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Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot.

The Noodlehead Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray pattern was screaming out to me to get made up in Harriot, and I finally got around to doing it a little while back.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve been wanting to make some of these adorable baskets ever since Anna first made the batch in Euclid. It’s a beautiful shape with some serious fabric (and functional) possibilities.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I wouldn’t say that I was scared to make them, but I did underestimate how easy they are to make. Maybe it’s worrying about having the right notions and interfacing, but it always seemed like a little bit more of a chore than it actually ended up being. When I finally got around to doing it, I wondered what had taken me so long. (Which might be obvious in how I made 5 of them all in one go…)

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

There are many things I love about this project. First, it’s a very functional make. Who doesn’t have a need for some cute baskets? There are two sizes that can be handy for many different things. They can be useful for you or for someone else if you need to round up a gift.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Second, it’s such a perfect platform for showing off some fabric! Check out the Harriot Scallop in use in this one.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Third, and maybe why I was hesitant, is that this project does require you to incorporate rivets and handles of some type. Prior to these projects, I hadn’t done rivets, and I’ll admit I was a little scared. When I went to add them, I was extremely surprised by how easy they were to install. (I used Anna’s tutorial, which helped a lot. I also tested a rivet on a scrap first.)

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the straps, I could have planned a little better in this department, but it ended up working out well. I had enough leather and leather-like options for all of them, except for the Scallop basket above. I ended up sewing together some fabric handles, which did the trick! It’s nice to know that that works too.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The fact that I made 5 of them in an afternoon should say something about how easy (and addictive) they are, which I really like.

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Since making these, I’ve thrown all kinds of things into the baskets. They’re very handy!

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it. My Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot.

fabric: Harriot

pattern: Tiny Treasures Basket And Tray (free!) by Noodlehead

Tiny Treasures Basket and Tray in Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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Hunt Quilt Along: Technical and Travel Tips.

Hunt Quilt Along: Technical and Travel Tips.

To start, let’s talk about positioning your fabrics after you’ve cut them out. Because there are so many pieces, it’s easy to feel like there may not be enough room for all of them, but there is! What I like to do after getting all of my seam allowances marked and the placement guide in position in the corner, is to lay my appliqué pieces down one at a time alternating between opposite sides and working toward the center. I find this helps even things out a bit. You might need to do a little scooching once they’re all on there, but they will fit. You want them to start off nice and tight so you get those beautiful gaps between the shapes after you appliqué them. This tight, neighborly fit gets you there. Here is a look at mine all ready to go. (If you’re curious about the extra fabric around the block, see the tips in last week’s post.)

hunt quilt . carolyn friedlander

In terms of skill level and ease there are definitely some good things about this pattern. Hunt is all about straight lines and outside curves, so you won’t be needing to clip into your seam allowance in order to turn your edges under. The tightness of the curves can give you a bit of a challenge, but here are some tips for that –

+ My main tip for tackling the tightness of the outside curves is to play around with how you baste it (if you’re using the appliqué technique as described in the instructions). When I’m facing a tight, outside curve, I tend to narrow my basting stitch just a smidge so that it’s more of a scant 1/4″. Feel free to play around with this and get a feel for what works best for you and whatever fabric that you’re using. I find the slightly smaller amount makes it easier to evenly turn the edges under at this tighter spot.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

+ My other tip is to be patient as you turn the corners. Nothing needs to be done in any one step. Turn each bit under one little bit at a time, and you’ll get there. It’ll be great.

+ If you’d like to practice with a larger curve, my Trudy block on Creative Bug is a perfect first step for getting basic outside (and inside) curves down. Plus, it might be helpful to see and replay the steps.

Otherwise, the great thing about Hunt is that it is the same shape over and over, so you’ll be able to practice it again and again. Don’t worry if they’re not all perfect, I guarantee that no one will notice! The shapes and colors will be enticing no matter what the outcome.

Since I was traveling last week, I thought it’d be fun to share a couple of my favorite project bags for carrying Hunt. Here’s my current situation.

Clutched by May Chappell

The Clutched pouch by May Chappell is pretty handy (and pretty! Lee made this one up for me in some of that Harriot scallop). What I really like about this bag is that it opens out nicely and stays that way when you’re working, giving you good access to your goodies. Plus, it holds quite a bit! I’ve been surprised by what all I can fit in this one.

Clutched by May Chappell

Since I had a few other things with me on my trip last week, I also carried the Sew It All Pouch by Aneela Hoey. It’s in her book Stitched Sewing Organizers, (and I have a post about this pouch here). I love this bag for many reasons, but especially for how nicely it slides into my backpack when I’m on the go.

This was not planned, but it wasn’t until traveling with both of them that I realized how nicely they match. It makes me really happy.

Harriot Scallop Pouches

There we have it for the week. Next week I’ll be kicking off a giveaway, so stay tuned!

Resources:

+ Here’s a fun thread knot to try.

+ Just because I was looking at my YouTube channel, I thought it’d be a fun flashback to show you the time I layed out my Eads QAL quilt. Ha! If you’re getting hung up on fabric choices and how you’ll lay it out, don’t worry, you still have plenty of time to sort it out! Move forward in the direction that most excites you.

