Tag Archives | kona cotton

Kept Quilted Coat and Tote

The Kept Quilted Coat and Tote not only rhyme, but they are also super fun! Brittney Frey (who makes some really incredible quilted coats) made these using my Kept collection and the coordinates.

Kept Quilted Coat and Tote

Quilted Coat

Kept Quilted Coat

For the coat, Brittney used the Nova Coat from Papercut Patterns and the Fat Quarter bundles of both Kept and the coordinates. It’s such a great shape, and I LOVE that it has pockets.

Kept Quilted Coat

Brittney created a patchwork of color and print from the various fabrics. I love how they are grouped together and transition across the coat!

Kept Quilted Coat

The Tote

Kept Quilted Tote

For the tote, she used the Sylvie Tote (Everyday Size) by Sotak Handmade and the leftover fabrics from the coat. This bag is an excellent size for everyday carrying, for sure.

Kept Quilted Coat and Tote

Brittney patchworked the fabrics in the same way and at the same scale for the tote as she did for the tote. It makes a great pair, don’t you think?

The Details and Construction

Kept Quilted Coat pocket detailing

Not to put too fine a point on this, but this coat and tote are BEAUTIFULLY made. Brittney did such an incredible job. The lining on the coat is finished out with an invisible zipper enclosing all of the layers, the patchwork matches up perfectly in the pocket construction, there’s a label(!), and the tote is finely detailed too with a zippered section, rivets and leather handles. As soon as I received the shipment from Brittney I so enjoyed taking in all of these thoughtful and skilled decisions.

Kept Quilted Coat and Tote

Patterns: Nova Coat by Papercut Patterns and Sylvie Tote (Everyday Size) by Sotak Handmade

Fabrics: Kept and Kept Coordinates – FQ bundles

Kept Quilted Coat

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Aerial Update And A New Version In My CF Grid Group Fabrics

I’ve been wanting to make a new Aerial quilt for quite some time. It was one of my early patterns, and one I’ve been eager to get back to. Here is my Aerial update.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander
photo by Alexis Wharem

The Design

The design is inspired by an imaginary view from above. It’s a fairly simple idea with loads of horizontal sections divided by diagonal slices and blocks of differing sizes.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

Technique and Fabric

The project is made using foundation paper piecing, which makes everything super easy and clean. You can work from 2 1/2″ strips. Bring on the scraps, yardage or whatever you have! I worked from the roll up of my newest CF Grid Group and a special Kona Cotton roll up that I put together to coordinate with it. To me this is a great example of how grayscale doesn’t necessarily mean lacking in color. Don’t you think?

CF Grid Group and Kona cotton fabrics for Aerial Update quilt . carolyn friedlander

Working With Other Substrates

Aerial works really well with solids and textural prints. It’s also great for working in other substrates, which was a big focus for me in my first version. Sewing onto the paper foundation stabilizes a variety of fabrics, making it easy by limiting stretch, drape or any other imbalance between the fabrics you are using. If you are new to foundation paper piecing and/or working with a variety of substrates, this is a great way to go.

Tip: Pre-wash and dry all fabrics when doing this to equalize any differences that might occur when laundering in the future.

The Aerial Update

I’ve updated the pattern to include the new sample. I made some tweaks to the blocks, and I changed out some of the project sizes so that the pattern includes four different size options; Throw, Runner, Wall and Baby. The pattern has six different blocks and coloring pages to map out your own version.

aerial quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Planning

In planning this project, I don’t tend to make an overall plan, instead I start with the fabrics and then I think about groupings of three fabrics for each block. I find that this helps break down many choices into something more manageable. Plus, it gives cohesion to each block and the quilt as a whole, while also making the sewing experience entertaining as I tried coming up with new three-fabric combinations for each block.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

There’s an optional “Block Yardage” listing in the fabric requirements that you can use to add cohesion or to provide extra wiggle room if you are new to paper piecing.

