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Euclid Fabric

Euclid Fabric

Good news, I have a little something to share.

Meet, Euclid–my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman. Euclid is quite a bit different from my other collections. First, this is an overprinted collection onto Essex–a linen/cotton blend and one of my favorite substrates from Robert Kaufman. All of my previous collections have been printed on their quilting cotton base, which means the look and feel of Euclid is a little bit different. Plus, it makes it so well-suited for tons of tasks at hand–garments, bags and accessories, and quilts.

Euclid Fabric . Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Totem Quilt in Euclid Fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Next, there are just 6 pieces to this collection. I’ve typically been a 1-collection-a-year kind of gal, which is why it has been supremely important to me that this collection offers things that my previous collections have not. And being just 6 pieces, meant I thought over and over (and over) about each one of them to make sure that they each brought plenty to the table and could be used for many many different things and in many many different ways. They’re a hardworking group!

Hesperides Shams . Euclid Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s the general overview. You can read more about the collection, see tons of projects (including my new ones!) and find out more about why this type of collection is so special to me by taking a look at this special Lookbook that I put together.

A big big thank you to Robert Kaufman for supporting not only this project, but for always supporting me in all the ways that they do. (And for creating some of the best fabric out there! If I do say so myself…)

Euclid fabric lookbook projects . Carolyn Friedlander

I owe a big thank you to Anna Graham (of Noodlehead) who created a special project (and free pattern) for this collection. You can see it in the Lookbook as well.

And another super big thank to you Alexis Wharem of Greenprint Photography here in Lake Wales. You might remember Lexi, because she is also responsible for all of the photography in my book, as well as the technique shots from my Collection Quilt pattern. It’s always a pleasure working with her, and she was able to capture the collection exactly how I imagined it.

I’ll be sharing more about all the projects in the coming weeks, so stay tuned.

I the meantime, thanks again for all of your support. I really hope you like this new collection.

Euclid Fabric Swatches . Carolyn Friedlander

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Sewing for baby: Totem quilt.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_10_Carolyn Friedlander

 

Almost any day now, my sister will be giving birth to her first kid. I’m excited to be an aunt again. My brother has two little boys, and they’ve been a great joy in my life as well as a blast to sew for. My sister however, is having a girl, which will change things up. I’ve gotten so used to needing to be creative with what I sew for my nephews. While there are some great boys-sewing projects and fabrics out there, the options pale in comparison to the overabundance of projects and fabrics for girls.

 

Today and tomorrow, I’m doing a couple of posts for two things that I’ve made for her and her new baby. First up, is a Totem quilt.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_Carolyn Friedlander

 

I started this project much earlier this summer, long before I knew the gender. Had I known what they were having then, it wouldn’t have changed much. I like the idea of creating something that can appeal to both baby–regardless of gender–and parents, and not necessarily cater to stereotypes. We don’t know what the baby’s tastes are going to be, so why not give her some variety? It was fun to make it more of a creative challenge to find a mix of things that would be pleasing to all parties involved.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_11_Carolyn Friedlander

 

Eventually, we did find out the gender, and so I might have loosened up by adding more small florals, that still weren’t too in-your-face-feminine. I kept to a soft palette of pretty peaches and blues, with some chambrays, gingham and other wovens for added texture. Of course, I also made sure that all of my fabric lines so far were represented–architextures, botanics and doe.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_12_Carolyn Friedlander

 

Choosing the fabric for the borders was a bit of a tough decision. I wavered slightly between going for more of a peach, but the soft Dusty Blue Essex linen that I went with was what I had in mind all along. It just looked and felt right. When I sister brought it into the baby’s room for the first time, we realized that the border fabric matched her rocking chair perfectly.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_13_Carolyn Friedlander

 

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_14_Carolyn Friedlander

 

On the back, I went with a pretty Leah Duncan floral print. I didn’t have quite enough, so I was able to squeeze in a little bit of a Lotta Jansdotter print as well. I love how the combination of the two worked out in terms of both color and pattern. The binding fabric is from Lizzy House’s Catnap line.

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_8_Carolyn Friedlander

 

 

Totem quilt for Laurie_15_Carolyn Friedlander

 

 

#totemquilt

 

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Doe Fabric Makes A Couch: Part Two.

 

After planning, piecing, and quilting the panels for the couch …

 

Cutting up the Doe couch quilt_Carolyn Friedlander

 

it was time to hack them up.

 

Cutting Doe couch quilt_Aerial Focal Totem_Carolyn Friedlander

 

To be honest, I was nervous about this step. But I measured and marked everything all out before making the first cut. At this point, my mom and I were both working on this, so I had her come by and double check that all of my measurements and markings were correct and in the right place.

 

When I actually cut it, it was more liberating than I expected and quite fun. I might need to hack up quilts more often.

 

Doe Circle Lattice cut up_Carolyn Friedlander

 

While I was doing that, my mom was busy making the cording…

 

Doe Couch cording_Carolyn Friedlander

 

Then we joined efforts to add the cording to the side and front panels.

It was fun to start finally seeing them come to life.

 

Making Doe Circle Lattice cushions_Carolyn Friedlander

 

And voila.

 

Doe couch_Circle Lattice side_Carolyn Friedlander

 

This is the more serious side…

 

Doe couch_Circle Lattice cushions_Carolyn Friedlander

 

And then here’s the party side. (I can’t stop thinking of this couch as being kind of like a mullet…)

 

Doe couch_Aerial Focal Totem side_Carolyn Friedlander

 

Doe Couch pieced side_Carolyn Friedlander

 

 

While making this project, I kept thinking about how the couch was kind of similar to a toy that I used to play with as a kid.

 

childhood picture blocks_carolyn friedlander

 

I wondered how well you’d be able to understand the design of each side of the cushions when they came together despite being cut and sewn up into separate cushions. The cushions can come together to create one picture, or they can be switched and flipped around into segmented pieces of the same puzzle. I like the three dimensionality of that.

 

Doe couch baby_Carolyn Friedlander

Photo by Elisabeth Woo

 

(Big thank you to Nathalie for the Doe baby model and to Elisabeth Woo for taking this photo!)

 

The whole continuity thing is something that I’ve been drawn to before–not in the three-dimensional way–but certainly when it comes to the fabric.

Alturas from my pattern line…

 

Alturas quilt continuity_Carolyn Friedlander

 

 

and Cowboy Circle Lattice from Savor Each Stitch.

 

Cowboy Circle Lattice_Carolyn Friedlander

Photography © Alexis Wharem, Greenprint Photography reprinted by permission by Lucky Spool Media, LLC.

 

In moving forward, I still have the two matching chairs to complete the set. With them, I’m thinking of somehow incorporating Post and going in a flame direction.

We’ll see…

 

#doecouch

#surpriseendingforthisone

#doefabric

#doevember

 

 

 

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