Tag Archives | slow sewing studio

Harriot Pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers.

I’m a big fan of Aneela Hoey’s sewing patterns, and I loved getting a chance to make a couple of Harriot pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers: Pretty Cases, Boxes, Pouches, Pincushions & More–her book.

Harriot Pouches

First up is the See-It-All Pouch. I love this pouch. A friend made me one a while ago, and I always pull for it when packing (and storing) a hand-sewing project. It packs easily into my backpack and holds everything I need.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

The clear vinyl front gives you a great opportunity to show off your project and/or some fabric. In this case, I thought it’d be fun to show off the scallop.

Harriot Pouches

I used the meatier woven for the back, and the stripe for the binding. There’s something fun about bias-striped binding.

Harriot Pouches

It doesn’t take up much space, but I can still pack a block or two, thread, scissors, thread gloss and be ready to sew.

Harriot Pouches

Next up is the Two-In-One Case. This pouch is neat because it folds in half and snaps closed.

Harriot Pouches

When opened, there are two zippered, clear pouches. This makes it easy to see what you have, and it gives you another spot to show off some fabric or whatever you’re working on.

Harriot Pouches

I like the tidy size and have found it to hold just what you need as well. I’d really like to make some for my nephews and niece. I think they’d be great for storing colored pencils, crayons, and lots of their creative goodies too.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

Installing snaps has been hit or miss for me in the past, but lately I’ve been having good success with these plastic ones.

Harriot Pouches

Here are two new pouches in Harriot.

Patterns: See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case, both found in Stitched Sewing Organizers by Aneela Hoey.

Fabric: Harriot

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Circles Quilt In Harriot Fabric.

One of the first things I made for the release was this Circles Quilt in Harriot fabric.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I couldn’t wait to cut up those scallops! They turn into such interesting shapes as both the appliqué and the background. (The green ones above kind of start to look like hair and little faces.)

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

Circles was the very first appliqué pattern in the Slow Sewing Studio. I liked this one being the first because of it being a great starting point for someone new to the technique. The efficiency of shape and process (each cut set of shapes becomes both the circle and the background) make it really approachable. Plus, the versatility of the block makes it fun to explore in all types of colors and fabrics. If you’re looking to try appliqué, it’s a perfect starting point, and if you’re familiar with the technique, it’s still fun too. Plus, the blocks are pretty big. When you have one finished–it’s definitely something to work with!

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is all big-stitch hand quilted with colorful threads. I love bringing that extra texture and color into the project. Plus, the vertical lines on some of the prints are helpful quilting guides.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I hadn’t made a Circles quilt in awhile, and I’m so glad that I found an excuse to make this one.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Circles

fabric(s): Harriot, Essex, Essex Yarn Dyed, Kona Cotton

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

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Hunt Tangerine Quilt

While I was very ready to make my Hunt Harriot Quilt, my Hunt Tangerine quilt was the first Hunt finish and almost as exciting but for very different reasons.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt started out as a bit of a challenge. I wanted to make an entire quilt top with just one fabric from my Harriot collection–background, appliqué and borders.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The scallop design is a 3-for-1 in my mind, and I liked the idea of proving that point with this project. The fabric features one color stripe on one side, another color stripe on the other side and a scallop motif in between. If I could use one side for the background and another side for the appliqué, then just maybe I could use the scallop for a border. The bonus that I discovered is that you can also cut the binding from the same fabric.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Maybe this seems confusing, but it’s pretty straightforward. To make it easy, in the pattern I have a special cutting layout showing exactly what to cut and from where to cut it. If you’re cutting from this same fabric, it’ll be super easy, but I’m hopeful that being able to see the full cutting layout in this way can make it easily adaptable for other special fabrics as well. If you’re feeling excited by something…

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s nice about this direction is how striking it is. I could hardly put the blocks down when working on it, because I couldn’t wait to see the shapes come together. There’s something very special about a two-color quilt. Of course, you could totally pick two different fabrics on your own to get similarly graphic results.

There are other colorways of the scallop that I think would be really cool in this project. But, I’m trying not to think about it…so tempting!