Project Details

Pattern: Aerial Quilt Pattern

Fabric(s): CF Grid Group and Kona Coordinates

Bonus: Aerial was also a design I used in my couch! Here’s part 1 and part 2.

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Clay Kept Quilt

With my Kept fabrics now hitting stores, I’m excited to share more about my Clay Kept quilt.

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Deciding on a Technique

I’ve made a couple of Clay quilts already–the throw-sized version that is on the pattern cover, and the mini wall hanging that is the project that started it all. I made both quilts using needle-turn appliqué by hand, one of my favorite techniques. It’s relaxing and you get to feel and enjoy each fabric and color as you go, which can be magical.

clay quilt mini . carolyn friedlander

With this new version I wanted to do something a little different. Instead of doing a by-hand approach, I decided to go with raw-edge, fusible appliqué. There is no one way that you have to do appliqué just like there’s no one way that you have to make a quilt. You can do what you want and how you want it.

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

With raw-edge, fusible appliqué there are different things to consider. For me, I’d need to make sure to have a fusible product on hand that I felt comfortable using. (I used Lite Steam-A-Seam 2, which in general is fine.) I’m not always happy with the stiff-ness or bulk that using a fusible can add to the final project, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing when what I’m making is a wall hanging–my project plan here. For this reason and others, it’s a really good idea to do a few tests with all of the materials you plan to use.

The other thing I wanted to think about is how I would finish it. While some of the fusible products say you don’t have to stitch down your fused pieces, I do like the idea of securing my work so everything stays in place over time. I’m making a wall hanging, and I don’t anticipate washing it often (or ever), but I want it to look polished.

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The quilting is a great place to think about this. Since it needs to be quilted anyway, why not use quilting to further secure and enhance all of the pieces? For these reasons I knew I’d want to do some matchstick (or close-together and dense) quilting.

Picking a Palette

After deciding on technique, I needed to pick my palette. I LOVE picking a palette! It is especially exciting on a project like this where you’re arranging the pieces in place and it can feel like a painting or an exciting adventure in composition.

Clay Kept Quilt fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

What I usually do is to go with my gut. I knew I wanted this blue print from the new collection for the background. It looks like a bathroom tile or a wallpaper to me. I like that it gives the background a little bit of texture, but it can also be a great support for whatever colors and prints I want to add on top.

Sometimes it is helpful to get your background fabric nailed down first. Then you have something to audition the appliqué choices. Or the reverse could also be true if you had a great selection of fabrics for the appliqués. Then it’s just a matter of swapping out background options until you find the one that works best.

Clay Kept Quilt fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

My appliqué fabrics are a mix of prints from Kept and their coordinating solids in a range of various shades and colors.

The Clay Kept Quilt

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I really enjoyed laying everything out. After preparing my background, I laid it on the floor. (A design wall would be great too!) Next I cut out my pieces and arranged them onto the background, moving things around as I wished and as I added more pieces. If there is something I like, like certain shapes or colors grouped together, I might do more of it, and if there is something I don’t like, I try to do less of it. This constant back and forth of asking myself what I’m liking and not liking is not just helpful, but it makes the project more engaging and fun.

After I’m happy with the layout, I fused the pieces to the background, basted the quilt and got to quilting.

Here’s a great tip from Jacquie Gering when you are using a fusible product. In one of her lectures, I learned to use eyeglass cleaner to clean your needle frequently when quilting a project with fusible. A big drawback of using any fusible is how it can gum up your needle. I’ve found that this trick really helps! I’d clean my needle after a couple of passes on the quilt, which took extra time, but saved in frustration in the end.

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The binding is this bright Orangeade Kona solid. When making a wall hanging, sometimes I love how a good, contrasting binding can act as a frame. This one is bright and cheerful.

Clay Kept Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern and Fabric Details

Pattern: Clay Quilt Pattern, Wall Size

Fabric(s): Kept and the coordinating solids (Kona, Essex Speckle)

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Meet, Kept–my newest fabric collection.

