Tag Archives | collection CF

Spools quilt in CF Grid Group

New project to share! I hadn’t made a new Spools quilt since the first one, and with new fabrics coming out, it was the perfect excuse to do it. Here’s a look at my Spools quilt made up in the CF Grid Group fabrics.

Photo by Alexis Wharem

The Fabric and Color Strategy

In the first version, I used 5″ squares, and with this one I worked from a fat quarter bundle of the newest fabrics plus yardage for the background. I’m really excited about the background–it’s Kona Sheen in Mossy Gold. It is mostly a neutral, but when paired with the greyscale fabrics it brings in some color and warmth. Plus, the shine on the fabric is so much fun to play with.

If you aren’t familiar with Kona Sheen, it’s a solid color base with a metallic layer printed across the top. The reverse side has no shine, and so I intentionally flipped some of my pieces over as little bits of accent. I think that it’s a fun detail!

Making Spools

If you haven’t made the Spools pattern yet, it comes together quickly and is really satisfying in terms of the way the prints and pieces come together. After each Spools block emerges, I couldn’t help but let out a little–it’s so cute!

This project is conventionally pieced, and great for any beginner.

Quilting Spools

Like in the previous version, I did some straight-line, machine quilting, but a little less of it than in my first version. Any time I’m quilting a grid, I do large, even lines across the entire project first before dividing sections any further. After my first broad strokes with this one, I really liked the loose-ness of it and decided then that it was where I wanted it to be.

CF Grid Group is my newest fabric collection and part of my Collection CF basics line. It should start shipping to stores in September, but you can ask your local quilt shop to get it on order now.

Pattern: Spools Quilt in the Wall size

Fabric: CF Grid Group plus Kona Sheen in Mossy Gold

Photo by Alexis Wharem

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Aerial Update And A New Version In My CF Grid Group Fabrics

I’ve been wanting to make a new Aerial quilt for quite some time. It was one of my early patterns, and one I’ve been eager to get back to. Here is my Aerial update.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander
photo by Alexis Wharem

The Design

The design is inspired by an imaginary view from above. It’s a fairly simple idea with loads of horizontal sections divided by diagonal slices and blocks of differing sizes.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

Technique and Fabric

The project is made using foundation paper piecing, which makes everything super easy and clean. You can work from 2 1/2″ strips. Bring on the scraps, yardage or whatever you have! I worked from the roll up of my newest CF Grid Group and a special Kona Cotton roll up that I put together to coordinate with it. To me this is a great example of how grayscale doesn’t necessarily mean lacking in color. Don’t you think?

CF Grid Group and Kona cotton fabrics for Aerial Update quilt . carolyn friedlander

Working With Other Substrates

Aerial works really well with solids and textural prints. It’s also great for working in other substrates, which was a big focus for me in my first version. Sewing onto the paper foundation stabilizes a variety of fabrics, making it easy by limiting stretch, drape or any other imbalance between the fabrics you are using. If you are new to foundation paper piecing and/or working with a variety of substrates, this is a great way to go.

Tip: Pre-wash and dry all fabrics when doing this to equalize any differences that might occur when laundering in the future.

The Aerial Update

I’ve updated the pattern to include the new sample. I made some tweaks to the blocks, and I changed out some of the project sizes so that the pattern includes four different size options; Throw, Runner, Wall and Baby. The pattern has six different blocks and coloring pages to map out your own version.

aerial quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Planning

In planning this project, I don’t tend to make an overall plan, instead I start with the fabrics and then I think about groupings of three fabrics for each block. I find that this helps break down many choices into something more manageable. Plus, it gives cohesion to each block and the quilt as a whole, while also making the sewing experience entertaining as I tried coming up with new three-fabric combinations for each block.

aerial quilt . carolyn friedlander

There’s an optional “Block Yardage” listing in the fabric requirements that you can use to add cohesion or to provide extra wiggle room if you are new to paper piecing.

Project Details

Pattern: Aerial Quilt Pattern

Fabric(s): CF Grid Group and Kona Coordinates

Bonus: Aerial was also a design I used in my couch! Here’s part 1 and part 2.