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Hunt Quilt Pattern (wall size, special fabric option)

fabric: Harriot

templates: 1/8″ seam allowance, No seam allowance and sets available to use with this project.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Also of note, I’ve been in an experimental phase with batting. On this quilt I used Quilters Dream Poly, and there’s something really special about its drape and feel. It’s not super lofty, but it’s light and so soft. I only hand quilted it, which makes it even softer, but I’m wondering how it would feel with machine quilting. Either way, I was pleasantly surprised by the results.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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Hunt Harriot Quilt and Hunt Acrylic Templates

I’m finally getting around to sharing more images of some of my newest projects! First up is my Hunt Harriot Quilt.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Have you had a project where you can’t wait to see it come together? My Hunt Harriot Quilt has totally been one of those for me.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I had the design in mind, and when I finally had all of my newest fabrics in hand I couldn’t wait to get everything cut and layed out. I just couldn’t wait to see what it would look like.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The cutting itself was really fun because you can figure out where in the fabric to cut your shapes. Not to play favorites, but the scallop print in the collection was especially enjoyable to strategize over. In cutting from different parts of the scallop or from different sides and colors of the stripe you can get variety not only in color but also in shape. Some of my favorite parts are where there’s a partial scallop. It makes the appliqué look like a totally new shape! What’s also neat is how it can give the appearance of making neighboring shapes join together if that’s something you’re into. (I definitely am.)

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

After cutting the pieces out, the layout itself was another engaging endeavor. I wanted to loosely group things by color and fabric, but I also liked the idea of playing with value (light/dark) and how that makes the shapes blend in and stand out from the background. Of course, I could totally see a project like this taking a very different layout direction with everything mixed up in different ways.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In terms of the appliqué itself, the shapes are really approachable if you’re new to the appliqué game, but still fun if you’re an experienced appliquér. Using wildly different colors can keep it engaging, and the repetition of the same shape also makes it nice for refining how to work with outside curves. This particular shape is great because there’s no extra clipping, which saves you a step as you go along.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

After sampling the pattern, I quickly realized some acrylic templates would make the process much easier. The pattern includes a line drawing of the shape which you can transfer onto template plastic yourself, but for me, I wanted something sturdy and with some reference lines for if/when you want to line something up (like a plaid, etc).

Having the templates manufactured has been a great experience, and I hope anyone using them finds them to be helpful too!

Because there are many ways to appliqué, and because there are many things you can use the templates for, I decided to create a couple of different options. First is the 1/8″ seam allowance option, which is great for using the pattern as written. This version of the template is what I used to make the versions of Hunt that I’ve made so far.

Hunt Quilt 1/8" Seam Allowance Acrylic Template . Carolyn Friedlander

But I know there are about a million ways to appliqué, and so I wanted to offer up an option for those possibilities too. I also have a NO seam allowance option, which is great for any raw-edge, fusible and/or wool appliqué (which I think would be lovely). The NO seam allowance option is also a good one for customizing a seam allowance by way of a seam wheel. Have you used one before? They’re pretty handy. Jen Kingwell has one, and I also found this handy set while doing a bit of research. (PS if you like sewing from Japanese pattern books or any other patterns that don’t include a seam allowance, this new tool set has been a game changer for me.)

Hunt Quilt NO Seam Allowance Acrylic Template . Carolyn Friedlander

I also have been playing around with using the seam-free option for embroidery, and I have goals of using it for a quilting guide too.

And finally, it made sense to me to group these two options into a set. I know that I plan to use both, and I figured others might want to do that as well.

Hunt Quilt Template SET . Carolyn Friedlander

There we go. A new pattern, some new templates and lots of possibilities.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Hunt Quilt Pattern

acrylic template(s): 1/8″ seam allowance, NO seam allowance, and Set options available

fabric(s): My Hunt Harriot Quilt is made with my Harriot fabrics (shipping in March).

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WainwrightAL #6: Finish.

WainwrightAL #6: Finish.

Somehow we’ve made our way to the end–or at least to the end for now.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

I often have mixed feelings at the end of a project. There’s always a part of me that is excited to reach a milestone and to see it finished. And then there can also be the side of me that’s kind of sad to be done with something that has been enjoyable to work on. With my first Wainwright, I definitely felt this mix. I was excited when I had all of my blocks appliquéd and sewn together. I love seeing it for the first time after the basting stitches are gone and after a good press. It always looks so clean!

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

With Wainwright, there was also a little sad part of me, because I had enjoyed working on it so much. Each row brought new colors and different combinations of shapes and fabrics. I loved having an excuse to work on these fun little blocks. Luckily, this is the perfect excuse for more projects, and in this case I was excited to start the quilting.

