Tag Archives | slow sewing studio

Harriot Pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers.

I’m a big fan of Aneela Hoey’s sewing patterns, and I loved getting a chance to make a couple of Harriot pouches from Stitched Sewing Organizers: Pretty Cases, Boxes, Pouches, Pincushions & More–her book.

Harriot Pouches

First up is the See-It-All Pouch. I love this pouch. A friend made me one a while ago, and I always pull for it when packing (and storing) a hand-sewing project. It packs easily into my backpack and holds everything I need.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

The clear vinyl front gives you a great opportunity to show off your project and/or some fabric. In this case, I thought it’d be fun to show off the scallop.

Harriot Pouches

I used the meatier woven for the back, and the stripe for the binding. There’s something fun about bias-striped binding.

Harriot Pouches

It doesn’t take up much space, but I can still pack a block or two, thread, scissors, thread gloss and be ready to sew.

Harriot Pouches

Next up is the Two-In-One Case. This pouch is neat because it folds in half and snaps closed.

Harriot Pouches

When opened, there are two zippered, clear pouches. This makes it easy to see what you have, and it gives you another spot to show off some fabric or whatever you’re working on.

Harriot Pouches

I like the tidy size and have found it to hold just what you need as well. I’d really like to make some for my nephews and niece. I think they’d be great for storing colored pencils, crayons, and lots of their creative goodies too.

Harriot Pouches

Harriot Pouches

Installing snaps has been hit or miss for me in the past, but lately I’ve been having good success with these plastic ones.

Harriot Pouches

Here are two new pouches in Harriot.

Patterns: See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case, both found in Stitched Sewing Organizers by Aneela Hoey.

Fabric: Harriot

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Circles Quilt In Harriot Fabric.

One of the first things I made for the release was this Circles Quilt in Harriot fabric.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I couldn’t wait to cut up those scallops! They turn into such interesting shapes as both the appliqué and the background. (The green ones above kind of start to look like hair and little faces.)

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

Circles was the very first appliqué pattern in the Slow Sewing Studio. I liked this one being the first because of it being a great starting point for someone new to the technique. The efficiency of shape and process (each cut set of shapes becomes both the circle and the background) make it really approachable. Plus, the versatility of the block makes it fun to explore in all types of colors and fabrics. If you’re looking to try appliqué, it’s a perfect starting point, and if you’re familiar with the technique, it’s still fun too. Plus, the blocks are pretty big. When you have one finished–it’s definitely something to work with!

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt is all big-stitch hand quilted with colorful threads. I love bringing that extra texture and color into the project. Plus, the vertical lines on some of the prints are helpful quilting guides.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

I hadn’t made a Circles quilt in awhile, and I’m so glad that I found an excuse to make this one.

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Circles

fabric(s): Harriot, Essex, Essex Yarn Dyed, Kona Cotton

Circles Quilt In Harriot . Carolyn Friedlander

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Hunt Tangerine Quilt

While I was very ready to make my Hunt Harriot Quilt, my Hunt Tangerine quilt was the first Hunt finish and almost as exciting but for very different reasons.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt started out as a bit of a challenge. I wanted to make an entire quilt top with just one fabric from my Harriot collection–background, appliqué and borders.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The scallop design is a 3-for-1 in my mind, and I liked the idea of proving that point with this project. The fabric features one color stripe on one side, another color stripe on the other side and a scallop motif in between. If I could use one side for the background and another side for the appliqué, then just maybe I could use the scallop for a border. The bonus that I discovered is that you can also cut the binding from the same fabric.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Maybe this seems confusing, but it’s pretty straightforward. To make it easy, in the pattern I have a special cutting layout showing exactly what to cut and from where to cut it. If you’re cutting from this same fabric, it’ll be super easy, but I’m hopeful that being able to see the full cutting layout in this way can make it easily adaptable for other special fabrics as well. If you’re feeling excited by something…

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s nice about this direction is how striking it is. I could hardly put the blocks down when working on it, because I couldn’t wait to see the shapes come together. There’s something very special about a two-color quilt. Of course, you could totally pick two different fabrics on your own to get similarly graphic results.

There are other colorways of the scallop that I think would be really cool in this project. But, I’m trying not to think about it…so tempting!

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

pattern: Hunt Quilt Pattern (wall size, special fabric option)

fabric: Harriot

templates: 1/8″ seam allowance, No seam allowance and sets available to use with this project.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Also of note, I’ve been in an experimental phase with batting. On this quilt I used Quilters Dream Poly, and there’s something really special about its drape and feel. It’s not super lofty, but it’s light and so soft. I only hand quilted it, which makes it even softer, but I’m wondering how it would feel with machine quilting. Either way, I was pleasantly surprised by the results.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

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