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Meet my new CF Grid Group fabric!

I have some fun news that I can finally share. Meet my new CF Grid Group fabric collection!

CF Grid Group fabric collection . carolyn friedlander

On Grids

It shouldn’t be a surprise, but I LOVE grids. There’s something wonderful about clean lines and repetition, and grids epitomize that. Plus, once you get a good grid on some fabric, it’s really fun to cut it up and sew it into a project!

projects made using CF Grid Group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Grids can add a nice structure to piecing as well as some delightful contrast to curvy shapes and appliqué.

collection CF grid group fabric projects . carolyn friedlander

CF Grid Group Fabrics

This is my Grid Group, which is part of my basics line–Collection CF. What I’ve done is take some of my favorite grid-like motifs from past collections and reimagined them in a new way and with a specific color theme–in grayscale.

collection CF grid group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

On Grayscale and Color

When I’m teaching a color class, one of my favorite points to make is how you can exaggerate the variety and nuance in a fabric pull when you reduce your palette down to a very narrow range. Doing this has a magical way of emphasizing variation in a beautiful way. It makes it fun to see more color in whatever you are working with.

This is exactly what I was thinking when I put this collection together. Even though this is a grayscale palette, together these 12 pieces feel really colorful to me, and they come to life in projects.

collection CF grid group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

Project Peek

And, I have some new projects, including a new appliqué project that I am just over-the-moon excited about. It’s called Bow, and it’s (maybe obviously) based on a Rainbow. I know I’ve dropped the ball a bit on my pattern releases recently, but I promise, this (and others I’ve been working on) will be real, and we’ll be able to sew together with them soon.

CF Bow quilt in CF Grid Group fabrics . carolyn friedlander

As for the new fabrics, you can ask your local quilt shop to get their order in now. The collection starts shipping in September.

Watch This

I put together a little video introducing you to the new group…along with more of a look at the projects on my YouTube channel here, and I’ll be sharing more about it all in posts to come.

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Hunt QAL #14 ALL DONE!

Hunt QAL #14. ALL DONE! My Hunt Quilt Along quilt is done, photographed and on my bed–a quilty miracle for sure.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

Binding

With the binding, I was unsure of which direction to go for pretty much the entire time. After much auditioning, here is what I came up with.

hunt quilt along binding . carolyn friedlander

An easy rule of thumb when you can’t decide on one binding is to go with all of them! This meant three fabrics in my case. I love that this satisfies all urges, and I think a scrappy binding suits many quilts nicely, especially this one. These choices are from Collection CF, Jetty and a Robert Kaufman gingham that might look black in the photo but is actually dark green. I love any gingham or grid in a binding, and the metallic adds just the right amount of sparkle.

scrappy binding in collection CF, Jetty and gingham

Hand Quilting

I don’t know what my favorite part about this quilt is, but the hand quilting is definitely up there. For a bed quilt it is massively cozy, and from a design standpoint I like how the high contrast thread stands out when you look at it.

big stitch hand quilting

The overall rows of straight lines in different directions is a pleasing contrast to the circular motifs.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

Scrappy Backing

The backing is super scrappy, which you can see better in this post. Just like choosing multiple fabrics for the binding, scrappy backings are just as appealing. The snippet below is another Robert Kaufman gingham. It’s really soft, which is a great backing quality.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

I’ve always considered this a two-sided quilt. I should get some shots of the other side too, but I’ll leave that for another day.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

The fabrics for the blocks are scrappy, but the quilting thread is consistent throughout. I think this ties things together nicely.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

The hand quilting makes it soft and cozy, and I’m really happy to have it finished.

Quilt Label!

Oh, one more thing! There’s a label! I’ve been way better lately at making and attaching labels to my quilts. I make a label (this one is definitely fancier than the usual ones I make) when making or attaching the binding. This way it’s ready to add after hand-stitching the binding. My labels include my name, the project name, project dates, contact info (if the quilt will be traveling), and the type of batting used. I’ve been all over the place with batting lately, and this helps me keep track.

hunt quilt along quilt label . carolyn friedlander

Finished and in use!

