Tag Archives | tips and techniques

How to Bind the Quilted Coasters

I’m delighted to have something new for you–a video on How To Bind the Quilted Coasters.

big stitch coasters . carolyn friedlander

The binding on my Big Stitch Coasters seems to be a sticking point for many, and so I’m happy to be able to show you exactly how I do it.

how to bind quilted coasters . carolyn friedlander

The video includes picking out your fabric, creating your own bias tape, and then I go through all of the steps for attaching it to your coasters. I like to sew the top by machine and then hand stitch it down on the back. I’ll mention some tips too on how I’d attach it all by machine if that’s something you’re curious about.

Of course there are a million ways to do just about anything in sewing, this is just the way that works for me. I’m hoping it helps you too!

Everything gets better with practice. Don’t feel bad if it takes a bit to get the hang of it.

Let me know what you think and happy binding!

Links:

+ Big Stitch Coasters Tutorial

+ Binding Tutorial (on YouTube)

+ Here’s a link to some of the supplies I used in the video that can be found in the shop: Clover Seam Roller, Thread Gloss, Aurifil Thread, Hand Sewing Needles, Kai small scissors, Kai medium scissors. (Oh, and a special Crew pincushion makes a cameo too.)

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Thread Tips and Tricks.

Collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss . Carolyn Friedlander

With the launch of my recent collaboration with Sew Fine Thread Gloss, I thought it might be handy to throw some thread tips into a blog post. There are some super easy things that can make a huge difference.

  1. Work the thread in the proper direction, which is the direction that it is spun. Doing so will result in fewer knots. This might sound tricky and overly technical, BUT it’s super easy in practice and can just be a matter of creating a new habit. Here’s what you need to do; if you’re right-handed, knot the end of thread that you cut, and if you’re left-handed, knot the first end off the spool (or NOT the end that you cut). Keep in mind that this trick works with factory-wound spools and not any bobbins that you have wound yourself (because they’ve been re-wound in the opposite direction).
  2. How’s that thread length? If you’re having problems with knots, and you’ve already adjusted your knotting routine (see #1), then you might consider cutting a shorter length of thread. A shorter length might also be needed if your threads are starting to shred or thin out in the middle while you work. There’s always a balance between getting the maximum length of thread so that you’re not stopping and starting unnecessarily, BUT not too long that it’s wearing out the thread or getting knotty from all of the wear and excess length. Handwork is easily adaptable thanks to our ability to adjust the many variables in the process. Length is an easy adjustment to tinker with until you find what works best for you, the project and the materials. In general, I shoot for a thread length of 18″-24″.
  3. Work that thread conditioner! Yep, it makes a difference. I used to go back and forth on the subject–mostly because it was easy to get lazy over an extra step, but after so much handwork, I’m firmly on the side of using thread conditioner. While it is an extra step, doing it pays off in ease of use which in the end makes me feel like I’ve saved time and loads of frustration. My thread conditioner preference is the beeswax-based Sew Fine Thread Gloss, and I have some special collaborative scents available in the shop that you can find here.
  4. Tools and materials matter, especially when it comes to handwork. Always use the best tools and materials that you can. The reason I decided to stock some of my favorite scissors, thread and thread conditioner is because I believe in them, and I know how much they’ve helped me.

aurifil 80wt appliqué thread set . carolyn friedlander

Oh, and I just created a couple of quick thread knotting videos if you’re interested. First up is a Garment Knot, which I like using after conditioning my thread and before starting my appliqué.

And if you’re up for another good knot, here’s how you make a Quilter’s Knot.

Do you have any favorite thread tips? Feel free to share!

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tools of the trade : needle-turn appliqué.

 

applique tools_2_carolyn friedlander

 

I like to slow down and enjoy each project that I’m working on, especially when it comes to some good handwork. That’s the goal anyway and a big part of my slow sewing studio. But like everything else, it’s great to have the right tools for the project. So I thought I’d put together a list of the things I like to use when I’m doing needle-turn appliqué. Of course, I know there are plenty of other good brands and products out there, these are just what I’ve found to work well for me.

 

+ fabric for project

+ thread for project (such as Aurifil Cotton 50 wt.)

+ appliqué needles (such as Clover Gold Eye Appliqué No. 10)

+ appliqué pins (such as Clover Appliqué Size 12)

+ large fabric scissors (such as Karen Kay Buckley 7 1/2″ Perfect Scissors)

+ small fabric scissors (such as Karen Kay Buckley 4″ Perfect Scissors)

+ removable marking tool (such as Pilot Fixion pen or chalk marker)

+ seam gauge (such as Dritz Measuring Gauge)

+ iron (not pictured)

+ heavy paper (like cardstock) or template plastic (for copying template)

 

optional supplies : thimble, needle threader, thread conditioner (such as thread heaven)

 

What are your favorites?

 

 

 

 

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