Meet kept–my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

kept fabric . carolyn friedlander

I have a new fabric collection, and it is called Kept. This is a small, 12-piece group that has a mellow feel and the ability to go with the flow.

kept fabric . carolyn friedlander

The designs themselves are inspired by collections of things that I have kept. These are things like shapes found in studio stuff, patterns I come across in my daily life and design ideas that roll around in my head. The mix of textures and shape goes from hand drawn and linear to bold and geometric.

kept fabric and kept coordinates . carolyn friedlander

As is usual with a new collection comes a brand-new group of coordinates to go along with it. I love bringing in coordinates that can broaden the character and expand on the possibilities of any collection. These can go alongside Kept or inspire a starting point all their own.

kept fabric and coordinates . carolyn friedlander

I’ve made a variety of projects using my Kept collection and the coordinates to celebrate just some of the creative possibilities. I don’t know about you, but while spending so much time at home during a challenging year I’ve found great comfort in sewing and all of the levels of creativity that it offers. From embracing color, to working with different fabrics, to indulging in projects big and small, practical and comforting–sewing is a very good thing for us to embrace right now.

kept fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

I’ll be sharing more about each of the projects in the coming weeks. If you’d like to see an overview of all of them now, check out this new video that I put together. And let me know what you think!

I made most of the projects above with the big exception of the AMAZING quilted coat and tote. They were made by Brittney Frey (using the Sapporo Coat pattern and Sylvie Tote pattern), and they are just dreamy.

kept fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

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Bartow Quilt in Collection CF fabrics.

I love a project that shows little bits of many different things, and that’s what my Bartow Quilt in Collection CF fabrics is all about.

collection CF Bartow quilt . carolyn friedlander

This design goes back to 2014 and the 30th anniversary of Kona Cotton. I was asked to design a free project, and Bartow is what I came up with. (You can read about it in my previous blog post here.)

Bartow Kona Quilt_Carolyn Friedlander

There’s even another version that I started at the same time as the first one, but I didn’t complete until last year. Ha!

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

(You can read all about that version here.)

Back to my new Collection CF version.

collection CF Bartow quilt . carolyn friedlander

What I love about this project is how the design creates a gallery of color, fabric or whatever you want it to be in all of the little pieced snippets. With so many colors and prints in this new (old) collection, I wanted a quilt that would capture little bits of all of it. This made Bartow an easy choice!

Fabric selection and planning is made easy because Bartow works from a charm pack (5″ squares). To recreate mine, all you need is a CF charm pack, your background fabric and a binding fabric that will fill in for a bit of the pieced top as well.

collection CF charm pack

The background for this one is Kona Natural.

collection CF Bartow quilt . carolyn friedlander

I chose this binding, because I liked the color and how it would frame the quilt. Plus I liked it being used in some of the piecing in the top as well.

My mom Kathy Friedlander pieced the top, and Gina Pina quilted it with an allover grid (just like in one of the previous ones.)

collection CF Bartow quilt . carolyn friedlander

This is one of those quilts that is fun to lay with, because you notice different fabrics each way it’s turned.

You can find the fabric info and pattern on the Robert Kaufman site here, and I’ve also created a special pattern page on my site as well here.

pattern: Bartow (free!) found here

fabric: Collection CF, Kona Natural

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Rye Marmalade

My newest pattern is all about 2 tones, but it doesn’t have to be! This Rye Marmalade version starts to show how you can change things up.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

One problem with selecting fabric pairs is that once you start looking for them, it can be hard to stop finding some that you are excited about. After sewing up some pairings that I was excited about, I decided to combine them together into the same quilt. I liked how the different sections and combinations interpreted the shapes a bit differently, and also how the different colors worked so nicely as a group.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric can change the look of a design so much, and here you can really see that. There are 3 different sections; some use solids, some use nearly solids and some use more bold-ish prints.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Solids can give you super sharp shapes, like in the Marmalade section on the right. The left section uses 2 softer prints from my Collection CF line. This softens the shapes a bit, and I feel like it blends everything together nicely. It is a combo that makes me really happy.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The top right corner features a more bold print from Jetty, and you get a much more textured and less defined effect. Kind of neat, right?