I actually slept under it for the first time last night, and it was all kinds of special.

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

Pattern: Hunt Quilt (templates here, here and here)

Fabrics: Mostly mine from many collections including Jetty, Collection CF, Botanics, Instead, Gleaned, Friedlander

Quilting Thread: Sashiko thread from Upcycle Stitches

hunt quilt along quilt . carolyn friedlander

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Project Ideas for a Long Weekend

With it being labor day here in the US, I thought I’d share some project ideas for a long weekend. Although I’m not sure what a long weekend actually means in the times of COVID. Aren’t the weeks and ends blurring together? Oh well. I’m going with it!

Appliqué Projects

Sewing is relaxing, and there’s nothing more relaxing to me than an appliqué project be it big or small. In fact, having a variety of appliqué projects at the ready is always my goal. To start the list, here’s something I cut out recently. It is two new blocks for my Scrappy Everglade Quilt (from my Everglade pattern). My rule has been to go one block at a time, but I got carried away and prepped two. I can’t help it. My fabric approach is to use some of my fabrics (Collection CF here) + Liberty of London.

scrappy everglade quilt blocks . carolyn friedlander

If your weekend energy is best suited for a relaxing project that you can settle in with and not fuss over too much–this is it. After picking your appliqué and background fabrics, you’re good to go.

For an appliqué project with more in terms of composing colors and shapes, Clay is a good option. Sometimes I want to feel like I’m painting with fabric, and this one is like that. I love simmering over the composition of a project for a few days, which is easy to do here.

clay mini quilt . carolyn friedlander

You could go small or big with this one, it all depends on what kind of a dive you’re ready to do.

clay throw quilt . carolyn friedlander

Pieced Projects

When you’re more in the mood to sit down at the machine, here are a couple of projects to consider.

First up is a mini quilt. They are creatively satisfying and not a huge commitment. Still a favorite is this Envelopes quilt from several years ago (here’s the blog post). The envelope liners are all fussy cut, which made for a satisfying deep dive into my stash. (Heads up on that, if you’re like me, you’ll make a huge mess in the process, but it’s really worth it!)

Fussy Cut Envelopes quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

For a larger project at the sewing machine, one that I’ve been thinking about lately is my Spools pattern. Since my friend Lee (of May Chappell) started this BIG Spools quilt, I’ve been wanting to make a bigger version myself. There is definitely a pile of 5″ squares in my studio reserved for this, which includes a charm pack of Rashida Coleman Hale’s Speckled prints. I know that I always say this, but there’s nothing better than sewing through a big stack of colors.

spools quilt . carolyn friedlander

Gift Sewing and No-Sew Projects

For anyone not in the mood for making a quilt, there are many other options. Lately I’m especially excited about projects that spruce up my surroundings or can be good to give to a friend. Here are a couple of projects that fall in these categories.

Cloth napkins are very easy, and they are something I use daily. If you’re looking to refresh something you use in your daily life or you want to put something together for a friend to spruce up their daily life, here’s an idea.

Friedlander Fabric Napkins . Carolyn Friedlander

Another favorite for me in the sewing-for-home department is custom dishtowels. You can get creative with embroidery and other embellishments, or you could just use a special fabric. Either option would be well utilized in a project like this.

euclid dishtowels . carolyn friedlander

Other projects on my mind by some of my favorite designers are a new bag (maybe this one by Noodlehead), some pouches (these or these by Aneela Hoey), and maybe even this handy wallet (by Megan Callahan) for the MQG.

How’s that? Does this give you some project ideas for a long weekend? Or is it overwhelming (since at least I just reminded myself of many things that I want to make)? Let me know, and I’d love to know some of your favorites too!