Originally, I thought I would start off with some big-stitch hand quilting across the entire thing. Then I’d machine stitch on top to add even more texture. I tend to like the softness and color of big stitch, and then the texture and intensity of the machine quilting. But, after finishing the hand quilting, I loved the feel of it as it was.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus, the color effect is pretty nice–although not easy to see in the photographs. I big stitched along all of the diagonals using different colors of thread that generally related to the colors in the blocks. I liked having a loose transition of color across the quilt with the fabrics, and doing the same with the quilting threads adds another layer to that transition.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

I tried out a new batting with this quilt. Quilters Dream has 4 different loft options in cotton, and this uses their heaviest (“supreme”). I’ve tried it on a few projects since this one, and I’ll admit that it’s maybe not my favorite, but in the case of this quilt, there is something nice about it after being hand quilted. It’s weighty but still soft.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now, let’s go back to my project for this QAL. Here’s where I’m at.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn FriedlanderWhen I initially thought about my QAL project, I knew that I wanted to try something a little bit different. I wanted to push myself a little in terms of the palette. I don’t typically work with a super dark, tone-on-tone palette, and I was curious to see how something like that could work out.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

In doing this, it’s been a great exploration in texture, which I’m always a fan of. Handwork is the perfect way to feel out different types of fabrics, and that’s very much the case here. I have linen, sateen, quilting cotton and poplin. While it may not photograph spectacularly, in person you can see how the light plays differently on each of the fabrics. I can’t wait to get them all appliquéd, because I think the quilting will be really fun and can highlight the differences even more.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

While my initial fabric pull included blacks and a range of greys, I’m now thinking I’ll separate the darkest from the lightest into separate final projects. For awhile I thought I’d make a pair of pillow shams, but now I’m thinking that I’ll do a pillow sham with the darkest stuff, and then a wall hanging–or something larger with the lighter stuff.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

While cutting out the latest few blocks, I found myself wanting to make more and more pairings of the lighter guys.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

And so, I think that’s what I’ll do!

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

For me this QAL was a great excuse to start another handwork project (like I ever need an excuse for that, ha!), to work with a new palette that I was curious about, to give myself a little something to relax with at the end of the day, AND to work along with you while doing it. If you followed along with the Eads QAL, you will have noticed that my goals were a bit different. For Eads, I had a goal to have a quilt top finished by the end of 12 weeks–and I’m SO glad that I did. That was a wonderful goal for that project, but in this case, I didn’t feel the same goal was necessary.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

Having said that, I do like having goals and re-assessing progress where necessary. And so, I think that now that I have a better idea of what I want this project to shape up to be, and since we’re at a great point of assessment, I’m marking my calendar for a month from now to check back in with you on where I’m at with this guy. Goals are good, and I don’t want this guy to get lost.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ Appliqué is actually really strong. I’ve appliquéd plenty of tote bags and other items that get used and abused, and I am happy to report that my appliqués have remained in place! Of course, if you’re new to the technique and feeling unsure about the strength, you can always take it into consideration when planning your quilting. Feel free to quilt over any areas that cause concern, and you’ll be good to go!

+ Maybe you took on more of a project than you wanted? This isn’t a bad thing, in fact I think it’s great to be excited about a project. There’s nothing wrong with making changes down the road if you decide that a smaller project is better. I personally love making smaller things like pillow shams and tote bags because you really use them. In my case, I think I’m going the opposite way–having initially thought pillow shams, and now thinking that maybe a little something larger could be good. Either way, do what feels best for you!

+ I talked about how I wanted to use this project to push myself a bit. Sometimes I really like a challenge, but it’s always a balance. When I teach, I sometimes see people feeling like they have to push themselves, because they feel like it needs to be hard in order to learn. It totally doesn’t! I’m definitely a fan of doing whatever works for you and whatever feels right. If you’re feeling good in your comfort zone, go for it, or if you’re feeling good about giving yourself a nudge, go for that too!

I really appreciate you following along whether in spirit or in actuality! Seeing projects popping up in my feed makes me so excited and eager to sew.

carolyn friedlander project bag

As a thank you, I want to do a giveaway. I recently made up some project bags–with a Wainwright theme–that I sold at QuiltCon. I secretly saved a few, including 1 to giveaway at the end of this QAL. The rest will go up for sale in my shop on Tuesday at 10am EST.

To enter the giveaway, share with me your thoughts on this QAL or a thought on a recent project that you’ve been excited about by leaving a comment here before Monday, March 26 at 10am EST.

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WainwrightAL #5: Your Projects.

WainwrightAL #5: Your Projects.

Sometimes it’s good to take a step back from your own project and change the scenery! This is why I thought it’d be fun to see what others are working on. You guys are rocking this!

@andrea_nham

@andrea_nham with a really nice blue, green, grey and yellow thing happening. Bonus points for having a matching pouch!

@ayragon

@ayragon has loads of big blocks underway. There’s something nice about being able to see more of the prints at play in the larger format.