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There are 2 block sizes in the pattern that can be used separately or together. Here I mixed the block sizes together, and I also incorporated borders in to each color group to balance out the motifs and to give them some space.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric for the binding was not as obvious a choice as it was in my previous Rye quilts. For the first two, I matched the binding to the border, because I wanted the binding and border to feel like a background for the design to rest on. In this case, I wanted a similar effect, but without an obvious background, I needed to audition a few of my choices. In the end, I chose one of the fabrics from Jetty that was already used in the quilt. I like the way it blends into most of the sections, while also giving it good texture.

There we have it. A different way to take my newest project Rye!

pattern: Rye quilt pattern

fabric: Jetty, Collection CF, Kona Suede and Marmalade

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Circles Quilt In Harriot Fabric.

One of the first things I made for the release was this Circles Quilt in Harriot fabric.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I couldn’t wait to cut up those scallops! They turn into such interesting shapes as both the appliqué and the background. (The green ones above kind of start to look like hair and little faces.)

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

Circles was the very first appliqué pattern in the Slow Sewing Studio. I liked this one being the first because of it being a great starting point for someone new to the technique. The efficiency of shape and process (each cut set of shapes becomes both the circle and the background) make it really approachable. Plus, the versatility of the block makes it fun to explore in all types of colors and fabrics. If you’re looking to try appliqué, it’s a perfect starting point, and if you’re familiar with the technique, it’s still fun too. Plus, the blocks are pretty big. When you have one finished–it’s definitely something to work with!

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is all big-stitch hand quilted with colorful threads. I love bringing that extra texture and color into the project. Plus, the vertical lines on some of the prints are helpful quilting guides.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I hadn’t made a Circles quilt in awhile, and I’m so glad that I found an excuse to make this one.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Circles

fabric(s): Harriot, Essex, Essex Yarn Dyed, Kona Cotton

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

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Bartow Quilt Finally Finished.

This quilt top has been sitting around in the studio since 2014. But good news, this Bartow quilt is finally finished!

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Back in 2014 Robert Kaufman released a new batch of Kona solids, and my Bartow design became a pattern that I created for that release. (Free pattern here, and notes on the first version here.) I’m pretty sure that this version was my first version, or at least it was where I got inspiration for the design.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

At a Quilt Market around that time I saw a charm pack featuring a custom palette of Konas by Elizabeth Hartman. Elizabeth does a great job putting together colors, and I really liked this set and how they were arranged.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I wanted to have little slivers of all of the great colors transitioning in the same way that her charm pack was arranged across the quilt. Maybe it looks tricky, but it was pretty simple. I kept her colors in order and sewed them up by following the Bartow pattern. On my other Bartow quilt I kept the borders the same color as the background, but here I opted for colorful ones with a little bit of print mixed in. I think the borders here are mostly Flame Kona.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The top has been finished since 2014 and was sitting on a shelf in the studio. I dug it out and sent it off to Gina Pina to quilt. She quilted it up with a 1″ grid, and I just LOVE it.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

As for the binding, I had it in my mind to use a piece from Friedlander Lawn, but as I was sewing it together I realized I had a scrap of Polk binding that would be perfect to mix in as well.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back is one of my Friedlander Wide prints. This colorway has been one of my favorites from that collection. It adds just the right pop to the back.

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Feels good to have it finished!

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern: Bartow (free pattern from me via Robert Kaufman)

Bartow Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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Cutting Up My Kona Card.

I have been planning on cutting up my Kona card for a while now. It has been a few years since cutting up an older Kona card, and my lack of a system for that one (they were all thrown into a box) plus the addition of many new colors has made working with it an ongoing mess.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

Earlier this year, I did a rough poll to see how others are organizing their color cards, and the answers were really helpful! I recapped some of those different styles and approaches in this newsletter if you’d like to see.