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Scrappy CF Coasters

One set wasn’t enough, so here are some more scrappy CF coasters that I made recently.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Actually, I guess that I have a lot of these in the works. They can be made from a charm pack, and so I grabbed a stack of 5″ squares from Collection CF and started pairing the fabrics together in different ways and in different sets. The first grouping was this one, and here is another grouping in pinks, peaches and lilacs. If I let myself really dream a bit, I think it’d be lovely to make an entire set of these big stitch coasters in all of the colors.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Binding Selection

One thing that is a little different about this set from the first is that I used different binding fabrics on each of the coasters. There’s no right or wrong in deciding this, it’s all a matter of taste and what you are feeling. In a scrappy set like this, I think the variety is fun, and I love seeing how all of the different fabrics play out in the bias trim.

scrappy bias binding in collection CF
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Selecting Thread Colors

I quilted each coaster with a different color thread. This adds even more character and color to each coaster and to the set as a whole. The quilting becomes more engaging, because you can think about and explore using different colors as you go–an entertaining way to quilt, if you ask me.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

This is a great project to grow (or start growing) your big stitch quilting skills. I also think it’s a great way to explore different ways to pair fabrics and explore color. Plus, it’s something that you can use around the house or gift to a friend.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander
scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Binding Tips

If you haven’t seen it already, I have a new video that I posted on making the binding and how to attach it to the coasters. You can head over here to check it out.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

Project Details

Fabric: Collection CF

Tutorials: Big Stitch Coaster Tutorial (here), Binding for Quilted Coasters video (here)

My favorite Hand Quilting tools.

scrappy CF coasters . carolyn friedlander

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How to Bind the Quilted Coasters

I’m delighted to have something new for you–a video on How To Bind the Quilted Coasters.

big stitch coasters . carolyn friedlander

The binding on my Big Stitch Coasters seems to be a sticking point for many, and so I’m happy to be able to show you exactly how I do it.

how to bind quilted coasters . carolyn friedlander

The video includes picking out your fabric, creating your own bias tape, and then I go through all of the steps for attaching it to your coasters. I like to sew the top by machine and then hand stitch it down on the back. I’ll mention some tips too on how I’d attach it all by machine if that’s something you’re curious about.

Of course there are a million ways to do just about anything in sewing, this is just the way that works for me. I’m hoping it helps you too!

Everything gets better with practice. Don’t feel bad if it takes a bit to get the hang of it.

Let me know what you think and happy binding!

Links:

+ Big Stitch Coasters Tutorial

+ Binding Tutorial (on YouTube)

+ Here’s a link to some of the supplies I used in the video that can be found in the shop: Clover Seam Roller, Thread Gloss, Aurifil Thread, Hand Sewing Needles, Kai small scissors, Kai medium scissors. (Oh, and a special Crew pincushion makes a cameo too.)

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Big Stitch Coasters in Collection CF

With the newest fabrics in Collection CF arriving in stores, I thought I’d share with you these new Big Stitch Coasters that I made in Collection CF.

The coasters are made using this free tutorial that I put together a few years back. (I’ve now given it a fresh update!) I use these coasters all the time, and they’re a fun thing to give away to friends.

big stitch coasters tutorial-stitch layers . carolyn friedlander

Small projects are perfect for trying out new techniques. If you’re wanting to give big stitch quilting a try, this is a great way to start. The commitment is small, and the possibilities are endless. Of course you could machine quilt them if handwork isn’t your thing, but I love the added color and texture of the big stitches.

It’s also a small and speedy project that can update something you use around the house, which I am all for. Or maybe you could send some to a friend to let them know you’re thinking of them. Both are worthwhile motives in my mind right now.

I made a point to update my favorite hand-quilting supplies, if you’re new to the game and want to find out more.

There are a couple more versions, but I’ll share them in a future post. Have fun!

Project Info

Tutorial: (Free) Big Stitch Coaster Tutorial

Fabric: Collection CF

Shop Supplies: Thread, Scissors, Needles, Marking Tools

+ Learn more about Hand Quilting Tools.

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Scrap Squares.