@bkimmerly

Speaking of prints…@bekimmerly is making good use of some fun prints. I like how she’s positioned the trees so nicely inside the shapes. Way to work the prints!

@blueskycrafter

@blueskycrafter just made it to a layout stage, and I know she must be satisfied to see everything all together. Even though it’s not my project, I’m feeling super satisfied for her–it’s looking great!

@brakmack1997

@brakmack1997 is really working the 2-color combo. I love how visually enticing it is to use just 2 fabrics. It’s such a fun play with the shapes.

@court9702

@court9702 is using lots of dots and stripes. It’s wonderful! I love how something like this can be completely timeless.

@nies_co_creations

Using all solids results in a totally different look. @nies_co_creations is using just the right mix of blues, it’s lovely to look at.

As for me, I’ll give you a good flashback to my first version.

Carolyn Friedlander . Wainwright Quilt

I stared at this thing SO much. Not only while cutting out each block, but also after each appliquéd row, I’d stand back and assess how it was looking. I might move one block here, another one there…maybe I’d swap out an appliqué or background each time… I love this way of working. You can see some of my extra pieces toward the bottom. I kept plenty of options open.

Tips:

+ Taking a step back can be great. It allows you some space to think of other things, which often brings a freshness back to your project.

+ Swap out your needle! It’s pretty amazing how you start to wear them down. Now that you’ve been sewing along, I’m sure you’re starting to pick up on the subtleties of everything you’re working with. Freshen that needle, and you’ll be amazed how much it will freshen your stitches.

+ You all gave me some watching recs, and here’s one that I’ve recently enjoyed. If you like houses in amazing locations, I just watched The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes on Netflix. Each episode is grouped by location–mountain, coast, etc, and they span locations all over the world. I like how beautiful the homes and locations are, as well as how they talk about building challenges, design advantages, and other stuff. Plus, one of the hosts is an architect and he does some pretty fun sketches on site to highlight aspects of the projects. It’s definitely a beautiful watch!

If you’re just now joining in and looking for a copy of the pattern, here’s a link to the digital version in my shop.

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WainwrightAL #4: Appliqué Progress.

WainwrightAL #4: Appliqué Progress.

Now that I’ve been spending a little bit of time with my blocks basting and appliquéing them, I’m finding myself thinking about all kinds of project variations. Do you do this too?

There’s something about thinking about and discovering new ideas when working on a project, which is probably why I like sewing so much. It gets my mind going.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

This week specifically, I’ve been thinking about grouping my blocks and fabrics more tonally. Instead of having a lot of contrast within each block, I kind of like the idea of keeping things fairly similar. I reorganized my pairings to do this a bit.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

Nothing is set in stone yet, but I am leaning towards making a pair of pillow shams at the end of this, and I kind of think it would be cool if they were split up by color. Maybe one has the darker blocks and the other has the lighter ones? OR, I could arrange them another way. For now, it’s fun to continue making blocks and dreaming about all the ways to put them together.

Have your projects been giving you ideas?

Tips:

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

+ Now that I’ve started appliquéing, I thought of another tip to share. You’ll notice in the pic above that I’ve basted all the way around the block. I like doing this because it allows you to baste continuously, and it holds the appliqué fabric to the background so nicely. You don’t actually need to appliqué those outer edges, but I like leaving the basting threads in place because they can hold all of your layers together until you end up sewing your blocks together.

+ Get cozy! Don’t be uncomfortable when doing handwork. I’m always positioning myself in the right chair, with the right foot stool, pillow, etc. so that I’m comfortable when I’m working. It’s never good to feel achy and sore! Make sure to get up and stretch out, move around often. I easily get locked into my project, so I have to remind myself to do this. Having plenty of tea/your favorite beverage on hand can force this. 🙂

+ Sidle up with friends or a good show/movie. Since I’m currently in between having a good show to watch, I’d love to hear some tips from you on something good to watch!

+ Inner points can be tricky, but they do get better with practice! In WainwrightAL #2, the last tip speaks to this. You can always head back over to check it out.

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WainwrightAL #3: Basting Progress.

WainwrightAL #3: Basting Progress.

While away from home, I’ve been basting away on my Wainwright–yay for portability!

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

The cool thing about it being basted is that it’s ready to go anywhere.

