Tag Archives | quilting

Ray Quilt Along #4: Baste and Quilt.

Ray Quilt Along #4: Baste and Quilt.

Basting my Ray Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Who’s ready to baste and quilt? I have to say that it always feels like a big milestone to get a project basted and ready to quilt. Since I’ll be hand quilting this one, that means I can get the Netflix and couch ready!

Here’s the video.

Because of all that we’re covering this week, this video is longer than the others. As with all of my videos, you can make use of the “Chapters” in the description to jump around to any sections you wish to revisit.

I share some thoughts about batting in the video, and if you’d like to use what I’m using I put together a listing for it in my shop.

quilters dream batting . carolyn friedlander

What’s your favorite way to baste your project? Do you use your cutting table like I do? And how are you thinking you’ll quilt your project? I’d love to know what you are thinking about.

quilting my Ray quilt . carolyn friedlander

The Quilt Along will be taking a break for the next 2 weeks. I’ll see you back here on December 31, 2020 with the final part of the project! Your homework for the next couple of weeks is to get your quilt basted and quilted.

You can do this! Share what you are working on using the #cfRAYqal on Instagram. I love seeing it.

Supplies:

+ quilt top, batting, backing fabric, Flatter, clamps, safety pins, scissors (small and large), hand quilting supplies, thread (see suppliers below)

Thread Suppliers:

+ Cosmo Sashiko Thread in my shop

+ Snuggly Monkey

+ Brooklyn Haberdashery

+ Upcycle Stitches

+ A Verb For Keeping Warm

Ray Quilt Along #4: Baste And Quilt (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #3: Sew It Together (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #2: Cut It Out (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Along #1: Make A Plan (video on YouTube)

Ray Quilt Pattern

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Hunt QAL #13 Check In

Hunt QAL #13 Check In.

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

Yes, the Hunt QAL is officially over, but I thought I’d continue to check in with you on my quilt until I have it finished, which I don’t think will be too much longer!

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

The hand quilting continues, and I just love doing it. It is so relaxing pushing the needle through the different fabrics and colors. I’m loving using the sashiko threads and just following the marked lines.

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

I’d say that I am 3/4 of the way along. I’ve basically moved from the bottom to the top, so there’s just a little bit left to go. The binding decision is sort of looming at this point.

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

The texture and softness from the hand quilting is really enticing, and I’m loving the darker thread color. I haven’t tried it yet, but I’m eager to see how it will look on the bed.

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

I’m also working my way through this skein of thread. It started out much more full. Part of me hopes I’ll run out so I can switch to another color randomly at the end, but I’m thinking this might be just the right amount to see things through to the end.

Pattern: Hunt Quilt (templates here, here and here)

Fabrics: Mostly mine from many collections including Jetty, Collection CF, Botanics, Instead, Gleaned, Friedlander

Quilting Thread: Sashiko thread from Upcycle Stitches

Hunt QAL Quilt . carolyn friedlander

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Tee: The Knit Quilt Primer and why I love making quilts with knits.

With my first knit collection, Blake, coming out, there was never a plan to make a knit quilt, because why would you? It sounds like a terrible idea, right? Knit stretches, it’s a garment fabric, etc etc, and if you’ve ever made a t-shirt quilt–at least in the popular way which uses interfacing–you know that it’s not the most fun experience. But after working with the knits, I couldn’t get the idea of a knit quilt out of my head. I decided that making a knit quilt wasn’t a bad idea, but instead a very good one, and therefore a new pattern outlining the process was worth pursuing. My Tee quilt pattern is for doing just that–sewing up a knit quilt.

Tee quilt pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

But first, I’ll bet that you have some questions.

Blake Knit Cotton Jersey . Carolyn Friedlander

First, why make a knit quilt?

  1. They’re soft. So damn soft. We love wearing knit for a reason–it feels great–so why not apply that softness to a quilt?
  2. Knit scraps happen. If you’re both a garment sewer and a quilter, I’m sure you’ve felt challenged by the what-to-do-with-those-knit-scraps situation. The desire to make use of our leftovers is real.
  3. T-Shirt quilts, there must be a better way! The interfaced approach to t-shirt quilting isn’t my idea of a fun time, but no judgment if you’re into it! A goal of that method aims to make knits behave more like wovens…which I get, but what’s the point when knits are so wonderful (see point #1) as they are. Plus, the interfacing makes everything super heavy and not-fun to work with, while also requiring an extra step and supply to incorporate it. Neh.
  4. I love a good crossover. To say that I’ve learned a lot about quilting from making garments and vice versa is an understatement. Having a project that acts as a stepping stone for quilters wanting to move into making garments (and garment sewers wanting to make quilts) is a worthwhile opportunity–one that I’m all too eager to support.