The systems I saw ranged wildly in terms of additional materials required, time investment to set up and resulting usability. I love being organized, and I love how being organized can help you work more efficiently, but it’s also important to weigh the options.

For me, I prefer a direction that requires the least amount of upfront time and extra materials to set up, with the most appropriate level of usability in the end. Not only am I often picking swatches to coordinate with collections and to use for projects, but I also like seeing all of the colors as a whole. Because of that, I like the idea of having a way to see all of the colors together, as well as to work with them individually. With two color cards, and I knew that I could keep one intact and I could cut the other one up. With just 1 card, it might be better to go in a different direction, maybe one like @modernhandcraft installed, which is impressive, but that would also require a lot of time and equipment to set up, as well as the physical space to put it. I’m not mad at a system that I can fold up and put away.

Instead, I was drawn toward @houseonhillroad’s approach which uses a special box to store the swatches. I think her box is one for storing embroidery floss that you could find at a craft store, but I also heard of others using tackle boxes and other things similar.

To be honest, all of this was fantasy thinking, because projects like these aren’t usually my favorite. They can be easy for me to dream about but not anything I’m quick to act on. There are too many other things I’d rather be doing and making! However, the stars aligned and I happened to find the perfect slotted container at the Dollar Store, when I was there rooting around for something else. I picked it up hoping it would be about the right size, and it turns out that it totally was! Yay! Plus, it was only $1. You can’t beat that.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

There were many good tips that I learned from others. For one, I numbered the back of each of my swatches as well as their position on the uncut card. This way, I can easily find what I’m looking for AND put it back when I’m done with it.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

It really helps to cut the swatches to the same size. This was made easier by the fact that the newest Kona color card has standard sizes for the colors. Because of the layouts on some of the older cards, the swatches were different sizes. Having them all the same size makes everything easier to work with, and it makes them stack up so nicely.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

This new system is already paying off in terms of time, mess and general convenience. Even though it took me a few hours to cut up and number the card and swatches, I’ve easily made that up in how easy it is to work with. I would totally make myself do this again with the release of a newer color card. Now having done it, I know how much easier it has made everything. It might not have been at the top of my list before, but it will be higher on the list moving forward.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

I should note that I tried punching holes into a couple of the swatches. Also while at the Dollar Store, I nabbed some book rings, and I thought it could be nice to put the colors for certain projects into their own ring while I was working with them. I quickly discovered that you’d need either a stronger hole punch, a drill and/or more physical strength than I was willing and able to put into it, so I abandoned that direction after a couple of failed attempts. If I feel inspired, I can bust out my drill and add some holes in the future. For now, all is great.

Cutting Up My Kona Card . Carolyn Friedlander

You can find a Kona color card on the google or at shops like ilovefabric and plenty of others. Just make sure to get the latest card with all 340 colors, and you’ll be set.

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Meet Babson.

Last up of the newbies is Babson, a very graphic and fun-to-sew project.

Babson Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is kind of like Eads in that it’s super mix and matchable, works with a bunch of different fabrics, can be made without a ton of planning and has a huge amount of possible outcomes. It’s about fabrics, shapes and colors playing together in all kinds of ways.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Unlike Eads (which works with fat quarters), Babson starts with 5″ squares. I find that when you have an easy increment to start with, it’s much easier to grab a pile of stuff you’re interested in (or just a few things) and get to sewing. What’s better than that?

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

On the pattern-design side, there’s also a big part of me that loves the challenge of figuring out possibilities for 5″-square packs. They can be so enticing, and I have many stacked around in the studio. This project can work well with them.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In this first version, maybe you’ll notice how my blocks are broken down into quadrants, each having its own coloring. One quadrant uses one 5″-square pack, plus 4 fat quarters. (Or you can also just use fat quarters for the whole thing.) I liked this formula because it makes it a much easier undertaking. Rather than feeling overwhelmed by a heap of blocks and fabric, you can work on it in sections, as well as flavor each section a little bit differently.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I used the same 5″-square pack of Polk for each quadrant, but in each group I added 4 different coordinates, so they each look a little bit different. Here’s what I added.