Last week I mentioned my palette for this QAL project, but here’s a better look. I’m using mostly greys and darker fabrics. I have added in some Kona solids, but I also have fabric from my botanics, euclid and gleaned collections as well as a print from Erin Dollar’s Arroyo collection. As I go, I might decide to add and/or subtract. That’s the beauty of it–you can see how things are looking and make adjustments as needed.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

A note about cutting and arranging your pieces and templates. As noted in the pattern and in Week 1, the fabric ratio to keep in mind is that 1 square of appliqué fabric can yield 2 blocks. This means you’ll want to set aside 2 background blocks for each set of appliqué shapes that you cut. Personally, I find it helpful to grab 2 background fabrics when I grab 1 appliqué fabric to take to the ironing board to fold and press at the same time. This way I know I’m keeping my ratio in check. Of course, if I decide a background isn’t working, I may prep an extra or two later, but in general, I think this is a good way to start.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

If you take a look at the cutting template, there are 3 (solid) cutting lines, and (dashed) lines to show how to align the template to your block. Make sure to align along folds and raw edges as noted. Once you cut the appliqué (your top shape) along the cutting lines, you will have 3 sections (that nest) to place onto your backgrounds. Take note that the small circular corner pieces don’t need to be used. They’re tiny.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

The great thing about this stage is that you can really see how things will shape up. I like to cut things up and lay them out as I go so I can see how my fabric choices and shape mixing is working out. We have an 1/8″ seam allowance, so just keep in mind that there will be a little more space around your shapes as you stitch them down. For example, the black appliqué in the above photo (bottom, left) is actually 2 shapes with a cut line separating them–although it looks like one right now. The shapes match up before being stitched, but a gap between them will appear after each side is appliquéd. You can see this a bit better in my first version (below). The first few rows have already been appliquéd, and so you can see that gap appearing between the neighboring shapes.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

Work in the way that feels good to you! For me, I like cutting and laying things out so I have a good idea, but if you prefer to cut and arrange in smaller sections, by all means do it! This is the beauty of appliqué, you can see how something is coming along before even sewing it together. You can see that I haven’t pinned anything down yet. Since I’m auditioning different shapes and fabric combinations, I keep things loose. Once I decide I like a combination, I pin them down with the appliqué pins, and then do my basting.

Wainwright QAL . Carolyn Friedlander

If you want to join in and need a copy of the pattern, you can find it here.

Otherwise, you are all posting some beautiful starts!

Tips:

+ Sometimes using a longer needle works well for basting. Because of basting not needing to be a super-short stitch, the longer needle can help you stitch along more quickly and easily.

+ Machine baste or hand baste? Both work, but I’m personally more of a fan of hand basting for a few reasons. One, it’s portable. Two, once you get comfortable doing it, I find it to be faster and much easier than navigating tricky shapes on the machine. Three, it’s more gentle on the fabric. If you are machine basting, make sure to use a fresh (sharp) needle. Four, hand basting is way easier to remove than machine basting.

+ Using a fun basting thread is just that–fun! I pretty much always use my Aurifil 1104 for basting–except for when my fabrics match 1104–which happens! I do love that color.

+ Basting stitches are temporary, so you do not need to knot them. Leave thread tails loose and on the top side of your work. This way you know exactly where they are when you’re doing your appliqué stitches later.

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Quick Thread Catcher Tutorial.

quick thread catcher tutorial . carolyn friedlander

Yesterday I mentioned that I liked traveling with a little thread catcher, and so today I’m posting a quick thread catcher tutorial. This is based on one given to me by the sweet owners of the Janie Lou quilt shop in St Louis, Missouri. What I really like about it is that it folds up nice and flat, which makes it easy to bring with me anywhere. Plus, it’s silly how quick and easy it is to put together. I’ll be making many more of these for my sewing buds…

Materials: *NOTE, Mini size is listed in update below.

+ Exterior Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ Lining Fabric – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

+ (optional) Interfacing – cut to 8 1/2″ x 17 1/2″ applied to Exterior.

Fabric/Interfacing Note: Neither of the thread catchers shown in this tutorial are interfaced. The one that I was given (above) has a sturdier canvas on the exterior. It’s nice. The one (outlined below) in this tutorial is made from un-interfaced quilting cotton for both the exterior and lining. I was mostly curious to see how it would turn out, and it’s surprisingly structured! I’m very pleased with it and will totally do it this way again. But of course, if you like interfacing, you can always incorporate it into your project.

All seam allowances are 1/4″. While I’m using my serger in this tutorial, you can just as well use your sewing machine. All raw edges will be enclosed, except where noted below.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold in half (RIGHT sides TOGETHER) so that short edges are aligned. In the photo below, my short sides are at the top, and the fold is on the bottom. Do this and the following for both the exterior and lining panels.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Pin (if desired) and stitch along the sides.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Create a boxed corner by pinching side seam to bottom fold on each side.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Mark a line 1 3/4″ from pointed edge. Stitch along this line.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Turn exterior (RIGHT side OUT).

