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New Sew Fine Thread Gloss Scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal.

New Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal.

Looking for a handwork refresh? I’m delighted to share new Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal! As with any of the scents that I’ve collaborated with Sew Fine to bring to you, I’ve personally spent a lot of time working with each of these new scents over the last several months. I find each to be delightful in their own way, and I hope that they strike a chord similarly with you too.

Let’s meet the new scents!

Sew Fine Thread Gloss in Yuzu

Yuzu

Yuzu is a slightly tart, slightly sweet, citrusy scent that is both fresh and light. It is easy to like and very uplifting. To me there’s nothing more refreshing than citrusy smells. This one has its own special twist that I think is just right.

Sew Fine Thread Gloss in Yuzu
Orange Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom is a scent very near and dear to my heart. I’ve spent a good majority of my life around orange trees, and the smell of the blossoms in the spring is like nothing else! It’s such a distinct scent, and this one captures it like few things do. Orange Blossom doesn’t really smell like oranges, to me it’s highly floral, only slightly citrusy and very fresh.

Orange Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss
Petal Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Petal

Petal is a floral scent that has the feel to me of getting dressed up. It is a lush blend of orchid and osmanthus with warm hints of bergamot, sandalwood and musk.

Petal Sew Fine Thread Gloss

Each of these new scents are available now in the shop. If you aren’t looking for something scented, you can always go the Natural route.

Want to know more about thread gloss?

I love using thread gloss, because it strengthens my threads and makes handwork an easier and more enjoyable experience. For the record, I never thought I’d like using scented gloss, but it turns out I totally love it. The scents are all light enough to not be overpowering or stay with you or your project too long, but they are present enough to bring a special, enjoyable comfort to the sewing experience. I’m a big fan.

I’ll link a few relevant posts below if you’d like to find out more.

+ Why I love collaborating with Sew Fine.

+ Thread Tips and Tricks

+ Needle-turn Appliqué tools

+ Thread Gloss in the shop

New Sew Fine Thread Gloss scents in Yuzu, Orange Blossom and Petal

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New Scents with Sew Fine Thread Gloss.

Have you enjoyed using thread gloss as much as I have? Never in a million years would I have imagined how much I’d appreciate using a lightly-scented thread gloss in my projects. Since Sew Fine Thread Gloss and I announced our first collaboration, I knew I wanted to work together on more. I continue to love the product, and I’ve found myself preferring different scents at different times. I don’t know if it has to do with the change of a seasons, the change of a project or what else, but I’m delighted to announce our three new scents!

Each of these scents have carried me through many different projects over the last year or so, and I hope you find enjoyment and helpfulness from them too!

Lemongrass and Leaf Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

First up is Lemongrass and Leaf, a soothing mix of lemongrass, green tea and white ginger. It is both earthy and bright.

Lemongrass and Leaf Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Surely it’s the fact that I grew up around citrus, but the next scent, Lemon Verbena, is also a favorite. It takes citrus notes in a slightly different direction.

Lemon Verbena Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

It is lemony, herbaceous and very fresh.

Lemon Verbena Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

Last up is a warmer scent, Golden Blossom.

Golden Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m not usually a warmer-scent person, but this one connected with me from the beginning. It mixes golden amber, bergamot and just a hint of sweetness. It has a comforting feel that I like.

Golden Blossom Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

If additional scents aren’t your thing, which I totally understand, the shop is fully restocked on Natural. It’ll strengthen your threads just as well as the others.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

You can find all of the newest scents in the shop here, the background on why I prefer using this thread conditioner and some other thread tips and tricks here.

Happy stitching!

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Thread Tips and Tricks.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

With the launch of my recent collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss, I thought it might be handy to throw some thread tips into a blog post. There are some super easy things that can make a huge difference.

  1. Work the thread in the proper direction, which is the direction that it is spun. Doing so will result in fewer knots. This might sound tricky and overly technical, BUT it’s super easy in practice and can just be a matter of creating a new habit. Here’s what you need to do; if you’re right-handed, knot the end of thread that you cut, and if you’re left-handed, knot the first end off the spool (or NOT the end that you cut). Keep in mind that this trick works with factory-wound spools and not any bobbins that you have wound yourself (because they’ve been re-wound in the opposite direction).
  2. How’s that thread length? If you’re having problems with knots, and you’ve already adjusted your knotting routine (see #1), then you might consider cutting a shorter length of thread. A shorter length might also be needed if your threads are starting to shred or thin out in the middle while you work. There’s always a balance between getting the maximum length of thread so that you’re not stopping and starting unnecessarily, BUT not too long that it’s wearing out the thread or getting knotty from all of the wear and excess length. Handwork is easily adaptable thanks to our ability to adjust the many variables in the process. Length is an easy adjustment to tinker with until you find what works best for you, the project and the materials. In general, I shoot for a thread length of 18″-24″.
  3. Work that thread conditioner! Yep, it makes a difference. I used to go back and forth on the subject–mostly because it was easy to get lazy over an extra step, but after so much handwork, I’m firmly on the side of using thread conditioner. While it is an extra step, doing it pays off in ease of use which in the end makes me feel like I’ve saved time and loads of frustration. My thread conditioner preference is the beeswax-based Sew Fine Thread Gloss, and I have some special collaborative scents available in the shop that you can find here.
  4. Tools and materials matter, especially when it comes to handwork. Always use the best tools and materials that you can. The reason I decided to stock some of my favorite scissors, thread and thread conditioner is because I believe in them, and I know how much they’ve helped me.

aurifil 80wt appliqué thread set . carolyn friedlander

Oh, and I just created a couple of quick thread knotting videos if you’re interested. First up is a Garment Knot, which I like using after conditioning my thread and before starting my appliqué.

And if you’re up for another good knot, here’s how you make a Quilter’s Knot.

Do you have any favorite thread tips? Feel free to share!

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