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom left – Kona Roasted Pecan, Essex Yarn (Dyed Berry), Architextures (Sorbet, Orangeade)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top left – Architextures (Desert Green), Kona Parchment, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Essex Yarn Dyed (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Top right – Kona Paris Blue, Architextures (Acid Lime), Essex Yarn Dyed (Pickle), Essex Classic Wovens (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Bottom right – Kona Sea Glass, Essex Classic Wovens (Natural), Architextures (White), Essex Homespun (Chambray)

Babson Quilt Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

In the end, I like the cohesion of the whole thing, and then I also like noticing the differences of the sections once you start looking closer. It was entertaining to sew, because each section presented new colors and possibilities.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The next version started with this Melon Kona charm pack. I’m not normally a pink person, but the mix of oranges and peaches pack a nice punch, and I was totally enamored.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

Instead of making the larger throw size as before, I wanted to make a wall hanging, which is basically just a 1/4 of what’s required for the throw. After much debate, my additions to the Melon charm pack for this version were 2 pieces from Polk (AFR-17841-380, AFR-17841-14), plus Kona Orangeade and Kona Lingerie.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

These additions add brightness, texture and little bit of print.

Melon Babson swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

The blocks in this design are super versatile, and I tried to push them in a different direction than in the first version. Here I gathered all of the same-direction shapes at the top, and the other-direction shapes at the bottom. As much as possible, I used the orangey-brights to create the L’s, but then shifted it a bit as you get to the bottom.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now that I’ve made two, I still have ideas for a few more. Plus, I have some other charm packs lying around that I think will be fun.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s Babson! I can’t wait to see what you make. You can ask about it at your local quilt store, or you can also find the digital version available here.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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Meet Polk, my newest fabric collection.

Meet Polk, my newest fabric collection.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Polk is an 8-piece collection printed on Robert Kaufman’s Essex Yarn Dyed Homespun–a substrate that I’ve loved ever since they first released it. Homespun, like their regular Essex, is a cotton/linen blend, but what I really like about it is the woven grid created by how the light and dark yarns are woven to create it. It’s really lovely!

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s also a super useful fabric. Like regular Essex, Homespun is a dream to work with–for quilts, clothes, accessories. It can stand up to a massive number of tasks and desired sewing projects. The utility coupled with the rich texture and look made it a no brainer that I wanted to pitch some design ideas for a collection using it.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn FriedlanderPolk is just that. The designs themselves take some of the ideas from Gleaned a step further. I found that I wasn’t quite done playing with those shapes, plus I like the idea of there being a continuation since one of my favorite things to do with linen collections is to mix them with printed cotton collections–it’s so much fun and the results can be beautiful.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Another neat thing about this collection is that I was able to create some new base colors for the Homespun range. Previously, they offered some great neutrals, and so it was no question that I wanted to add an exciting orange (thanks Orangeade!), a vibrant blue (Paris Blue) and a beautiful brown (Roasted Pecan). These three additions, mixed with some of the great existing neutral shades make up the base fabrics for this collection.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Polk Petal Pouch

Polk West Water Tunic

Polk Adeline Dress

The artwork on top is printed in an array of colors to complement and add interest to the base color. The deep blue print has a really interesting effect that comes across kind of like a starry night sky. While I keep looking at that one in new ways depending on the project, all of them have a little something different to offer as well. It’s been fun figuring out projects and fabric combinations to explore those different things.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Of course, I have some new projects coming down the pipeline…and I’m ready to share a couple peeks of 2 of them here, plus an old favorite revisited.

First up is Davie, a new house project with a fun twist on how to use your fabrics. It’s fat-quarter friendly, and I was especially drawn to creating a design where you can get progressive with your fabric choices and the way they transition. Plus, houses are really fun.

Polk Davie Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is Lusk–the first of a new group of mini quilt patterns. I cannot get enough of making minis.

