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Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Yay, I’m so glad that you’re joining in! And I’m really excited to hear that many of you are happy about the year-long format. It’ll be good!

This week I’m doing a bit of an overview, and I’m going to show you some different ways to think about the project. I always love a project that can be translated in different ways, and Hunt fits that calling perfectly.

You’ve already seen this version.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

It (more here) is a celebration of color and texture, and it also shows the idea that you don’t have to treat every piece the same. In addition to using many colors, prints and wovens for the appliqués (or cut shapes), I fussy cut different sections from the scallop print in Harriot to add interest and variety to the shapes. Here are some that I cut first, before auditioning in the project.

Hunt scallop cutting . carolyn friedlander

Although I used many different fabrics for the appliqués, I used the same fabric for the background. I feel like that makes the different colors really pop.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also this one that you’re familiar with.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In contrast to the previous example, this version only features 2 colors–and actually just one fabric (see here.) With a 2-color project, you can see how much of a visual impact you can make.

Another 2-color example is the vest I made using Hunt.

Hunt Appliquéd Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ve seen this before too, but it’s a good thing to bring up, because I want you to see that you don’t have to think about this design as only ending up as a quilt. These motifs can thrown on just about anything–clothing, bags, whatever!

As a little bonus, here’s a look at another idea I explored early on.

In addition to a 2-color direction, I also considered mixing it up and using different fabrics for the appliqués on the vest. There was also some play with the placement, but what a different look!

And now to some other things to think about that you may not have seen…

First up is a block using my newest fabric. It’s a block from when I was considering making a Hunt sample for the release. I ended up focusing on other things, but here it is. The new collection is all dark and moody, which I thought would set a neat tone. As far as the layout was concerned, I imagined using different 2-color fabric combinations within each block. This would give you another effect, and I’m still intrigued by the idea.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

On a side note, while basting this project I was reminded of how much I enjoy this part of the process. It’s repetitive, satisfying and very relaxing. At the end of a long day, this is the perfect thing.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

Another example in quilting cotton is this block that started as a demo piece for Quilt Market last fall and has stayed a class demo and sample. In terms of color and fabric, I’m sometimes drawn to combinations that are not always high in contrast and can speak to a theme. The blues in these fabrics are similar-ish in value, but the shades of them are pretty different. It almost clashes in a way that I really love.

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus the prints themselves (mostly from Harriot) play off of each other in a neat way. Lines and grids and texture are all coming together.

This one is a great example of how awesome it is to see the shapes separate and start to define themselves as they get turned under during appliqué. I love this reveal between the shapes in this pattern. I really want to see this one appliquéd!

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s another block made from quilting cotton. This one was my very first tester block when I was playing with the motif. It too doesn’t have a ton of contrast in terms of the fabric that I chose. It’s soft and subtle. One of the fussy-cuttable motifs from Friedlander was fun to cut up and use.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

As a general note, working with quilting cotton will be the easiest place to start with this project and with appliqué in general.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

Now for some other technical approaches!

Here is a raw-edge, fused and matchstick-quilted sample that I made to show off some other ways you could take this project in terms of technique.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the shapes were first fused to the background, then layered with batting and backing, and lastly quilted with lots of straight lines close together. This is a totally different approach, and it has a really nice effect.

In this case, you’d cut your shapes from the template without seam allowances, because it’s raw edge, and you’re not turning anything under.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

You can also mix techniques in the same project and even in the same block. Here I appliquéd some of the shapes normally (on the background panel), and then I sandwiched it together with batting and backing, and have started quilting in the motif.

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

I’d love to see something like this played out across multiple blocks together. I think it could look really great!

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

This panel is simply embroidered (with my favorite bright orange embroidery floss). (Although, not finished, yet…)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Simple idea, but it’s another great way to explore the motif. (You’d use the seam-free template here too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Wholecloth is also a possibility. Pick a plain fabric or one with something going on–either way, I think it could be a neat direction to go.

