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SockSacks in Friedlander and Euclid.

I love a good gift-worthy project, and these SockSacks in my Friedlander and Euclid fabrics are some recent gifts that I made after being given one myself.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started when a friend made this one for me.

Sevenberry Sock Sack

I was immediately smitten with the fabrics and quickly fell deeper for it when I realized how perfect it is for transporting a lot of things. Obviously, it’s awesome for knitting–there are two interior sections divided by a zippered pouch. But it also works well as a travel bag for other things–like snacks and tea–both of which I travel with often. The compartments hold what you need, while keeping them divided and sorted nicely. Plus, it’s so darn pretty! (Fabrics in this one that was gifted to me are Sevenberry and London Calling from Robert Kaufman.)

Sevenberry Sock Sack

Since I’ve been loving mine so much, I decided that I needed to make a few more for some friends.

This one has some euclid on the outside…

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of my newest stuff on the inside and at the top

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

A little bit of carkai and more new stuff

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s a better pic inside. You can see the snap tabs, which are really great for keeping your yarn in check. I’m working from 2 skeins with my current knitting project, and the tabs are keeping everything anchored and tangle-free. Yay. Plus, the zippered section. You know that’s handy.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Picking fabrics is always one of my favorite parts. This project is fun for that because there are places large and small, meaning plenty of possibilities for print and color play.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

The other one that I made has this print on the outside, this one at the top, and this and this one the inside.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

I followed the instructions for both without making any changes, including not using interfacing. In general, I like things to have structure, but I also liked the idea of making these first two as instructed to see how I liked the weight. Of course I knew that using Euclid in the first version would give it more structure–and it does, but the quilting-weight-only version works out just as well! It’s a soft bag that isn’t likely to be put under much stress, so it makes sense. I did, however, elect for lawn in both of the drawstring casings. Lawn was used in the version given to me, and I really liked how lightweight it made it. The cord cinches everything up nicely, and while I’m sure quilting weight would work well for that part too, I was eager to embrace using the lawn.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : SockSack by Ramona Rose (I made the largest size, but after making that, I realized the size that I was given is the medium size. Both are nice! I’ll bet the small size is super cute.)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

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Fall sewing with Euclid.

I guess it’s getting cooler other places…right? You can’t really tell where I am, but in the spirit of seasons changing and warmer-wardrobes calling, here’s a little bit of fall sewing with Euclid. Bonus, both of these projects are quilty-crossovers. So if you’re wanting a garment project with plenty of quilty familiarity, here you go.

For the record, I’m actually not a fan of looking ahead to cooler temperatures–I prefer the heat–but this time I do have a little more to look forward to, specifically, the cooler-weather goodies that I sewed up waaay earlier this year in Euclid and haven’t gotten a chance to wear. (Note to self: Maybe cool-weather-sewing in Spring is a good idea? It gives you some new pieces to look forward to when you may not be excited about cooler temps otherwise…)

First up, my Quilted Vest in Euclid, (free!) pattern by Purl Soho. Looking at this, reminds me that I still need to sew on my snaps…

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I used wool batting, some architextures in the lining (this one), and machine quilted it. The pattern was relatively easy and straight-forward. Plus, it came together quite quickly.

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Tamarack Jacket in Euclid, pattern by Grainline. It’s a good one! My typical Grainline alteration is to shorten the sleeves a bit, which I did here. Otherwise, no changes were necessary for me. It looks like I also need to sew the closure hooks on this guy…I guess it’s obvious which parts of the project I tend to neglect…

Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like the vest, this is a quilted garment with wool batting, but unlike the vest, this guy is hand quilted. I liked the idea of it being softer and a bit looser. Plus I was able to play with thread color a bit. It’s lined in Cambridge lawn, which makes for the dreamiest of insides. Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Happy fall sewing!!

All photos by Alexis Wharem.

 

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Ruffle Front Jacket in Euclid.

Last week, I was in North Carolina teaching a couple of classes. I had a lot of fun, the students were all great. The local shop, Sewingly Yours, had just gotten some Euclid in, and they’d made a nice pile of it along with many of my other fabrics for the students to browse through. It was fun watching everyone working with and finding their own combinations for their projects–always one of my favorite parts of teaching. While in class, I received quite a few questions about some of my Euclid garments, and so I thought I’d share my Ruffle Front Jacket and Inari Tee dress.

First up, my Ruffle Front Jacket. So cozy and comfy…

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like many of the projects I’ve made with Euclid, this Ruffle Front Jacket is one I’d been eyeing for a while. The pattern can be found in the book, Simple Modern Sewing, a Japanese sewing book, but this one has been translated!

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

It’s a rather speedy project after you get your pieces traced out…and I think you might have to add seam allowances…it’s been awhile, so check the instructions. After that, cutting and sewing take no time at all.

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

I didn’t make any changes to the fit. The way the casing and cording work, it’s pretty easy to bunch up the neckline or loosen if needed. It’s a great layering piece, and has both a long and short sleeve option. I went for the shorter sleeve.

There’s also facing, which becomes the casing for the cording. Here you can add in a different fabric, which I always like the opportunity to do. I used a print from Carkai.

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

And cording, this is another project where you need some cording…which seemed to be a theme with my Euclid projects (see Seabrook bags and Landgate). After gathering (/hoarding) and auditioning several options, I liked the idea of making my own. In fact, I used the same fabric to make the cording as I did for my Landgate. In hindsight, it might have been smart to make it all at once, but that would have implied I had everything planned out…ha! (I didn’t.)

Euclid Ruffle Front Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Inari Tee Dress. The pattern is by Named, and you might recognize this from the Euclid Lookbook.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

The Inari Tee Dress is one of my favorites. I’ve made this pattern at least half a dozen times and in varying lengths and from varying fabrics. It’s a speedy sew, and I love the style of it. I especially like using linen for this project because it becomes the perfect layering piece.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

For the photoshoot, I layered it over a sleeveless Alder (pattern by Grainline, shortened to shirt length) in Carkai. I just love this combination.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

If you haven’t made the Inari before, I’ll give you a heads up that Named writes patterns for someone who is 5’8″ (they are Finnish!), which I am definitely not. So I’ve shortened this guy by several inches. I’ve also played around with the sleeve/armhole fit, but it’s still on the roomier side.

Euclid Inari Tee Dress . Carolyn Friedlander

Photograph by Alexis Wharem.

So there you have it, two more garments in Euclid. Both speedy, and both pieces I’ve had no problem working into my wardrobe and across a few different seasons.

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