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Eads Quilt Along #2: Fabric Thoughts and Strategy.

Eads Quilt Along #2: Fabric Thoughts and Strategy.

First, I just have to say that this is really fun. So much of the time, I’m working on something in advance, and I can’t talk about it. But with this quilt along, I’m able to be a little more in step with you and share in the process.

Plus, it’s been incredibly fun watching you start your own projects and hearing your thoughts about fabric and moving forward. Some of you have more specific plans and some of you are taking things as they come. There is a lot on both sides resonating with me–which is inspiring–and I hope you’re enjoying that connection as well. You guys are awesome, and your work is shaping up in such wonderful ways!

Eads quilt blocks to start . Carolyn Friedlander

First up is a project flashback to my original Eads. This is the first block shot that I could find, so it’s more than 10 blocks, but I think it’s a good mood setter for this week. I’d like to point out the hot mess that is my sewing room. There are piles and piles of fabric on the floor, all of which are the options that I pondered for this version. While mess, stress and deadlines all loomed in the making of the original, it was still incredibly fun to make and figure out.

With my new project, things are different. There’s not really a deadline (other than this QAL…which might be one reason why I wanted to do it…ha!), and in terms of fabric, it’s a little bit of a blank slate there too.

Has anyone had issues getting started?

I did. In fact, while I find the beginning of any project to be exciting, the blankness of it can also feel overwhelming, especially once you start digging in and plotting out the specifics.

To start, the newest collection from UPPERCASE had me intrigued since I was lucky enough to come home with a bundle of it after Quilt Market. Top of mind is always a great place to start.

UPPERCASE volume 2 fabrics

I broke apart the bundle and started to play around with the colors and how they work together. Then I hit my own stash and started grabbing other things that were calling my name.

In the photo below, you can see how I first had the UPPERCASE bundle organized at the top, then below I started to mix pieces from that collection with the fabrics that I was pulling. At this point, I was also starting to figure out the relationships between the pieces.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of the green pieces were really speaking to me. In fact, these larger-scale florals were hitting on an idea of scale play that I wanted to explore after making my first Eads.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s not a ton of deliberateness that needs to happen at this stage. It’s mostly a step for seeing how different fabrics might work together.

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

Eads QAL fabric pull . Carolyn Friedlander

If you saw my instagram post from the weekend, you know that what actually started to shape up looks nothing like this pile. So, here’s the plot twist.

At this point, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. In fact, that’s kind of what was starting to happen to me. While I easily could have started off with some of the greens, there was starting to be too many possibilities, and I was over thinking it waaay too much.

So, what did I do? Well, this is where I like to embrace coincidence and intuition. There was actually another pile calling my name, and it was the recent leftovers from making 2 shirts.

kalle dress shirts . Carolyn Friedlander

This is a lesson in how it’s ok to let the fabrics pick you. I’d made these 2 Kalle shirts–the top in a print from Architextures and the bottom in a Liberty of London print. The scraps from both were sitting around looking so cute and enticing together that I figured they’d make a cool block. Off I went.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Sometimes it’s easier to start with something that’s already been started, or with something that isn’t so clean and pristine, because there’s much less pressure associated with it.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

That’s what I did. And heads up, working from scraps is great, but it is definitely speedier working from the strips as outlined in the directions. I’m not complaining, but instead giving a heads up to any of you going this route. On the plus side, it does clean up the scrap pile!

After starting with these guys, I was able to get my creative juices flowing so that I could start thinking about the next fabrics to pull into the mix.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up was some Arroyo, a new collection by Erin Dollar printed on Robert Kaufman’s Essex. (I love this collection!) I’ll note that I had just made a shower curtain out of this print…are you sensing a theme?

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

And then I got brave enough to bust into some very treasured pieces that I picked up from Amitié while I was in Australia this past fall, along with a couple of pieces from carkai.

Eads QAL 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

So here’s where I’ll end this post with 10 blocks. I’m excited to be exploring some scale stuff–an area of initial intrigue–and I’m using some treasured fabrics in many of my favorite colors.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

What’s also awesome about this, is that I’m now seeing a way to connect back to the greens and other fabrics in my initial pull. Playing the intuition card is usually a good one. Even though I decided to change course, I figured that I’d be able to work my way back. I just needed a creative warm up to overcome the overwhelm.

Eads QAL week 2 . Carolyn Friedlander

Here are my tips for the week:

+ Overcome the overwhelm by just getting started! Grab the first 2 fabrics within eyesight, and I’ll bet they’ll help you over the hump. Also, trust your instincts.

