Tag Archives | japanese sewing

Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

My Hunt Bolero Vest and Harriot Archer Buttonup are some new favorites for sure.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

We’ll start with the bolero vest. The pattern is in Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara. It’s a Japanese sewing pattern book that has been translated into English.

Bolero Vest in Casual Sweet Clothes Book

I LOVE the trim detail on the version in the book, but after looking and not finding anything good I decided to take matters into my own hands. Sometimes not having the right option forces you to creatively discover a new one!

Insert the idea to appliqué some shapes from my Hunt pattern onto the back. I love how these shapes work together. This Bolero is such a good canvas.

After deciding on my color palette, the next decision was to figure out the shape placement. The great thing about appliqué is that you can move shapes around very easily to see what you like before making the final attachment. I cut out my shapes first and auditioned them in a few different spots before deciding on this one. I like the way they echo the neckline while breaking up the proportions in a nice way on the back. Plus, you’re able to get a good feel for the overall appliqué motif.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also fun about appliquéing a project like this is that there is less of it than you’d need on a full project. It can move along fairly quickly, while providing a nice impact. I did appliqué them by hand, but you could totally add them via the machine and/or something fusible.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

The vest isn’t lined, which made me pay closer attention to having clean-ish starts and stops, because I knew you’d be able to see them on the inside. Of course, if you didn’t want to concern yourself with this, it would be very easy to line this vest so you wouldn’t have to!

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I got a little fancy (and fussy) with my facings. I managed to get a bit of the scallop from the fabric in there, and I also spiced things up with some neon serger thread.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Tool Tip – remember this handy seam wheel set I mentioned in the Hunt Harriot post? The 3/8″ wheel made adding in the seam allowance to the Bolero pattern a complete breeze. While this book is translated into English, the pattern pieces do not include any seam allowances. You’ll want to add them in yourself.

Hunt Bolero Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the buttonup, I used the Grainline Archer with the Popover variation, which I LOVE. It’s such a great pattern.

The yarn dye that I chose from Harriot is super soft and the perfect weight for a buttonup. It is a dream to wear, and I love how versatile the color and pattern will be for mixing/matching/layering with other stuff in my closet. (Plus, I got a little fun with my yoke…)

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve made this pattern many times and cannot recommend it enough. It’s a fun sew and an easy wear. I pretty much made it as the pattern is written, but decided at the last-minute to omit the top part of the collar. When I got to that step, I realized I’d not done that before, and so I left the stand as it is. I really like it!

Also, I had some fun with my buttons…

Harriot Archer Buttonup . Carolyn Friedlander

Making a buttonup can highlight your button stash–bountiful or lacking. In this case, I discovered that while I have been doing a good job of stockpiling buttonup options, my black department is lacking. I’ll keep that in mind in the future, but luckily I had these fun gingham buttons to use.

There we go!

patterns: Bolero Vest, Casual Sweet Clothes by Noriko Sasahara, Hunt Appliqué Pattern (appliqué on vest) by me, and Archer Buttonup with Popover Variation by Grainline.

template: Hunt quilt template (1/8″ seam allowance)

fabric(s): all from Harriot

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Sewing with Friedlander Lawn.

Friedlander Lawn Garments . Carolyn Friedlander

Sewing with Friedlander Lawn is an easy given. Lawn works really well for garments because of it’s fine-ness, softness and beautiful drape. Here are some things I’ve made (/been wearing constantly). Apologies in advance for throwing so many projects in to one post! I’m hoping it is handy to have many of the projects all in one place.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Because of its weight and wearability, lawn is perfectly suited for blouses and tops, and the Archer by Grainline is one of my favorites. It’s awesome in just about every way. The directions are well-written, the pieces are well-drafted, and there is a ton of support for making it in terms of sew-alongs, etc. If you’ve never made a button-up (or even a garment), this is the way to go, because you’re in good hands with Grainline–they have your back!

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

This is the popover variation, which does require a special pattern pack. The main difference between this one and the regular one is that the popover version doesn’t button all the way down. There’s also an alternate option for the sleeve plackets in this version too. I always like to learn new tricks and alternatives, which makes this route a fun one. If you’ve already made the regular Archer a few times, the popover version is a fun way to change things up.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

One thing to note about the pieces in the Friedlander Lawn group is that there are no color-palette repeats with the quilting cotton group. I’m not one for redundancy, and so if the same designs will be used on a different substrate, I see that as an opportunity to explore more color options. And I did.

