Tag Archives | gift sewing

Gleaned Pillow Shams using Rin and Alturas patterns.

I love making pillow shams. They are less of a commitment than a full quilt, and yet they can make just as much of an impact. Here’s a look at some Gleaned pillow shams using my Rin and Alturas patterns.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Towards the tail end of losing power after Hurricane Irma in September, I had a hankering for some Rin appliqué. You’d think that I would have been hand appliquéing it up without power, but the truth is that so many other things were on my mind (mainly my lack of a roof) that I really didn’t have the mindspace or time for it. Sadly. This is why it was nice when I started thinking about appliqué again towards the end of that first week.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

I made a pair of these guys, because I really like how a pair can show off how the variety of shapes can play together. And, a pair is also good for expanding on your fabric combos.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s something about exploring a fabric theme across two shams that’s really fun. You have more room and opportunity than just doing one sham, but not too many opportunities like when picking out an entire quilt where it’s easy to get overwhelmed in the picking process.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

With this set, I had this lime-y, pale purple-y, olive group in mind with a fun mix of textures between the prints and the fabrics themselves. All of the printed fabrics are my new stuff coming out, and then there’s a bit of Essex linen in there too. The main print from gleaned that I wanted to use has a special edge design, which is always fun to play with in appliqué. There’s some of that happening here.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also more happening on the back with the backing panels.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Finding fun finding places to use these special edges is always enticing to me, but of course, you can definitely use the fabric normally as well.

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Cording on a pillow sham is a great place to kick it up a notch. In this case, I like how it also ties the two shams together by using the same fabric.

Gleaned Cording . Carolyn Friedlander

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

My Alturas pattern was another motif that had been on my mind.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Again, I liked the idea of making a pillow sham, because it would be a great size to play with and the end results could be used to spruce up anything.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I used the same print as with the Rin shams for the appliqué but in another colorway.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

With the Alturas design especially, I like using fabrics that change and offer new ways for seeing the appliqué motif itself. Even though all of the shapes are the same, the way the fabric can be used makes them look a little bit different.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Oh, and BTW, with the size and shape of Alturas, I’ve long searched for the right size scissor. It’s a small-ish shape that is cut multiple layers at once, so sometimes a big scissor can feel a bit too big. As soon as Kai released smaller sizes in their 7000 series, I knew one of them would be perfect for cutting this shape. This is the reason that I decided to offer this size and this one in my shop. Either are great, and I’m constantly on the fence about which size I like better.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

For the backing panels, I went with a gray theme using two prints from Gleaned.

Alturas Pillow Sham in Gleaned Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

There we go. So many new pillow shams!

Gleaned Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Patterns : Rin, Alturas

Fabrics : Gleaned, Essex Yarn Dye in Olive (Robert Kaufman)

Some Tips:

+ I’m recently a big fan of the Ikea FJADRAR cushion insert.

+ Use a stiletto when sewing cording–it’ll save your fingers from danger! (Ask me how I know…)

Gleaned Rin Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

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Ebb sham in Friedlander fabrics.

While compiling my newsletter last week, I realized that I never shared this Ebb sham in Friedlander fabrics that I made awhile back.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

I love making pillow shams for so many reasons. They make great gifts, they are the perfectly sized project for trying something new (i.e. new combo of fabrics, new technique, etc.) and they are a great way to spruce up some part of your house.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

With this guy, I wanted to play around with some of the pieces in my friedlander collection, along with some euclid for the background.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Linen makes an excellent background because it’s sturdy.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Sometimes I quilt pillow shams, and other times I don’t. I think it can work either way. But I do like to kick things up a notch by adding piping. Here I used a piece from friedlander lawn. Lawn is really great to use as cording and trim. Its fine-ness makes it super easy to maneuver around corners and edges without adding much bulk.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

The back panels were also a great place to make use of this larger print in the collection.

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

If you haven’t made a pillow sham before, give it a try. They are such a satisfying and fun project to make.

+ pattern: Ebb (sham size is included in the instructions)

+ fabrics: Friedlander, Friedlander Lawn and Euclid

ebb sham in friedlander fabrics . carolyn friedlander

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Eads Quilt Along #3: Other Project Sizes and Ideas.

Eads Quilt Along #3: Other Project Sizes and Ideas.

Project sizes seems pretty obvious, but hang with me for just a minute while I explain why I think this is a worthwhile talking point for the week. When I was thinking about my own Eads project for this quilt along, I immediately started thinking about end goals for the quilt. Do you do that?

Obviously, a quilt to cozy up with for myself would be awesome. I know that I’ve already made one, but in reality it’s not one that will be in my hands very often. Many of my quilts are traveling with me while I teach or traveling on their own to shops, which means I’m rarely able to truly claim them as my own. That is not a complaint, it’s just a reality. Option #1 would be to hang on to this guy, which is a good option.

But I also thought of another option, which would be to shoot for making roughly the same number of blocks, and instead of making 1 quilt with them, make a few smaller projects. Out of 120 blocks, you could make like 3 baby quilts and a wall hanging. There are some babies that I want to make quilts for…and there’s a wall hanging that I’d like to make for a friend…so in theory I could kill a few birds with just one stone.

There’s also the possibility that you’re really getting into the process of pulling and picking fabrics. Yeah, I’m in this boat too. For that reason, I appreciated Carissa (@treadletothemetal) making note of it. (This is such a fun pull!)

@treadletothemedal

In this case, you could definitely consider multiple outlets for all the beautiful blocks that you’ll make. Or, you can also just make a MASSIVE quilt. That’d be cool too.

Last, there’s the idea that the creative direction that your blocks are taking are leading you down a variety of different paths. While I’m all about finding ways to connect those paths, I’m also not opposed to letting them be their own thing. By rethinking final project size and intention, you can give yourself the freedom to continue exploring without feeling like you’re wasting energy or sending yourself toward a dead-end. Just remember that there are a variety of end points for you to pursue. I think that the better goal is to stay creatively engaged in your project. The details can be worked out later.

Here’s where I’m at this week.

There’s something satisfyingly linear about this project. It’s almost like a tag team of fabric, where starting with one initiates a path to explore.

Eads QAL 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m finding the lavender path to be an area of interest.

Eads QAL 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

To be redundant on a point from last week, wardrobe choices worked their way into this batch of blocks as well.

Kalle Shirt Dress in Arroyo fabric

There’s more Arroyo (from Erin Dollar) that I want to add, but first I need to save some for a dress that I also want to make. It got cut out first, which ensures enough for both projects.

What goes well with warm lavender? Well, mustard and peach, of course!

Eads QAL 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

The mustard is from my recent friedlander collection, and the peach is the shade originally in my architextures collection. Fabric is so much fun. I hope you’re thinking so too.

Eads QAL 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ Use the paper! Write notes to yourself about what goes where if you need a reminder.

+ Have you found yourself at a dead-end? While I have been working relatively linearly so far, I’m all for aborting ship if an idea starts to feel stale. Shake things up if you’re feeling that it’s time!

+ Pick the fabric for your next block before calling it a day. This will make it much easier to get in the groove when you have time to sew again.

How’s your week going?

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