+ It’s time to get some playlists going to power you through some handwork, whether it’s Podcasts, TV shows or whatever summer activities you have lined up. I’ll be sharing some of my favorites next week, but I’d love to hear some of yours too! Here’s one thing I’m eyeing on Netflix about a Price is Right superfan. I LOVED watching the Price is Right as a kid, and something tells me this will be an enjoyable watch when I get to my handstitching.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

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Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Yay, I’m so glad that you’re joining in! And I’m really excited to hear that many of you are happy about the year-long format. It’ll be good!

This week I’m doing a bit of an overview, and I’m going to show you some different ways to think about the project. I always love a project that can be translated in different ways, and Hunt fits that calling perfectly.

You’ve already seen this version.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

It (more here) is a celebration of color and texture, and it also shows the idea that you don’t have to treat every piece the same. In addition to using many colors, prints and wovens for the appliqués (or cut shapes), I fussy cut different sections from the scallop print in Harriot to add interest and variety to the shapes. Here are some that I cut first, before auditioning in the project.

Hunt scallop cutting . carolyn friedlander

Although I used many different fabrics for the appliqués, I used the same fabric for the background. I feel like that makes the different colors really pop.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also this one that you’re familiar with.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In contrast to the previous example, this version only features 2 colors–and actually just one fabric (see here.) With a 2-color project, you can see how much of a visual impact you can make.

Another 2-color example is the vest I made using Hunt.

Hunt Appliquéd Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ve seen this before too, but it’s a good thing to bring up, because I want you to see that you don’t have to think about this design as only ending up as a quilt. These motifs can thrown on just about anything–clothing, bags, whatever!

As a little bonus, here’s a look at another idea I explored early on.

In addition to a 2-color direction, I also considered mixing it up and using different fabrics for the appliqués on the vest. There was also some play with the placement, but what a different look!

And now to some other things to think about that you may not have seen…

First up is a block using my newest fabric. It’s a block from when I was considering making a Hunt sample for the release. I ended up focusing on other things, but here it is. The new collection is all dark and moody, which I thought would set a neat tone. As far as the layout was concerned, I imagined using different 2-color fabric combinations within each block. This would give you another effect, and I’m still intrigued by the idea.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

On a side note, while basting this project I was reminded of how much I enjoy this part of the process. It’s repetitive, satisfying and very relaxing. At the end of a long day, this is the perfect thing.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

Another example in quilting cotton is this block that started as a demo piece for Quilt Market last fall and has stayed a class demo and sample. In terms of color and fabric, I’m sometimes drawn to combinations that are not always high in contrast and can speak to a theme. The blues in these fabrics are similar-ish in value, but the shades of them are pretty different. It almost clashes in a way that I really love.

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus the prints themselves (mostly from Harriot) play off of each other in a neat way. Lines and grids and texture are all coming together.

This one is a great example of how awesome it is to see the shapes separate and start to define themselves as they get turned under during appliqué. I love this reveal between the shapes in this pattern. I really want to see this one appliquéd!

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s another block made from quilting cotton. This one was my very first tester block when I was playing with the motif. It too doesn’t have a ton of contrast in terms of the fabric that I chose. It’s soft and subtle. One of the fussy-cuttable motifs from Friedlander was fun to cut up and use.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

As a general note, working with quilting cotton will be the easiest place to start with this project and with appliqué in general.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

Now for some other technical approaches!

Here is a raw-edge, fused and matchstick-quilted sample that I made to show off some other ways you could take this project in terms of technique.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the shapes were first fused to the background, then layered with batting and backing, and lastly quilted with lots of straight lines close together. This is a totally different approach, and it has a really nice effect.

In this case, you’d cut your shapes from the template without seam allowances, because it’s raw edge, and you’re not turning anything under.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

You can also mix techniques in the same project and even in the same block. Here I appliquéd some of the shapes normally (on the background panel), and then I sandwiched it together with batting and backing, and have started quilting in the motif.

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

I’d love to see something like this played out across multiple blocks together. I think it could look really great!

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

This panel is simply embroidered (with my favorite bright orange embroidery floss). (Although, not finished, yet…)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Simple idea, but it’s another great way to explore the motif. (You’d use the seam-free template here too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Wholecloth is also a possibility. Pick a plain fabric or one with something going on–either way, I think it could be a neat direction to go.

Wholecloth Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

(This would use the seam-free template too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it, a few ways to look at the project. And that’s just the start! I hope seeing these examples is helpful as you start to think about the direction you want to go.

I’ll leave things here for now, and I’m including some relevant resources below if you’re interested in a deeper dive.

Let me know what you think, and I’m really glad you’re following along!

Resources:

+ Some of you asked for recommendations on good places to start with appliqué. My Trudy block on Creative Bug is a fantastic place to get some practice if you’re looking to do that before starting in on your own Hunt. Not only is this a very manageable size, but the videos will walk you through all the same steps technical steps that you’ll be using to make Hunt as well. Like Hunt, my Trudy block gives you an opportunity to work on outside curves–in this case they’re nice and gentle–which is good practice before tackling the tighter, outside curves in Hunt. (If you’re wanting a more indepth look at appliqué, you can see this other project from me on Creative Bug as well.)

+ If you’re curious about supplies, read about my favorite appliqué tools in my blog post here.

+ If you still need a copy of the pattern or templates, you can find the pattern here and the templates here.

+ If you’re following along, I’d love to see your progress! Feel free to share using #huntQAL … And there might be some giveaways as we go along.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

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