+ When printing out your templates, select the “collate” option in the printer dialog so that A and B blocks alternate. This way you’re working evenly through your stack.

+ I noticed some folks wondering about fabric storage and organization for this project online this week. Create a box/tray/other designated vessel to house your blocks and fabrics for this project. (This route is a little more tidy than my floor method…see first pic.) Here’s a pic of a box that I’ve designated for my fabrics for this project. As for the blocks, they’re stored away nicely on my design wall.

Eads QAL fabrics

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SockSacks in Friedlander and Euclid.

I love a good gift-worthy project, and these SockSacks in my Friedlander and Euclid fabrics are some recent gifts that I made after being given one myself.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

It all started when a friend made this one for me.

Sevenberry Sock Sack

I was immediately smitten with the fabrics and quickly fell deeper for it when I realized how perfect it is for transporting a lot of things. Obviously, it’s awesome for knitting–there are two interior sections divided by a zippered pouch. But it also works well as a travel bag for other things–like snacks and tea–both of which I travel with often. The compartments hold what you need, while keeping them divided and sorted nicely. Plus, it’s so darn pretty! (Fabrics in this one that was gifted to me are Sevenberry and London Calling from Robert Kaufman.)

Sevenberry Sock Sack

Since I’ve been loving mine so much, I decided that I needed to make a few more for some friends.

This one has some euclid on the outside…

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Some of my newest stuff on the inside and at the top

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

A little bit of carkai and more new stuff

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s a better pic inside. You can see the snap tabs, which are really great for keeping your yarn in check. I’m working from 2 skeins with my current knitting project, and the tabs are keeping everything anchored and tangle-free. Yay. Plus, the zippered section. You know that’s handy.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Picking fabrics is always one of my favorite parts. This project is fun for that because there are places large and small, meaning plenty of possibilities for print and color play.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

The other one that I made has this print on the outside, this one at the top, and this and this one the inside.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

I followed the instructions for both without making any changes, including not using interfacing. In general, I like things to have structure, but I also liked the idea of making these first two as instructed to see how I liked the weight. Of course I knew that using Euclid in the first version would give it more structure–and it does, but the quilting-weight-only version works out just as well! It’s a soft bag that isn’t likely to be put under much stress, so it makes sense. I did, however, elect for lawn in both of the drawstring casings. Lawn was used in the version given to me, and I really liked how lightweight it made it. The cord cinches everything up nicely, and while I’m sure quilting weight would work well for that part too, I was eager to embrace using the lawn.

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

Pattern : SockSack by Ramona Rose (I made the largest size, but after making that, I realized the size that I was given is the medium size. Both are nice! I’ll bet the small size is super cute.)

Fabrics : Euclid, Carkai, Friedlander and Friedlander Lawn

Sock Sacks in Friedlander and Euclid fabrics . Carolyn Friedlander

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Fall sewing with Euclid.

I guess it’s getting cooler other places…right? You can’t really tell where I am, but in the spirit of seasons changing and warmer-wardrobes calling, here’s a little bit of fall sewing with Euclid. Bonus, both of these projects are quilty-crossovers. So if you’re wanting a garment project with plenty of quilty familiarity, here you go.

For the record, I’m actually not a fan of looking ahead to cooler temperatures–I prefer the heat–but this time I do have a little more to look forward to, specifically, the cooler-weather goodies that I sewed up waaay earlier this year in Euclid and haven’t gotten a chance to wear. (Note to self: Maybe cool-weather-sewing in Spring is a good idea? It gives you some new pieces to look forward to when you may not be excited about cooler temps otherwise…)

First up, my Quilted Vest in Euclid, (free!) pattern by Purl Soho. Looking at this, reminds me that I still need to sew on my snaps…

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

I used wool batting, some architextures in the lining (this one), and machine quilted it. The pattern was relatively easy and straight-forward. Plus, it came together quite quickly.

Euclid Quilted Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

Next up is my Tamarack Jacket in Euclid, pattern by Grainline. It’s a good one! My typical Grainline alteration is to shorten the sleeves a bit, which I did here. Otherwise, no changes were necessary for me. It looks like I also need to sew the closure hooks on this guy…I guess it’s obvious which parts of the project I tend to neglect…

Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Like the vest, this is a quilted garment with wool batting, but unlike the vest, this guy is hand quilted. I liked the idea of it being softer and a bit looser. Plus I was able to play with thread color a bit. It’s lined in Cambridge lawn, which makes for the dreamiest of insides. Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander Euclid Tamarack Jacket . Carolyn Friedlander

Happy fall sewing!!

All photos by Alexis Wharem.

 

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