Scraps! I’m not sure where you fall on the scrap spectrum, but for me they can get out of control. In an effort to cut down on my scrap pile, here’s a new thing I’ve been trying this year–and I think it is helping. These scrap squares are just the colorful break and productive way to deal with scraps that I needed.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

Scraps

I’m a scrap saver, mostly because I find scraps to be handy. Whether I’m paper piecing, appliquéing, thinking about new color schemes, it is less daunting to work from a pile of scraps than it is to work from something more precious and pristine like yardage. But then it is hard to part with scraps, and the piles become unruly.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

The Plan

The idea is simple, but by giving myself clear direction and purpose it is much easier to act. Any random pieces of fabric–usually leftovers from a project–are cut into 2 1/2″ squares. Then I sew them back together into 16-piece scrap squares (4 squares x 4 squares). Of course, you could do more/less squares, choose a different size, whatever. This is enough of a plan for now for me. I am going for a bit of a checkerboard in terms of the value with repeated fabric choices in a block or split up depending on what is available in the fabric pile.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

This strategy has been especially helpful after cutting out a garment or other project that leaves you with random sizes and shapes of fabric. It’s satisfying to cut those things down into tidy stacks of squares. Plus, I like seeing remnants of those garments in my patchwork.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

Storage

After I cut the scraps into squares, I file them away in this handy little box. Having a place for things and everything in its place is key. Then when I have a few extra minutes, need to clear my head, want to explore a color combination and/or just want to sew I can hit the box. It’s a great creative reprieve when you need it.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

Sometimes I get an idea for fabrics that I want to see together, and this is a satisfying way to put an idea into action without getting too carried away. There are some fun finds here that I could explore more in other projects or just enjoy that they found their way in to this one.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

I’m sort of keeping the blocks similar in terms of color, but who knows. Maybe that’ll change if the mood strikes. Every once in awhile I’ll pull out the blocks and think about different arrangements.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

This is also a great place for mini charms that I’ve picked up at shows from other designers. I love seeing their prints next to mine and the variety they add to the project.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

There we go. I can’t say that the scrap piles have fully disappeared, but I can say that a lot of it has been diverted to a more orderly place with a colorful outcome in mind.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

Pattern: None. It’s 2 1/2″ squares sewn together in groups of 16.

Fabric: Scraps from many of mine, plus others’ like Elizabeth Hartman, Violet Craft, Anna Graham and Liberty Of London.

scrap squares . carolyn friedlander

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Clay Quilt Pattern

With everything going on in the world today, I have to admit that it is hard not to acknowledge that. My goal continues to be to make this space one that is full of creative comfort and inspiration, as well as inclusion. That said, I’m excited to finally share with you my new Clay quilt pattern. I’ve been finding a lot of comfort in projects like this lately, and I hope you do too!

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Clay is one of those projects ready for your own creative touch, which can take (literal) shape in all kinds of ways. Here’s just one of them.

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

If taking shape means creating a celebration of color–yes! It’s perfect for little bits of many different things that you may have been collecting. Or, if you want to focus on fewer colors while exploring the shapes and how they interact, then yes to that too!

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Shape

The motifs and design is one that I’ve had rattling around for years. (I have proof of that, stay tuned.) It’s a simple idea, and I feel like the simple ideas can always say so much. Having looked at these shapes for so long, I like how there are so many different things to see. Sometimes the shapes feel like plants, sometimes they might be rocks and other times I just like how they seem to communicate with each other. They are round-ish, kind of pointy, big to small and even better–in my opinion–when layered. This scattering of shapes is playful and engaging not only in looking at the finished project, but when you cut and lay them out as well.

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Color

There is a lot of color in this project. I used ALL of the current and incoming Collection CF prints, working from the charm pack. To give the range a bit more cohesion, you may notice a bit of a color gradation from the center out. (The size of the shapes graduate this way too, big to small.) Maybe the color gradation looks intimidating, but it’s really not that crazy to plan out. I just lined up my charm squares into a colorful order that I liked before cutting and laying out my project.

collection CF charm squares

Fabric

In addition to Collection CF for the appliqué pieces (cut shapes), I used Essex Yarn Dyed Linen in Lingerie for the background. I LOVE this fabric so much. The linen creates a good, sturdy texture for the prints to stand out and shine. Plus, I love how the linen quilts up. It’s just cozy and wonderful.