Friedlander Lawn Archer Popover . Carolyn Friedlander

Like I said, button-ups and lawn go hand-in-hand, so this Archer hasn’t been (and won’t be) the only button-up so far. I also tried out a new pattern by Named, their Helmi Trench Blouse. (Take note that this pattern also features a dress option. I’m totally into that too and plan to make one soon!)

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

The detailing on this button-up is really interesting and what made me want to make it. There are front and back flaps reminiscent of a trench coat.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus there is a rounded collar that is very adorable.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

There is also a gathered sleeve cuff, although I decided against that and instead went with a regular buttoned cuff and placket. Actually, I used the placket and cuff pieces from the Archer Popover, but narrowed the cuff because it felt like a more appropriate proportion for this style blouse. The split hem is also a nice touch.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

I wasn’t sure how the fit would work out, but it’s perfect for me without many adjustments. This was surprising, because the standard Named fit is for someone quite a bit taller than I am. I’m about 5’4″ and the only adjustment I made was to shorten the sleeves just a bit, which had to be done anyway with the changes I made to the cuff. I made no changes to the overall length or width otherwise.

Friedlander Lawn Helmi . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is another button-up, yes, I’m really into lawn button-ups, it’s just too good of a fit for both the fabric and what I like wearing on a daily basis. This time it’s the Alder Shirtdress, another Grainline favorite.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

A sleeveless shirtdress is a personal favorite because of how versatile it is. I’ve already worn this as-is, layered with tights and a sweater, over jeans and with a cardigan. Sweet stuff.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

The only thing that I kick myself about is that I didn’t add side pockets. Note to self: on ALL future versions, there will be side pockets.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

This print in the collection reminds me of old shirtings, which is why I was quick to make a shirt with it.

Friedlander Lawn Alder Shirtdress . Carolyn Friedlander

When I audition buttons, I always try out these gingham ones first. A friend gave me a bag of them in assorted colors, and I love when they work so well with a project.

The Ruffle-Front Blouse (from Happy Homemade: Sew Chic by Yoshiko Tsukiori) is one I’ve made before and wear often. My previous version was made out of quilting cotton, which wears well, but I knew a lawn version could be even better.

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

By the way, this book is one of the Japanese sewing books that has been translated into English. If you’re wanting to dive into some Japanese sewing, a translated option is a great place to start.

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Ruffle-Front Blouse . Carolyn Friedlander

From another Japanese sewing book–Check & Stripe, title otherwise unknown because this one isn’t translated into English (heads up!)–is this lovely dress that I’d been eyeing ever since getting the book. (It’s the project featured on the cover.)

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

The detailing is so pretty between the rounded and split collar and then the pleated sleeve cuffs.

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, it does have pockets. Yay for that.

Friedlander Lawn Check and Stripe Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Have you heard of Peppermint Magazine? I hadn’t until seeing someone post a finished garment from their free pattern collection. It turns out that Peppermint is a really thoughtful and well-done magazine out of Australia that conveniently (and generously) releases a free garment pattern with each issue. Win win. I have several of the patterns on my to-make list, but here’s the Peplum Top from Issue 31.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s a little spot at the shoulder where you can slip in a bit of another print, which I did.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

Alteration-wise, I did reduce some of the ruffle by not cutting the strip as long as it suggests. If I remember correctly, I think I made it short enough to work with the width of fabric, because that seemed like enough for me and an efficient way to cut it. In future versions, I’d add a little more length to the bodice as this one hits me just a smidge higher than I like. Easy future fix.

Friedlander Lawn Peplum Top . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also Sointu Kimono Tee by Named. This pattern is intended for a knit, which I didn’t realize until I was about to make it. (Ha!) While a knit would be nice, I figured lawn would probably work pretty well too. I didn’t have to make any adjustments, because there was enough ease built-in to work with using a woven. (On a side note, if you’d like to read up on swapping out wovens for knits, Christine Haynes wrote a great article for Seamwork, here.)

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Because I was using a woven instead of a knit I cut the sleeves on the bias to give them a little more softness and movement.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

I think it also works without the belt.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Gotta love the versatility.

Friedlander Lawn Sointu top . Carolyn Friedlander

Ok, last up is a little tunic that I made for my niece. I have lots of kid stuff planned–including some button-ups for my nephews, but the Ryka tunic by Whitney Deal was too easy and cute to throw together. I need to get a picture of her in it!

Friedlander Lawn Ryka tunic . Carolyn Friedlander

Thanks for following along with me! I hope that you’re having fun with the lawn too!

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