Wholecloth Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

(This would use the seam-free template too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it, a few ways to look at the project. And that’s just the start! I hope seeing these examples is helpful as you start to think about the direction you want to go.

I’ll leave things here for now, and I’m including some relevant resources below if you’re interested in a deeper dive.

Let me know what you think, and I’m really glad you’re following along!

Resources:

+ Some of you asked for recommendations on good places to start with appliqué. My Trudy block on Creative Bug is a fantastic place to get some practice if you’re looking to do that before starting in on your own Hunt. Not only is this a very manageable size, but the videos will walk you through all the same steps technical steps that you’ll be using to make Hunt as well. Like Hunt, my Trudy block gives you an opportunity to work on outside curves–in this case they’re nice and gentle–which is good practice before tackling the tighter, outside curves in Hunt. (If you’re wanting a more indepth look at appliqué, you can see this other project from me on Creative Bug as well.)

+ If you’re curious about supplies, read about my favorite appliqué tools in my blog post here.

+ If you still need a copy of the pattern or templates, you can find the pattern here and the templates here.

+ If you’re following along, I’d love to see your progress! Feel free to share using #huntQAL … And there might be some giveaways as we go along.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

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Sunrise Pillow Shams

I made some Sunrise Pillow shams for some friends.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Something keeps me coming back to the mini blocks of this project. There are 2 different mini sizes included with the pattern, and I love making both of them. In this project, I used the smallest of them (or block C in the pattern).

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

One nice thing about mini blocks is that they are extremely scrap friendly. I like putting scraps to use–it feels efficient and also productive, like you’re cleaning too by getting rid of a pile. Plus it’s always magical when surprising fabric combinations find their way to each other, which I feel happens more often when you’re working from a pile of scraps.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

These shams were a gift for some friends that were getting married. I liked the symbolism of new beginnings with the block, and I liked incorporating many of my fabrics as well as little bits of Liberty fabrics since one of the recipients loves Liberty too. As for the color palette, I wanted something neutral but also with some life. When I make a gift for someone, I try to hone in on colors that the recipient loves, as well make something that is somewhat versatile. A neutral palette can be great for that.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

After piecing the blocks, I sewed them together and added a border to create the right size for the shams that I was going for. I believe these are on 18″ pillow forms.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Then I did some straight-line quilting, added some piping, and finished them with an envelope-style back for slipping the shams on and off.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Usually when I’m working on something scrappy, I’ll wait until all of my blocks are pieced before deciding on a border. Here a print from Polk was just what I wanted to finish them off, and a print from Friedlander worked well on the back.

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it–a set of shams for some friends!

Sunrise Pillow Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Fabric(s): Mostly mine from many collections and some Liberty of London too

Pattern: Sunrise Quilt (I used the bonus Mini block C.)

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A Batch Of Thread Catchers.

I did manage to crank out a batch of thread catchers for some of my local sewing buds. I’ve been wanting to do this for some time, and our holiday get together gave me the perfect excuse to do it.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Even with a lot going on, I was very glad to steal away a few hours to make a little something for each of them. And, most of the fabrics were leftovers from other recent projects that were sitting in piles needing to get sorted, so it was kind of like tidying the studio a bit too!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I used this tutorial to make a regular and a mini for each person. I’ve updated the tutorial to include both sizes. (Scroll down to the bottom of the tutorial for the adjustments to make the mini.) Personally, I like having both size options, because sometimes you need more and sometimes you need less. They each satisfy two different needs.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

I probably could have made myself a couple more while I was at it, because I didn’t seem to have one handy a few times this week when I could have used one. Does anyone else end up with makeshift thread piles or is it just me?

Next time…

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

These guys are pretty speedy, and I really liked pairing up the different fabric combinations. In the end I let everyone pick their own. It was fun to see who picked what–many lined up as I thought they might and others surprised me a bit.

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

Lots of thread catchers!

thread catchers . carolyn friedlander

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