If that is all true, then what’s the hold up on knits?

Fear. There’s definitely some fear around knits. (Hence my desire to create a knit resource page for my site.) To be honest, I’m not sure why, and I wonder if there’s some history with woven manufacturers planting seeds of doubt and fear around knits…that’d be pretty juicy, wouldn’t it? (JK on knit conspiracy theories!) But to be serious, there are many qualities with knits that make them different than wovens, and I’ll bet that’s where much of this fear originates.

Let’s start with stretch. It’s probably why most people are scared of sewing with knits, but you shouldn’t be. The stretch is totally manageable and…forgiving. Yes, unlike woven fabrics, knits will bounce back, and knowing this means you can anticipate it and start using it to your advantage. Knit win.

The other fear that I get asked often has to do with raveling. I’m not sure why this is often a concern, because in general knits don’t ravel. The use of a serger or overlock machine is less to prevent raveling and more for providing a seam that will allow for stretch, because in most cases knits are being used in situations requiring that, i.e. a t-shirt or anything that you’re going to want to be moving around in. For this reason, it’s a) not necessary to use a serger for making a knit quilt (although I personally find it super fun to sit behind a serger), and b) not a concern that your seams will do any raveling. In fact, they’ll probably look cleaner than your seams with woven projects! Knit win.

With those thoughts in mind, let’s get back to the quilts and my new pattern, Tee.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

There are 3 versions in this pattern, each building on skills and complexity, and all written for use with either a conventional sewing machine or a serger.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

Version A features squares. There’s a lot you can do with knits that you can’t do with wovens, and this first version explores some of those things which are highlighted and explored in the pattern. Plus, it’s never a bad idea to start with something basic to get a feel for it.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

There are 3 size options for this version, and this one is the baby size. Have I mentioned how soft knit quilts are? They are.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll notice that I rounded the corners, which is outlined in the pattern. I liked the round reference back to a t-shirt, and also how it adds another layer of shape play and interest.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

I used knits from blake entirely for the top, some friedlander lawn for the binding and friedlander (quilting cotton) for the backing.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version A . Carolyn Friedlander

Version B adds in a curve, well 3 of them to be precise.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

This version touches on that crossover project idea in that it can help develop the skills to help you cross over.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

For quilters, learning to conquer sewing an inset circle like this can be a helpful step in conquering inset sleeves. For garment sewers, this works in reverse–your familiarity with sewing in a sleeve will make sewing in this curve feel like you’re still doing the same thing, but in this case you’re working toward a flat result instead of the 3-d sleeve cap. Adding a new twist to something that you’re already familiar with is a perfect way to expand your skills.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

And bonus, because knit stretches, these inset curves are some of the easiest ways to take them on if you’ve never done one before. A great experiment is to try it out using knit and then try it out with a woven.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

This version also has 3 size options included, and this is the largest, which is a throw.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

Blake is used entirely for the top, and friedlander lawn is used for both the binding and the backing. This is the softest version ever.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version B . Carolyn Friedlander

Version C combines both ideas–rectilinear shapes and curves, giving you lots of options for mixing it up. This is super helpful if a) you like a mix, and especially if b) you’re making a t-shirt quilt…which is a big (not-too-secret) agenda of this pattern also. I have big plans for t-shirt quilts using this pattern in my future…

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

There are 3 size options to this version as well, and this is the smallest, a wall hanging.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

This top fabrics are all blake, and the binding and backing are both quilting cottons.

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee Quilt in Blake Knit . Version C . Carolyn Friedlander

In case you’re wondering, because I know that you probably are, and I was…knit quilts are long-armmable. I’ve done some testing with this idea, including a few mins experimenting on my friend’s longarm.

