Tag Archives | gleaned

Hunt QAL #6 Check In.

Hunt QAL #6 Check In.

We’re halfway there! I cannot believe it, and I’m happy (and surprised) with my progress and hope that you are making good progress too.

Hunt QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

My goals this month were fairly loose. I only finished appliquéing 1 block over the last month, and I have the appliqué on another one underway.

Hunt QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

To tally things up at this 6-month point, I have 9 blocks fully completed, 1 block being appliquéd, 3 fully basted blocks and several background panels cut out and ready to get set up. I need to figure out the appliqué fabrics for the final blocks, which I’m sure I’ll map out all together. It’s easier for me to work in that way, and I hope to do that before the next check in.

Hunt QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

I did have one strategic revelation this month. If you’ve taken a class from me, you know that I love thinking about strategic sewing. I tend to plan out how I baste and appliqué each block so that it’s an efficient use of thread, steps and time. If it makes sense, I start/stop in certain areas, I may leave basting thread to be continuous between nearby sections or I may make use of other tactics. They are small things that over the course of a project can make a difference. Of course whatever works if it gets you to the finish line, but this stuff is fun for me to think about while I’m working through a project.

With every Hunt I’ve made, I’ve appliquéd each piece separately. This is such an obvious approach, that it’s taken me this long to realize that there is an alternative. Working individually isn’t only logical, but it is definitely the way to go if there are a bunch of different colors and you need to change thread for each of them. I can’t think of another way to do it in that case. However, when all of the pieces are the same color, like I have here, it’s different. I realized that I could work multiple shapes continuously instead of stopping to cut and reset a new length of thread at each shape.

If you take a look at the block below, the shapes on the left are only appliquéd at the top. This is because I am working continuously along the tops, easily flowing from shape to shape. I am making my thread jumps from the back, which are not seen from the front. (Note: to do this knot at the back of each shape without cutting the thread, jump to the next shape, knot on the back to secure and pull the thread to the front. Don’t cut the thread, don’t reset.)

This makes for a more continuous flow and importantly, you can now use a full length of thread before stopping, recutting and resetting up. I discovered this on this block, because I needed to use a gray thread on the gray tops and the green thread at the bottom. It seemed silly to stop and start at each little top, and so I worked them continuously in this way. It seemed to go faster because I could use each strand of thread longer, and so I knew I wanted to try it for the other pieces. I think it helps, and I’m continuing to try it out. Let me know what you think, if you’re into the nerdy details!

Hunt QAL . carolyn friedlander

Aside from that revelation, it was fun to finish this block and to see the way the print works in this context.

Hunt QAL . carolyn friedlander

I’ve been storing my blocks in a flat stack on a dresser, but I do pull them out monthly to take a pic. It’s nice to see the finished stack getting larger.

Hunt QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve decided that over the next 3 months, I’d like to try to get all of my blocks finished, and I’ve updated my calendar to reflect that. This way I can spend the final 3 months assembling my quilt top, quilting and binding this project. That’s the plan anyway! It helps to verbalize it, right?

Hunt QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Hunt quilt

fabrics: (so many!) jetty, collection CF, instead, harriot, gleaned, euclid, friedlander lawn

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Hunt QAL Month #3 Check In.

Hunt QAL . Month 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

Hunt QAL Month #3 Check In–here we go!

Hunt QAL . Month 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m on track with my goals this month–yay! I’ve finished 1/4 of the overall blocks, and I also have a couple of others basted and ready to go for the next 1/4. This month I added prints from Gleaned and Instead, which I’m pretty happy about. In fact, I’m planning to add more from Instead in my next batch too. I was worried about it being too dark, but once I auditioned it, I liked where it was going.

Hunt QAL . Month 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

A big realization this month had to do with layout. I found my blocks in a way on the floor that gave me the idea to make alternating rows of waves. I’m pretty intrigued and will keep the option in mind moving forward. Kind of fun, huh?

Hunt QAL . Month 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

Other than that, I’ve enjoyed steadily working on these blocks. They’ve provided some calm (usually before bed) amidst other deadlines and things going on.

Good watchables this month: Somm (on Amazon Prime) about 4 men training for the Master Sommelier exam and Diagnosis (on Netflix) about crowdsourcing help for mysterious medical conditions.

I hope the month has treated you well!

Hunt QAL . Month 3 . Carolyn Friedlander

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Sunrise Pillow Shams

I made some Sunrise Pillow shams for some friends.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Something keeps me coming back to the mini blocks of this project. There are 2 different mini sizes included with the pattern, and I love making both of them. In this project, I used the smallest of them (or block C in the pattern).

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

One nice thing about mini blocks is that they are extremely scrap friendly. I like putting scraps to use–it feels efficient and also productive, like you’re cleaning too by getting rid of a pile. Plus it’s always magical when surprising fabric combinations find their way to each other, which I feel happens more often when you’re working from a pile of scraps.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

These shams were a gift for some friends that were getting married. I liked the symbolism of new beginnings with the block, and I liked incorporating many of my fabrics as well as little bits of Liberty fabrics since one of the recipients loves Liberty too. As for the color palette, I wanted something neutral but also with some life. When I make a gift for someone, I try to hone in on colors that the recipient loves, as well make something that is somewhat versatile. A neutral palette can be great for that.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

After piecing the blocks, I sewed them together and added a border to create the right size for the shams that I was going for. I believe these are on 18″ pillow forms.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Then I did some straight-line quilting, added some piping, and finished them with an envelope-style back for slipping the shams on and off.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Usually when I’m working on something scrappy, I’ll wait until all of my blocks are pieced before deciding on a border. Here a print from Polk was just what I wanted to finish them off, and a print from Friedlander worked well on the back.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it–a set of shams for some friends!

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric(s): Mostly mine from many collections and some Liberty of London too

Pattern: Sunrise Quilt (I used the bonus Mini block C.)

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