babson Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is kind of like Eads in that it’s super mix and matchable, works with a bunch of different fabrics, can be made without a ton of planning and has a huge amount of possible outcomes. It’s about fabrics, shapes and colors playing together in all kinds of ways.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Unlike Eads (which works with fat quarters), Babson starts with 5″ squares. I find that when you have an easy increment to start with, it’s much easier to grab a pile of stuff you’re interested in (or just a few things) and get to sewing. What’s better than that?

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

On the pattern-design side, there’s also a big part of me that loves the challenge of figuring out possibilities for 5″-square packs. They can be so enticing, and I have many stacked around in the studio. This project can work well with them.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In this first version, maybe you’ll notice how my blocks are broken down into quadrants, each having its own coloring. One quadrant uses one 5″-square pack, plus 4 fat quarters. (Or you can also just use fat quarters for the whole thing.) I liked this formula because it makes it a much easier undertaking. Rather than feeling overwhelmed by a heap of blocks and fabric, you can work on it in sections, as well as flavor each section a little bit differently.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I used the same 5″-square pack of Polk for each quadrant, but in each group I added 4 different coordinates, so they each look a little bit different. Here’s what I added.

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom left – Kona Roasted Pecan, Essex Yarn (Dyed Berry), Architextures (Sorbet, Orangeade)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top left – Architextures (Desert Green), Kona Parchment, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Essex Yarn Dyed (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top right – Kona Paris Blue, Architextures (Acid Lime), Essex Yarn Dyed (Pickle), Essex Classic Wovens (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom right – Kona Sea Glass, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Architextures (White), Essex Homespun (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

In the end, I like the cohesion of the whole thing, and then I also like noticing the differences of the sections once you start looking closer. It was entertaining to sew, because each section presented new colors and possibilities.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The next version started with this Melon Kona charm pack. I’m not normally a pink person, but the mix of oranges and peaches pack a nice punch, and I was totally enamored.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Instead of making the larger throw size as before, I wanted to make a wall hanging, which is basically just a 1/4 of what’s required for the throw. After much debate, my additions to the Melon charm pack for this version were 2 pieces from Polk (AFR-17841-380, AFR-17841-14), plus Kona Orangeade and Kona Lingerie.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

These additions add brightness, texture and little bit of print.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

The blocks in this design are super versatile, and I tried to push them in a different direction than in the first version. Here I gathered all of the same-direction shapes at the top, and the other-direction shapes at the bottom. As much as possible, I used the orangey-brights to create the L’s, but then shifted it a bit as you get to the bottom.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now that I’ve made two, I still have ideas for a few more. Plus, I have some other charm packs lying around that I think will be fun.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s Babson! I can’t wait to see what you make. You can ask about it at your local quilt store, or you can also find the digital version available here.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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