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Place lining inside exterior, aligning side seams. Pin in place (if desired). Tip: Alternate the direction of the side seams when you match them up. This will make things less-bulky.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Stitch along top edge. A serger will finish this edge as you stitch, but if you’re using a sewing machine, you can use a zigzag stitch to finish it. Or, if you want to bind it, you can totally do that too, but since the top is folded, it isn’t super critical.

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Fold the top down a couple of times, and you’re good to go!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

I hope you enjoy yours as much as I’ve enjoyed mine!

Thread Catcher Tutorial . Carolyn Friedlander

Dec 21, 2018 UPDATE – In my newsletter I outlined how to make a mini thread catcher, and so I thought I’d update the directions here as well. If you’d like to make a little mini, follow directions above but cut your Exterior and Lining fabrics to 4 1/2″ x 12″. Mark your boxed corner 1″ from point. There you have it!

Mini and Regular Thread Catcher . Carolyn Friedlander

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WainwrightAL #2: Tool Updates and Travel.

WainwrightAL #2: Tool Updates and Travel.

appliqué supplies . carolyn friedlander

We’re moving along with week two! I’m seeing some great starts from many of you on instagram, and I’m moving along (quite literally) at QuiltCon in Pasadena. Since this is a traveling week for me and because handwork is super portable, I thought it’d be fun to put a slight travel twist on things. In addition to going over some of my favorite appliqué supplies, I’ll be making note of some of my favorite travel-friendly tips as well!

It’s been a little while since I’ve updated my appliqué tools-of-the-trade post, and really, not much has changed. Those are all still my favorite things, but I do have some updates to add in to the mix.

wainwright quilt appliqué supplies . carolyn friedlander

First, clover clips! With many of my appliqué designs being folded and cut multiple layers at a time, these little clips are super handy for holding everything together. There’s even a new set with a thinner profile, which is just perfect.

I also have an update with the thread conditioner. I’ve always liked it, but I’ve recently decided that it makes a bigger difference than I was maybe willing to admit. Full disclosure, I’d mostly gotten lazy and wasn’t using it as much in recent years. I always would have it with me, and I’d use it occasionally, but I’d generally just fallen out of the habit of using it. It’s an extra step–not a hard step, at all–but definitely a step that is easy to skip when you’re wanting to cruise through a project. When I was making my first Wainwright, I was having issues and decided to give it a try. Immediately I noticed a huge difference. It’s not that I didn’t notice a difference before, but I think that because I basically made Wainwright in a straight-shot marathon, it was much more noticeable how much of a difference it made. It makes it glide through the fabric much more easily. Without it, the thread feels like it’s dragging, not in a super obvious way, but definitely in an obvious way if you’re really in tune to the process.

wainwright quilt appliqué supplies . carolyn friedlander

Another big update is thread! Since my last appliqué supply post, some magical thread things have happened. Aurifil released their 80wt cotton thread, and it is my FAVORITE thread to use for hand appliqué. I still use their 50wt cotton to baste, but 80wt is the only thing I use for the appliqué itself.

wainwright quilt appliqué supplies . carolyn friedlander

And, I’m delighted to have my own appliqué thread set which I put together to cover pretty much all of the major colors you’ll need–or that was my goal anyway. (And I have some in the shop now too.)

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

One more new discovery that isn’t pictured is my new Daylight Slimline light. I’ll have to take some good pics once I get my handwork set-up back in order. I started seeing these lights at QuiltCon last year, and I was very intrigued. Unlike most of the sewing lights, they look really sleek. Plus they offer a wide bar of light that you can adjust in all kinds of ways. Eventually, I picked one up, and it sat in the box while I was making my first Wainwright. About halfway in, I realized that I wasn’t seeing things well, and so I opened the box and was immediately kicking myself for not having done so sooner. It is a game changer. It perfectly lit up my project and was easy to orient so that there were no shadows on my work–which was the issue I’d been having with my other lights. Now, I’m a massive convert. It’s worth the investment.

appliqué supplies . carolyn friedlander

To recap, you can read this post about my favorite appliqué supplies here while keeping in mind the updates mentioned above.