Blake knit quilting on a longarm . Carolyn Friedlander

Despite my amateur longarm skills, this was fun and problem free! It’s also still pretty soft, which I was curious about.

Blake knit quilting on a longarm . Carolyn Friedlander

Yay for knit quilts! This was an incredible amount of fun, and I’m eager to see what you make. As I mentioned, I have plans for a t-shirt quilt for myself next, and I’m also teaching a t-shirt/knit quilt class at QuiltCon in 2018. I’m beyond stoked for this class and will be challenging my students to bring in some fun stuff to work with. We’ll not only cover the technical specifics of knit-quilt sewing, but we’ll also get in to the design aspect of working with different sized pieces and motifs. It’ll be fun.

Tee Quilts in Blake Knit . Carolyn Friedlander

Tee is a booklet-style pattern that is popping up in physical form in stores (like Hawthorne Threads, Jones & Vandermeer, i love fabric), or you can find the digital version in my shop here.

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Eads Quilt Pattern and Quilt Along.

My Eads quilt pattern is one of my newbies. I showed it at Quilt Market in St Louis, and I’m excited to share it with you here now. It’s a lot of fun, but I’m also biased, because I don’t make things that aren’t fun.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I’d been wanting to do a big, graphic, paper-pieced project for a while now, and this spring presented a great opportunity. Eads is a project where lots of fabric and color can play together in new and interesting ways–my favorite type of project.

Eads quilt fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

After nailing down the design, I pulled fabric from many places–friedlander, friedlander lawn, euclid, kona cotton, essex linen… I wanted a big mix of prints, solids and textures to play with and to use to highlight the design in a variety of ways.

(By the way, Robert Kaufman put together a little kit, which you could ask your local shop about. Otherwise, all of the fabrics are also listed here.)

Eads quilt fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

The design works with fat quarters, which makes the fabric gathering pretty easy. After that, the instructions work from strips which then makes it easy to start mapping out your blocks.

Eads quilt fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I love this way of working–first gathering a bunch of inspiring pieces, breaking them down into smaller chunks, and then having the ability to react along the way as you work through the project. I find this to be a massively engaging, creative process and big reason why projects like this are so much fun. Grab your fabric, start making some blocks, throw them up on the design wall, assess, make more blocks and continue to grow your composition.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In the end, my project doesn’t follow a perfect color gradation–although that could be a lovely path to take! But instead, I liked finding new and different relationships between the colors and shapes as I worked. By just shuffling around some fabric, I discovered new color friendships and new ways to expose or conceal the motif itself. So much fun.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m often asked about overcoming creative blocks, and this project is a perfect example of how I keep myself creatively charged. My wheels were turning so much while making this guy, that I couldn’t help but think about other ways to explore the project, things to do with fabric and other things to make in general. I find that creative satisfaction in one place can overflow into many others.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I had such a good time making this project, that I couldn’t help but think about other versions to make while I was making it–always a good sign in my book. Because of that, I thought it’d be fun to do a little quilt along this summer. You interested in joining me?

Eads quilt along . Carolyn Friedlander

The plan is to keep it mostly informal, but I do have a structure in mind that I’ll at least be holding myself to. To make this size, which is a good-sized throw, there are 120 blocks, which at 12 weeks (3 months) is 10 blocks a week. I think that 10 blocks will be a perfect amount of creative cardio to schedule in each week. There are also 48 fabrics in this version, which breaks down to 4 fabrics/week if you want to set goals for that too. Personally, I’m not sure I’ll partake in that way…but it’s a helpful number to consider.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The quilt along will start next week, June 15. Expect weekly blog posts, including the first next week to kick things off. You can also follow along on my Instagram for weekly visuals, as well as in my newsletter (see “subscribe to the newsletter” at the top right corner on this site) for recaps and updates.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

And for you, please join in! I’ll be checking in on anyone else’s makings by scouring the #eadsQAL hashtag on instagram. Since there are so many ways for this project to pan out, it’ll be fun to see where your projects take you. My bet is that we’ll all start to inspire each other, and it’ll be quite merry.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, I’ve got some prizes planned. To be eligible to win, you’ll need to be posting to the hashtag on IG. Sound good?

