Tag Archives | savor each stitch

cf Mini QAL #3: Using An Accent.

cf Mini QAL #3: Using An Accent.

How did last week go for you? Did you like the two-tone challenge? I really did. In fact, I kind of like the idea of my project from the week being a jumping off point for a larger quilt.

cf Mini Quilt Along #2 . Carolyn Friedlander

While I was sewing, I realized how fun it would be to treat this mini as one block for a larger project. Can you imagine making more of these in different fabric combinations and then sewing them all together? I really like the idea.

On to the next challenge. Are you ready? This week is all about accents!

Using an accent can be an impactful way to make a statement or to see something in a new way. It can surprise your senses and break expectations. I’ll start with some examples, because it’s a tool that can be utilized in many different ways big and small.

In my original Babson quilt there are many areas of accent, which is a big reason why this pattern can be so much fun to sew.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Depending on how you pair your fabrics within each block, you can highlight–or accent–the variety of shapes in different ways. In mine, I sometimes worked with fabric pairings that were similar in order to create more subtle shape interaction, but I also worked with the opposite–implementing wildly different pairings in order to highlight the shapes at play not only within a block but also in a series of neighboring blocks. You can look at this example as a way of playing with accent without a ton of planning.

+ As a tip, if you’re working this way using a design wall (or the floor, etc) will be a great tool for seeing how your accents are shaping up.

Eads would be another example to check out that uses a similar approach.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

That way of working can be liberating–or overwhelming–depending on how you like to work. There’s no need to stress if that isn’t your thing. Using an accent can also work in ways that are more deliberate. The Emphasis project from my book is a great example of that.

emphasis quilt and sewn stationery_carolyn friedlander

This project uses the exact same block design and the exact same fabrics across 3 samples that are made to look different based on how they are worked. In order to do this, I carefully mapped out each version so that different areas of the design were brought to life and highlighted in each variation. I loved exploring the various possibilities of what to accent.

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

But maybe your first thoughts of using an accent weren’t expressed in either of these examples? I think this third set of examples is maybe the more common ways to think about an accent.

First up is a crowdsourced example from @thirteenquilts.

@thirteenquilts

Brandy is making Babson for the Quilt Along, and those pops of red are very effective accent. Maybe while you’re working you want to spice it up with an accent fabric/color of your choice.

Another example is from when I was developing the Lusk pattern. One of my unfinished samples was based on an idea of using an accent to highlight new shapes in the B version. Similarly here, I have a bright color to pop and a sketch to explore the idea.

cf Mini Quilt Along #3 . Carolyn Friedlander

What do you think? Ready to start using an accent?

Tips:

+ An accent can come from a fabric choice, your fabric placement and/or the quilting itself. Feel free to think about how to incorporate an accent at any/all levels.

+ Sketch it out! Use the coloring pages included in the pattern to figure out what you want to highlight.

+ Sometimes an accent can spice up your project as well as your attitude. Bored of a current combo? Spice it up and stay entertained!

cf mini quilt along . carolyn friedlander

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Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I finished this guy. Finally. And it was fun. Here’s a look at my Aerial Grove in Liberty and chambray that I started a little while ago (107 weeks according to Instagram) … with status updates here, here, here, here and most recently here. Wow. Lots of updates. But I guess that’s what happens when you can take your time with something. That last shot was taken when I finally decided to finish it up, and for good reason, because I was going to give it away.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This pattern is a project from my book and one that I’ve now made several times. This version is full of Liberty prints and lots of chambrays and denims.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

One bonus of not finishing this sooner is that I was able to incorporate some euclid.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is such a play on texture, both in the fabrics and the quilting. Liberty lawn is so fine and soft, which makes it seem almost delicate. And the chambrays and denims have a heavier look and feel, but they’re also soft and very textured. I wanted the quilting to enhance that softness and create even more texture. Plus, since I used big stitch, there’s an added layer of color in the quilting too.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

I even threw in a leftover Hesperides block. The colors, fabrics and shapes worked, and it wasn’t otherwise being used.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

This version is the first that I’ve made with a darker background. (Seen next to my Kona version.)

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back, I went with this lighter blue Widescreen. I like that it adds color, and you’re also able to see the quilting.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : Aerial Grove from Savor Each Stitch

Fabrics : Liberty for the appliqués, denims and chambrays (from Robert Kaufman), euclid, swiss dot chambray, leftover nani iro for the backgrounds, Widescreen for backing.

Aerial Grove in Liberty and Chambray . Carolyn Friedlander

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Facing East Quilt in Euclid.

Here’s a new Facing East Quilt in Euclid.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Even though my new fabric collection Euclid is printed on Essex (and I’ve been making tons of garments and accessories with it), you can still use it (very easily) in quilts…and along with quilting cottons.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

I was very eager to sew up several quilts with the collection, including this version of Facing East in Euclid. This one mixes Euclid with Carkai, as well as some Kona Highlight.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

The palette that I had in mind was black, grey and natural with just the right amount of pop from some gold and bright yellow. The vision made for a very fun and challenging (in the best way) quilt to compile.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

The pattern is from my book, Savor Each Stitch, and it uses both paper piecing and applique techniques. I’ve made this project several times now, and they’ve all been quite different. In this one, it’s scrappy, with the central circles all being the same–a surprising decision to me since I’d been thinking I’d go scrappy with them too. It wasn’t until I was auditioning various circle options that I decided uniformity was the way to go. This happens with me all of the time. I’ll get something in my head about how I’ll finish it, and then when I’m there, I reassess the options and am excited by a new path to take.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

The quilting is super simple. I did some tying with yarn and then a very big, machine-stitched grid. I really like the added texture of the ties and the softness of the minimal quilting. Plus, the wool batting emphasizes all of it.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

On the back is some Doe Wide in black and white. I like that the black connects with the top, while the bright whiteness of it provides a fresh contrast.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Aside from taking this guy to trunk shows with me, it’ll be nice to keep it at home for a bit. It’s adding a mixture of brightness and softness to wherever I decide to leave it.

Facing East Quilt in Euclid . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : Facing East from Savor Each Stitch

Fabric : Euclid, Carkai, Kona Highlight and Doe Wide (for the back)

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