+ Thread for project (such as Aurifil Cotton 50wt for basting and Aurifil Cotton 80wt for appliqué)

+ Appliqué needles (such as Clover Gold Eye Appliqué Needles No. 10)

+ Appliqué pins (such as Clover Appliqué Size 12)

+ Large fabric scissors (such as Kai 7230 9″ tailoring shears, or these other favorites)

+ Small fabric scissors (such as Kai N5100 4″ scissors)

+ Removable marking tool (such as Pilot Frixion pen–always test on fabric before using)

+ Seam gauge (such as Dritz Measuring Gauge)

+ Iron

+ Heavy paper or template plastic (for copying template)

+ Thread Conditioner (such as Thread Heaven or beeswax)

Optional supplies: Thimble (I like the adhesive leather pads), needle threader

Finally, here’s a look at the fabrics that I’ve pulled…

carolyn friedlander wainwright quilt along

I’m wanting to go grey…so we’ll see! I think I’ll probably add in some solids too. Maybe.

carolyn friedlander wainwright quilt along

Tips:

+ Fabric tip – Solids vs Prints in appliqué: In general, solids hide less and prints hide more. If you’re new to appliqué, using a print–even a subtle one–can be a little more forgiving than a solid. Of course, if you’re most excited about solids and you’re a newbie, don’t let me stop you!

+ I always travel with my Nest Egg tote, the very first one I made in fact. It’s still going strong, and I really like how I can zip it up and throw it into my backpack. While on the plane, I take it out, and open it up on my tray table and work away.

nest egg tote and supplies . carolyn friedlander

+ Also handy when traveling is a fold-up thread catcher. The one I use was a gift, but I put together a quick tutorial for you that will be coming out tomorrow. Stay tuned…

nest egg tote and supplies . carolyn friedlander

+ The Aurifil smaller spools are my preferred travel-handwork thread, and the smaller version of the Petal Pouch by Noodlehead fits them perfectly.

Carolyn Friedlander Aurifil 80wt Thread Appliqué

+ This tip skips ahead a little bit, but I know that many of you have already started your appliquéing, and so I hope it will be helpful. Inner points in appliqué can be tricky to turn when you’re just starting out. This is easily the step/shape I demonstrate most in workshops, and while it is helpful to see it in action, it’s also a case of practice really being the key to making it easier. I promise! This is also why I like designs like this, because they can give you great practice in tackling such shapes. After doing several of these, you’ll no doubt see improvement. It is helpful to see this step in action, and so I’ll highlight my Appliqué Quilt Top class on Creative Bug–which you can find here. This block has many tricky inner points, which makes it a great one to watch for seeing how to do it. Hope that helps!

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WainwrightAL #1: The Pattern and The Plan.

WainwrightAL #1: The Pattern and The Plan.

To kick things off, I thought it would be appropriate to talk a bit more about the pattern, and then my plan for moving forward with my own project as well as in general. Plans are good, being excited about them might be better.

First, the pattern. Wainwright was inspired by and named after the Wainwright building in St Louis. If you’ve seen it or other Louis Sullivan buildings, you know that the ornamentation is incredible. There are so many beautiful motifs, and it was easy to become very inspired.

Wainwright Building . St Louis, Missouri

As a quilt, I love appliqué patterns that offer a lot of design possibilities, are fun to sew (because you’ll be getting right in there with it), and can be easy to travel with. With this one, I went for all of that by taking one basic motif and breaking it up in a way that could be mixed and matched among the blocks and with few or many fabrics.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Appliqué projects are always great for finding new color and fabric combinations, because once you cut out the shapes and layer them on a background, you can actually see what it’s basically going to look like. How cool is that? If you aren’t liking it, you can easily make a change by swapping out the background or by changing the appliqué (the top layer, or the shape). This is probably why I always have SO many appliqué projects cut out–because it’s way too tempting to cut them out to see what an idea will look like.

With this first version, I was most excited about using my new Gleaned collection and its coordinates. I used pieces from all of it.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

gleaned fabric architextures coordinates . Carolyn Friedlander

Appliqué projects can be great for fussy cutting motifs and making use of special stuff–like the special selvage treatment in some of my newest prints from Gleaned. You can see snippets of this stuff in many of my blocks.

gleaned fabric collection . Carolyn Friedlander

If you’re planning to take advantage of this, just make sure to position any special motifs where you want them in the squares that you’ll be cutting out. Both the background and appliqué pieces are cut from regular squares, so you can use the shape and size of the square to get your fabric positioned how you want it. Just keep in mind your 1/4″ seam allowances for sewing the blocks together and the 1/8″ seam allowances for appliqué (which yes, is plenty of seam allowance).