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

To start, you’ll need a copy of the pattern. Hard copies are starting to appear in shops (like Hawthorne, Fabric Bubb, Etsy Studio, Jones & Vandermeer, I Love Fabric, etc), and the PDF version is available here too. Then start thinking about fabric…fat quarters are perfect.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Oh, and make sure to keep your scraps! I’ve got plans for those, but it’s a surprise to be uncovered towards the end, so stay tuned.

Eads quilt fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Looking forward to sewing with you!

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Fall sewing with Euclid.

I guess it’s getting cooler other places…right? You can’t really tell where I am, but in the spirit of seasons changing and warmer-wardrobes calling, here’s a little bit of fall sewing with Euclid. Bonus, both of these projects are quilty-crossovers. So if you’re wanting a garment project with plenty of quilty familiarity, here you go.

For the record, I’m actually not a fan of looking ahead to cooler temperatures–I prefer the heat–but this time I do have a little more to look forward to, specifically, the cooler-weather goodies that I sewed up waaay earlier this year in Euclid and haven’t gotten a chance to wear. (Note to self: Maybe cool-weather-sewing in Spring is a good idea? It gives you some new pieces to look forward to when you may not be excited about cooler temps otherwise…)

First up, my Quilted Vest in Euclid, (free!) pattern by Purl Soho. Looking at this, reminds me that I still need to sew on my snaps…

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I used wool batting, some architextures in the lining (this one), and machine quilted it. The pattern was relatively easy and straight-forward. Plus, it came together quite quickly.

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Tamarack Jacket in Euclid, pattern by Grainline. It’s a good one! My typical Grainline alteration is to shorten the sleeves a bit, which I did here. Otherwise, no changes were necessary for me. It looks like I also need to sew the closure hooks on this guy…I guess it’s obvious which parts of the project I tend to neglect…

Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like the vest, this is a quilted garment with wool batting, but unlike the vest, this guy is hand quilted. I liked the idea of it being softer and a bit looser. Plus I was able to play with thread color a bit. It’s lined in Cambridge lawn, which makes for the dreamiest of insides. Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Happy fall sewing!!

All photos by Alexis Wharem.

 

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Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I finished this guy. Finally. And it was fun. Here’s a look at my Aerial Grove in Liberty and chambray that I started a little while ago (107 weeks according to Instagram) … with status updates here, here, here, here and most recently here. Wow. Lots of updates. But I guess that’s what happens when you can take your time with something. That last shot was taken when I finally decided to finish it up, and for good reason, because I was going to give it away.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This pattern is a project from my book and one that I’ve now made several times. This version is full of Liberty prints and lots of chambrays and denims.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

One bonus of not finishing this sooner is that I was able to incorporate some euclid.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is such a play on texture, both in the fabrics and the quilting. Liberty lawn is so fine and soft, which makes it seem almost delicate. And the chambrays and denims have a heavier look and feel, but they’re also soft and very textured. I wanted the quilting to enhance that softness and create even more texture. Plus, since I used big stitch, there’s an added layer of color in the quilting too.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I even threw in a leftover Hesperides block. The colors, fabrics and shapes worked, and it wasn’t otherwise being used.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This version is the first that I’ve made with a darker background. (Seen next to my Kona version.)

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back, I went with this lighter blue Widescreen. I like that it adds color, and you’re also able to see the quilting.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : Aerial Grove from Savor Each Stitch

Fabrics : Liberty for the appliqués, denims and chambrays (from Robert Kaufman), euclid, swiss dot chambray, leftover nani iro for the backgrounds, Widescreen for backing.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

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Howard Block on Creative Bug.

Have you been following the Block-Of-The-Month series on Creative Bug? Well, it’s time for another block from me. Meet my Howard block.

Howard Block on Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s a somewhat speedy, architecturally-inspired block that is fun to whip up. I mixed and matched some of my prints from architextures and doe, but I can see things changed up in many different ways. In this class, you’ll learn how easy it is to paper piece this guy, and I’ll bet you can get a few whipped out easily in an afternoon.

So what do you think?

Happy Howard making!

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Classes at QuiltCon 2017.

QuiltCon 2017

Mark your calendars, because registration for QuiltCon 2017 classes is just about a week away (registration opens at 10am EST on June 25). This QuiltCon will be in Savannah, Georgia February 23-26. (yay, East coast!) Savannah is such a picturesque and quintessential southern city that I’m sure it’ll put an interesting spin and flavor on the QuiltCon experience.