Polk Lust Quilts . Carolyn Friedlander

Each one take shapes and motifs from some of my previous patterns or new ones, and reimagined them in new ways, at new sizes and in new relationships on a smaller scale. Minis can be the perfect way to explore ideas, they make great gifts and they are also some of my favorite things to dress up a wall.

Polk Lust Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Third is a Park quilt in Polk. (And kind of a tongue twister!)

This one actually started out as a new set of pillow shams (like what is shown on the pattern cover), but before too long, I found myself with too many block pairings that I wanted to try, and so a larger quilt was born!

Polk Park Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

(By the way, my Park pattern is newly available in PDF form on my site. You can grab a copy here.)

And then I was also eager to sew up some other things too. (Of course!) Like I mentioned, this collection is well suited for all types of projects–not just quilts.

Polk Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ll be sharing more about all of the projects above in upcoming posts, but for now some of the patterns/tutorials include (from top left): West Water Tunic by Squam, Portside Dopp Kit by Grainline, Petal Pouch by Noodlehead, Pencil Pouch Tutorial by Noodlehead, Adeline Dress by Style Arc.

Polk Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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Meet Gleaned, my newest fabric collection.

Meet Gleaned, my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

This collection is a merry mix of patterns and textures gleaned from nature.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

When designing this line, I became very interested in patterns that already exist in nature. I was inspired to learn more about how they work, and then I felt challenged to make each one of them my own. In looking at motifs that have already been around, I loved rethinking of them in a way that felt personal but could also serve many different types of projects well.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

Coloring a collection is always a really fun and important part of the fabric-design process. With this collection, there was a richness that was on my mind, but I also wanted some fun pops as well. In the end, there’s a boldness as well as a softness that creates a workable range that can do its own thing OR mix in nicely with my other collections and other stuff. It’s fun to spice things up, don’t you think?

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

Gleaned is a 24-piece collection, which feels big enough, but also not too big to be overwhelming. It’s super mix and matchable–always my favorite thing to explore when I have new fabric in hand.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

In addition to a big mix of colors, there are several designs with special selvage treatments. (I think those are super fun to make and play with!)

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

In addition to Gleaned, there are also some new coordinates from my architectures collection–both the text print and crosshatch print.

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

And I’ve also put together a set of Gleaned coordinating solids. This group is a mix of Kona cottons, Essex and Homespun linen/cottons. It’s a textural and colorful delight! (Or, I least I think so…)

gleaned coordinating solids . carolyn friedlander

gleaned coordinating solids . carolyn friedlander

gleaned coordinating solids . carolyn friedlander

Maybe you notice some new Konas in there? Robert Kaufman has a new batch of colors, and I am beyond stoked about many of them. Of course, several of them made it into this bundle.

gleaned coordinating solids . carolyn friedlanderHere’s a look at 2 of my new patterns (to be released this fall). There are 2 more in the works, but you’ll get to see those later.

First up is a paper-pieced project called, Russell.

Russell Quilt in Gleaned Coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

Russell is a super-fun project that plays with color, planning and story. Included in the pattern is a coloring page and ideas for how to map your colors and placement. In this version, I’ve used all of the new architextures coordinates plus some of my favorite new konas.

(On a side note, you might recognize this project from my contribution to Glamp Stitchalot last summer. Ever since that adventure, I’ve been wanting to turn the idea into a complete quilt.)

The other project that I’m ready to share is called Wainwright. Wainwright is new to my appliqué line, and this version uses all of the new stuff–gleaned and the architextures coordinates. It works with fat eighths, and is a perfect project for playing with color, composition and fabric. Plus, it’s one where the blocks are sized to be addictive…but more on that later.

Wainwright quilt in Gleaned Fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s a look at 2 of the new patterns. Stay tuned for more to come in the next few months–including a couple more new patterns.

I hope you like the new stuff, and I cannot wait to see what you make!

gleaned fabric and coordinates . carolyn friedlander

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