Tag Archives | paper-piecing

Grove Quilt in Collection CF

My Grove Quilt Pattern was one of my very first patterns that I launched back in 2011. It’s a design I still stand by, and I’m so happy to have a new version to show you. Here is my new Grove Quilt in Collection CF.

Grove Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The Design

Having spent most of my life surrounded by orange groves, I find there to be something really beautiful about their long rows and reaching branches. This design celebrates that with angular shapes that can be softened or highlighted with the color and fabrics you choose. Over the years, it’s been fun to see how these shapes play out in solids, prints and all kinds of colors.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

With new fabrics coming out in Collection CF, I knew this would be a perfect project to show them off. Some of the prints are more bold, and some are softer and read more like a solid. This print mix plays with the shapes in an interesting way.

collection CF fabric . carolyn friedlander

Fabric Selection

First I explored going with more of a uniform color palette, mixing the new pieces with some of the previous pieces in the collection. This one is heavy on the cool shades, and although I didn’t ultimately go with it, I think it would be very lovely!

fabric planning . carolyn friedlander

The way I’m auditioning the fabrics in the pic, the top two pieces would each be a tree, and the fabrics underneath would be the background for those trees. There are 12 blocks in the project. Of course you could mix it up and have different background fabrics too.

Ultimately I decided that I liked how the newest pieces worked together on their own, and this project would be a good way to show that off. The 15 new colors offer a good mix of lights and darks.

collection CF fabric 2020 . carolyn friedlander

I used 6 of the 15 pieces for backgrounds, which means each is used in 2 blocks. Then I used the rest of the fabrics to make the trees, with 3 of them being used for 2 blocks and the rest for 1 each.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

As for the sashing, I waited until I had all of my blocks made before deciding on that. Do you like picking this stuff out at the beginning, or do you tend to wait? I think I’m more often a wait-er. Sometimes I’ll have something in mind, but I pretty much always wait to auditione the different options with the actual blocks.

With the sashing I chose, I like how it adds some serious visual texture while still allowing the trees to pop. You could imagine how a darker choice would frame the blocks–just depends on the look you are going for!

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

Going with a dark border gives the quilt a nice frame. I really debated going with a something light and subtle, which I think could have worked nicely too. That would have been a totally different outcome.

Quilting

The quilting is straight-ish lines via free motion quilting. I outlined all of the trees first, and then I quilted in some repeated lines in the background. From the back you can really see it on the dark backing fabric. I like how this gives you an echo of the design on the back.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander
the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

The Pattern

The pattern has been fully updated, and now it also includes a bonus mini tree block. I have a couple of new quilts using the mini block, and I’ll be sharing them here soon.

In terms of skill, it’s intermediate foundation paper piecing with plenty of guidance. On this pattern I have a full cheat sheet for you on the sizes of fabric to cut for each section of the block. If you’re new and want the guidance, it’s there for you. Or if you’re a confident paper piecer–do as you wish!

Pattern: Grove Quilt Pattern

Fabric: Collection CF, new 2020 colors

collection CF fabric quilts . carolyn friedlander

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Rye Marmalade

My newest pattern is all about 2 tones, but it doesn’t have to be! This Rye Marmalade version starts to show how you can change things up.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

One problem with selecting fabric pairs is that once you start looking for them, it can be hard to stop finding some that you are excited about. After sewing up some pairings that I was excited about, I decided to combine them together into the same quilt. I liked how the different sections and combinations interpreted the shapes a bit differently, and also how the different colors worked so nicely as a group.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric can change the look of a design so much, and here you can really see that. There are 3 different sections; some use solids, some use nearly solids and some use more bold-ish prints.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Solids can give you super sharp shapes, like in the Marmalade section on the right. The left section uses 2 softer prints from my Collection CF line. This softens the shapes a bit, and I feel like it blends everything together nicely. It is a combo that makes me really happy.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The top right corner features a more bold print from Jetty, and you get a much more textured and less defined effect. Kind of neat, right?

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There are 2 block sizes in the pattern that can be used separately or together. Here I mixed the block sizes together, and I also incorporated borders in to each color group to balance out the motifs and to give them some space.

Rye Marmalade Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric for the binding was not as obvious a choice as it was in my previous Rye quilts. For the first two, I matched the binding to the border, because I wanted the binding and border to feel like a background for the design to rest on. In this case, I wanted a similar effect, but without an obvious background, I needed to audition a few of my choices. In the end, I chose one of the fabrics from Jetty that was already used in the quilt. I like the way it blends into most of the sections, while also giving it good texture.

There we have it. A different way to take my newest project Rye!

pattern: Rye quilt pattern

fabric: Jetty, Collection CF, Kona Suede and Marmalade

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Architextures Sunrise.

My Architextures Sunrise quilt comes with a bit of an admission. I made it back in 2012 when Architextures first came out. It was displayed in the Architextures booth at Quilt Market that fall, but I never got around to taking pictures of it afterwards–classic. When I was planning the PDF conversion for the design, I knew I wanted to unearth this quilt and give it some time to shine.

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I can still remember how much I enjoyed making it. It was one of the first times sewing with my own fabric, and that experience is hard to forget. Because the design works well with 2-1/2″ strips, I used strip sets from my Architextures collection as well as the coordinating solids. This made it super easy to get to the fun stuff, which is figuring out your fabric pairings and placements and sewing them together. I love a project where you can explore different color and print combinations as you go, and this project is perfect for that.

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The frames are Kona Cactus, one of my favorites at the time. It’s so vibrant. This was before there was Pickle, Wasabi, Acid lime or any of the other greens that I’d grow to love as well. Is it just me, or do you remember your early favorite solids? (For the record – Cactus, Coral and Tangerine were some of those for me.)

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s not too much to get wrong about this block, which makes it pretty carefree and easy. In some of my other Sunrise projects, I worked the fabrics and colors symmetrically within the blocks. In this sample I didn’t do that, but instead took the placement in a different direction. I like this effect as well.

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Once you get them all framed out and sewn together with the sashing and border, it’s a cohesive (and cheerful) look.

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

fabrics: architextures and the coordinating Kona solids

pattern: Sunrise

Architextures Sunrise Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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