I’m looking forward to attending and especially excited to be teaching. And since I’ve had to cut back more and more on my teaching schedule, events like this one are great because they attract a wide and large audience, meaning I can work with more and more folks in one go. Because of that, I thought I’d share a little bit more about each of my classes so that anyone interested can get registered. I’d love to see you in class!

First thing, here’s the catalog and below is the list of my classes with their titles and numbers (and even a pic of me from last year–ha! Oh, the candids…).

Carolyn Friedlander Classes At QuiltCon 2017

I have 3 classes, each covering a different technique and overall design concept/strategy/idea. All of my classes are intermediate-ish skill level, meaning they’ll be great for folks with familiarity with the techniques but craving to take on new challenges.

striped outhouse . carolyn friedlander

First up, on Friday, Feb. 24 is my Paper Piecing with Precision class (#630), a full-day workshop devoted to getting super specific with your paper piecing. I often get asked in class how to make stripes go a certain way, how to position a special motif in the right place or how to work with the smallest scrap possible. In this class, we’ll be working on those exact things, all of which are reasons why I love to paper piece. It can be really entertaining and a great challenge if you’re up for it. We’ll be working from one/some of my patterns, and I’m encouraging students to bring a mix of directional and fussy-cuttable fabrics to play with and to learn from. Any student can take on whatever challenge they feel comfortable with, so if you’re relatively new to paper piecing, you can challenge yourself with the general ideas of being more deliberate, or if you’re fairly confident with paper piecing, you can push yourself even more–either way, I’ll be there with instruction and guidance.

Green Botanics Quilting . Carolyn Friedlander

Next, on Saturday, Feb. 25 is my Design Strategy And Implementation For Home Machine Quilting class (#829), another full-day workshop, but this one is devoted to machine quilting strategy and implementation–what design to use on your top and how to actually quilt it? In this class, I’m encouraging each student to bring one quilt top (just one) to class. We’ll spend time as a group looking at each student’s top and discussing different options for quilting it. Then, we’ll dive in to the technical side and explore the mechanics of how to actually make those things a reality. (Take note that while we will be looking at quilt tops from each student, students will actually quilt on practice quilt sandwiches.) I’m really looking forward to this class, because I know that we’ll all get a super varied look at different strategies for quilting tops–something that I find to be an incredible creative challenge and skill builder.

Hesperides Shams . Carolyn Friedlander

Finally, on Sunday, Feb 26 is my Fabric And Shape Diversity in Applique With Hesperides class (#132), my last full-day workshop. Like I mentioned in my recent post announcing the pattern, this is a project that I can’t wait to start teaching. It’s one that challenges and entertains me both in its composition, its opportunities to explore applique with different types of fabrics and the technical challenges involved with making the shapes and working with the fabrics. It’s really so much fun! In this class, we’ll be getting fussy with making sharp points in applique–a good challenge whether you’re familiar with the technique or not. And then, we can kick up the challenge (and fun) by using different types of fabrics in the process. Students are encouraged to bring bits and pieces of many types of fabric–lawns to linens. (Yay for variety!) And then to tie everything together, we’ll discuss and play with our composition. I’m excited.

In all of my classes, there is plenty of opportunity to take on additional challenges depending on your level of experience and curiosity. I always anticipate a wide range of experience and interest from my students, which is why it’s always important for my classes to be structured to accommodate that range of needs so that everyone leaves with something. Plus, classes should be fun. That’s the goal.

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Paper-Pieced Quilts Part 1 on Creative Bug

Howdy! Today, the first part of my Paper-Pieced Quilts Class goes live on Creative Bug. (Here’s the link.)

Paper Pieced Quilt Class on Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

I’ve been pretty excited about this class, because the format is a bit longer–it’s a 2-part workalong, with the first part going live today and the next going live in 1 week. What’s cool about that is that I was able to cover more ground.

In the class, we start with designing the block, how to paper piece all of the blocks, assembling the top, quilting it(!) and binding it. It really is about making a quilt start to finish.

Paper Pieced Quilt Class On Creative Bug . Carolyn Friedlander

The finished project is this wall hanging-sized quilt. But of course, it’s super easy to make larger by making more blocks if that’s your thing.