Back to the project.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There are two block sizes to this project–small and big. This first version uses only small blocks.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The small blocks are nice for a few reasons. First, you will need more of them, which means you can incorporate more fabric combinations and pairings. Second, smaller-sized blocks are pretty easy to handle and relatively speedier than larger ones.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The pattern also includes a larger-block option, which is what I incorporated into the second version that I made.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In this version, you can see how the sizes compare, because I used them together. I sized the blocks specifically to work this way, but of course, you can use them however you’d like! Just how my first version uses all small blocks, you can totally make a version with all big blocks. Or, you can mix them up. The possibilities are yours.

Big blocks are great because fewer of them make a larger project. They can also be a better format if you’re working with a larger print, and expanded shapes mean everything is extruded and therefore slightly easier technically if you’re just getting into the technique. If you’re curious, try one of each, and see what you think.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ll also notice that in this version I took a totally different route with the fabric. Instead of using tons of different fabrics, I used only two–this from Gleaned and this coordinate. The cool thing about this approach is that it really emphasizes the variety of shapes and sizes in the design.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The main thing that you can keep in mind with regard to either option is that the pieces cut from 1 appliqué square can be used for 2 blocks. Split them up and mix them about as you wish!

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Now that you’ve seen my two versions, I hope that you’re excited to start mapping out your own! As for me, I’m planning to use small blocks in my next version–I love this size. To be totally upfront, I’m not entirely sure what final size (or even project type) that I am going for. I might make a pair of pillow shams…or I might do a wall hanging…I don’t know. I’m leaving that decision for later since I know I can adjust things as I go. I do have some fabrics pulled, but I think I’ll save that for next week.

Finally, I don’t want anyone stressing over this project. Handwork is usually my way to relax, and so I want this WainwrightAL to foster that same mood for you. Personally, I really liked the idea of using this QAL as a way to have an enjoyable something to work on in the background of my own life, and I hope that you find it fitting nicely into your life as well. Let’s use this time together to have fun, to enjoy each other and to enjoy playing with our fabric.

If you still need a copy of the pattern, you can find one here or checking with your local shop or favorite online retailer.

Wainwright quilt in Gleaned Fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Tips:

+ The project layout pages can totally be used as coloring pages. Either make copies as needed, OR use tracing paper over the top of them (since the layouts are already shaded) to explore your color/fabric ideas!

+ If you’re stalling out over fabric/color ideas, I always just go with my gut. Pulling fabric for a new project is massively exciting, but it can easily get out of control and lead to project paralysis. Instead of getting overwhelmed, take a step back and think about what’s most exciting to you. Start there, you can always make changes and adapt as you move along.

+ If you’re new to appliqué, not to worry! It’s fun and shouldn’t be intimidating. Everything gets easier with practice, especially this. This project is also perfect for anyone just getting started. I won’t be going over the exact technique since it’s outlined in the pattern, but I do have some classes on Creative Bug that fully walk you through the process. Here’s a link to my classes on Creative Bug.

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Wainwright Quilt Along Announcement.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Hi, hi! Are you in the mood for some handwork? I am, or maybe it’s safe to say that I pretty much am always in the mood. It’s relaxing…and fun…and portable.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

While I love handwork, I know that many of you love handwork too. I also know that many of you are curious about handwork, and so I’ve been thinking that a Wainwright Quilt Along could help get us all going. After doing the Eads QAL last year, I knew that I wanted to plan more QAL adventures for this year. I’m happy to announce that the Wainwright Quilt Along will be up first!

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My new pattern Wainwright was a lot of fun to put together. It’s about playing with color, shape and all kinds of possibilities. Each of the appliqué shapes can be shared and mixed between blocks. Plus, there are two different block sizes, which means you can pick one or the other (big or small) OR you can mix and match them both, because I deliberately sized them to work together. I always think that the more possibilities in a project, the better. No worries if any of that sounds daunting! We’ll cover it in the coming weeks, for sure.

Wainwright Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Next week (February 15) will be the start of the Wainwright Quilt Along, and I have 6 weeks planned, with a wrap up on March 22. My plan isn’t necessarily to have a finished top by the end of 6 weeks–although that could totally be your goal!–but instead, I’m thinking of using 6 weeks to get some blocks rolling, talk about handwork, and just generally participate with you in some hand sewing. Whether you’re in the midst of winter (my fellow Northern Hemisphere folks!) and trapped indoors, or if summer is upon you (hi, Southern Hemisphere-ies!) and you’re looking for projects to travel around with, handwork is always handy, and I hope that this will be a delight to add into your schedule.

Wainwright Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

You can grab a copy of the pattern here, or at stores (that’s just a link to a google search, but you could also ask your local shop!).

You in?

Wainwright Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

Let’s go!

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