And you might recognize the fabric, it’s all Carkai, which was really fun to plan out.

Oh, and while I’m at it, I thought I’d share some of your work from my other Creative Bug classes (from applique and Polk) that I recently spotted. I’m LOVING what you guys are making!

(@nkroesen) | (@craftsouth)

(@houseonhillroad) | (@a__l)

I hope you find the class super informative and loads of fun. Let me know what you think!

 

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Scrappy Collection and Liberty Aerial Grove Quilts.

Something about the New Year has had a positive influence on getting some WIPs back into rotation. My Scrappy Collection and Liberty Aerial Grove quilts are two of my favorites. Both of these are totally personal projects, meaning they have no deadline and no intended purpose other than for my own pure enjoyment.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

First up is my scrappy collection quilt that I started shortly after this most recent Spring Market in May 2015. (See blog posts here and here.) As predicted in the last post, it had to go into hibernation while I worked on the carkai and fall pattern release. But as soon as all of that and some end-of-year madness was over, my scrappy collection quilt was one of the very first personal projects that I pulled back out. In fact, this is what my New Year’s Day in the studio looked like.

scrappy collection quilt borders. carolyn friedlander

It was a fun day of pull-everything-out-and-throw-it-on-the-floor to decide what to use for borders and what to use for backing. I decided to add enough borders to make it bed sized. To do that, I used more printed fabric from my stash as well as a print from carkai to surround the assembled blocks.

As for the back, I initially hoped my new Widescreen fabrics would be in. The light blue seemed like it’d be perfect for the back. But alas, they weren’t and I didn’t want to wait. With personal projects, it is best to strike when the iron is hot, because you never know what will be needing your attention later. What I ended up with felt pretty exciting. I scrapped it up with some carkai, some doe and a big piece of Kona highlight.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

While making my first Collection quilt, I initially felt the urge to hand quilt it…entirely. Unfortunately timing didn’t allow for that, so it became a hybrid of hand and machine quilting, which I was happy with in the end. With this one, I’ve always figured that I’d hand quilt it, but now that I’ve started, I can’t stop thinking about throwing in some machine work too. We’ll see. I’m open to basing all decisions on what feels right as I go.

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Scrappy Collection Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Liberty Aerial Grove. Also a favorite, and also one that’s been sitting on the shelf. (See previous updates here, here, here and here.)

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This one was started over a year ago. It’s one of the projects in Savor Each Stitch, and something I teach fairly often. In fact, I totally got the idea for this version after one of my students brought Liberty to work on in class. I LOVED the idea, because it seemed like an amazing way to use these beautiful fabrics. Liberty can be an indulgence to partake of at the fabric store, which is why a project that uses small amounts of it can be smart and economical. Plus, the many beautiful small-scale prints work so well in a project like this. Depending on what you decide to do with the background or layout, you will show them right off.

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My backgrounds are a textured mix of chambrays, Essex linen, railroad denims and my printed quilting cottons (architextures, doe). I like how the rich blues set off the pretty prints.

Liberty Aerial Grove quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Originally, I was just going to do as many rows as the project in the book has, but after collecting bits I ended up with enough to make a couple of extra rows. There are 6 rows photographed here, but I just finished appliquéing a 7th. While I wouldn’t be upset about cutting out fabrics for an 8th row, I think it’s time to call this guy done and move on to the borders to finish up the top.

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Best of 2015 + a giveway

It seems like every year goes by in a flash, and 2015 was no exception. While wondering where it all went, I took a look back through my archives to find the best of 2015–an excellent exercise and something I encourage you to do as well, if you haven’t already. There is so much that I forgot happened this year! And although it went by quickly, it still seems strange how much of it seems so far away.

quilt austin house . carolyn friedlander mammoth flannel archer . carolyn friedlander adventures at LACMA adventures at LACMA carolyn friedlander in UPPERCASE carolyn friedlander studio brooklyn tweed boardwalk . carolyn friedlander gingham wiksten tova . carolyn friedlander in the studio for Austin Fox 5 Austin houses class at QuiltCon 2015 . carolyn friedlander carolyn friedlander for patchwork threads linden sweatshirts . carolyn friedlander austin houses quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander outhouse quilt pattern PDF . carolyn friedlander austin house for nichole spring 2015 quilt market . carolyn friedlander handwork is fun . carolyn friedlander spoonflower alder shirt . carolyn friedlander doe coasters . carolyn friedlander the collection quilt . carolyn friedlander a scrappy collection quilt . carolyn friedlander carolyn friedlander in You Inspire Me To Quilt book Doe Wide scout tee . carolyn friedlander Lotta big stitch coasters . carolyn friedlander chambray shorts . carolyn friedlander Handmade Style makeup bag . carolyn friedlander mercer tunics . carolyn friedlander austin houses class at Superbuzzy . carolyn friedlander scrappy poolside tote . carolyn friedlander linen and lawn poolside tote . carolyn friedlander Slow Stitching Retreat in Maine . carolyn friedlander boro . carolyn friedlander ebb quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander everglade quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander envelopes quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander satellite 5 . lynn harris envelopes for elisabeth . carolyn friedlander envelopes signature quilt . carolyn friedlander carkai alturas quilt . carolyn friedlander carkai fabric . carolyn friedlander fall 2015 quilt market . carolyn friedlander scout tee and moji pants . carolyn friedlander everglade pincushions . carolyn friedlander carkai stationery . carolyn friedlander carkai and city cargo duffle . carolyn friedlander carkai crossbody . carolyn friedlander carkai maker tote . carolyn friedlander carkai kiomi top . carolyn friedlander lotta pants . carolyn friedlander carkai fabric . carolyn friedlander

You’ll probably notice a few things that I haven’t shared yet. Keeping up with the sharing may not have been a strength for me in 2015, but I’m hopeful to improve on that in 2016. So stay tuned! I have plenty of stuff to share starting in January.

Otherwise, I really appreciate all of your support this year and want to thank you by doing a giveaway with my 2015 highlights – Austin Houses, The Collection Quilt, Carkai, Envelopes, Ebb and Everglade. To enter, leave a comment below with either enthusiasm for a highlight for you this year and/or something you’re looking forward to in the year ahead. I’ll be picking 6 winners on January 4 at 11am EST. Giveaway now closed. Thank you to all who participated–it was such a pleasure reading your comments!

carolyn friedlander best of 2015


Satellite 5 Quilt by Lynn Harris.

The Satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris is truly a stunner.

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris_

Especially considering how few fabrics went into the making of it.

I challenged Lynn to create a quilt using only the large-scale print from carkai and without even using different colorways to differentiate a motif. (Note: Lynn used two additional colorways in the border and background, but still from the same print! Great, right?!)

As soon as I started to see progress photos, I could barely hold in my excitement. The reason I asked Lynn to work with me on this project was because of the beautifully intricate and interesting fussy-cut EPP she’d been doing on her own. (See here, here, here, here, here…so many good ones!) I was completely fascinated by it and knew Lynn’s vision would be perfect for one way I imagined seeing my newest fabric collection.

making satellite 5 quilt_Lynn Harris

There’s so much you can do with a larger scale print, and I think of this type of project as a way to use it in a small way–one which takes and hones in on a single element of a larger design, extrudes it and pieces it back together in a way that creates something entirely new.

making satellite 5 quilt_Lynn Harris

I love looking at these so much, and I hope to find time to make some of them myself. It looks like a ton of fun and like the type of project that can open your mind up to seeing fabric in a different way.

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris

It was also a treat that Lynn trusted me to quilt it. Quilting for someone else is always something I’ve taken very seriously. It represents a lot of trust, especially on a project like this where Lynn clearly put so much of her thought and time into it. I wanted to make sure my quilting honored and respected that while highlighting what makes the piecing so special.

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris

As for the quilting, I did a mixture of things. First, I started with some basic, big-stitch hand quilting in a complementary color as well as with a little bit of an accent color.

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris

Then I came in with free motion to highlight and further emphasize the beautiful, fussy-cut piecing Lynn created.

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris

Because Lynn is so wonderful, this project is written up as a free pattern available on the Robert Kaufman website (here)–so you can have at it too! I’m pretty excited to see how others interpret this project as well.

Big thank you to Lynn for all of her work on this project. You can find out more about her and her work here and here (Instagram).

satellite 5 quilt by Lynn Harris

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