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

I used a bright yellow thread for the hand quilting, which you might remember a peek of awhile back.

sashiko big stitch supplies

I’ve been able to add a few spools to the shop if you’d like to add some to a project of your own. In fact, I’ve been adding lots of my favorite things to the shop over the last little while, if you’d like to check it out. (I’ll share more about all of it soon.)

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

Clay Quilt Pattern

The pattern includes several different size options with a coloring chart for each, as well as tips on color and composition. It’s a great beginner-friendly appliqué project as the (10) template shapes are a good size and feature gentle curves and points. If you’re super new to the technique, you can always start with the mini size option if you don’t want to feel too overwhelmed. Or, if a larger size is really speaking to you, then go for it! As another good hack, you can use more or less appliqué pieces in your project.

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

I have another sample that I finally finished up and will share with you soon, as well as more about the newest supplies in the shop…and my favorite needle-turn appliqué supplies.

Pattern: Clay quilt pattern, throw size.

Fabric: Collection CF plus Essex Yarn Dyed Linen in Lingerie.

clay quilt pattern . carolyn friedlander

+ Guide to Needle Turn Appliqué supplies

+ Thread Tips and Tricks

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Grove Mini Quilts

How do you feel about mini quilts? I love them. There’s something extra special and satisfying about making a mini, which is why I decided to add in a (literal) little bonus when giving my Grove pattern a refresh. With a new mini tree block included in the pattern, now you can make Grove Mini Quilts. Personally, I’ve already made two.

Mini Grove quilts . carolyn friedlander

There are many good things about a smaller format. Creatively, it’s a great way to try out a new color combination, print pairing or layout. There’s less pressure in terms of the time and material commitment. I find they always perk up a space without requiring a lot of space, and they make a thoughtful gift. If you aren’t into turning it into a quilt, you could always sew the smaller blocks into a bag, pillow, pincushion or other accessory too.

The new mini block conveniently required a new sample, which started off with a colorful dive into my scrap pile. I don’t know about you, but I’ve been finding comfort in color lately.

As I made the blocks, I threw them up on my wall, and I moved them around as I went. I find that I constantly simmer on layout while making blocks, and I really like that about the process. It’s very interactive.

Of course I ended up making more blocks than I needed, and so I divided them into two different quilts. They could have been sewn into one, but I liked the balance of having these two.

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

Grove Mini Quilt #1

The blocks are made from a pretty wide mix of colors from spice to tangerine to mint and yellow, but I think the sashing really helps cement the color statement. It was a big decision, but I loved this gingham and the color tone the best.

After deciding on the sashing, I was a little indecisive about going bold or blendy with the binding, so I did a little bit of both! The black piece is leftover binding from my TP quilt, and I love how it adds an accent. This is definitely a case of being enticed by something lying around that I hadn’t put away yet. (Don’t need to worry about putting it away now!)

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

I quilted all over with matchstick lines in the vertical direction. With there being all of the different colors and fabrics, I wanted the quilting to unify and add a dense texture.

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

Grove Mini Quilt #2

The blue one is pretty cute–if I do say so. There’s no sashing, it’s just 4 blocks sewn together with a border, pretty simple.

Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander

I tried to do something a little different with the quilting on this one, but still similar in the sense that it is an even, overall, dense-ish texture. This time it’s a rectangular grid, and I used an electric blue thread. That detail is subtle but fun.

Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander
Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander

You’ll find the new mini block included in the new grove pattern, as well as the specifics on the layout (sashing, border, etc) for the first version shown above.

Take this in whatever direction you’re feeling!

Pattern: Grove Quilt

Fabric: Mostly mine, plus a Robert Kaufman Crawford Gingham

Mini Grove quilts . carolyn friedlander

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Grove Quilt in Collection CF

My Grove Quilt Pattern was one of my very first patterns that I launched back in 2011. It’s a design I still stand by, and I’m so happy to have a new version to show you. Here is my new Grove Quilt in Collection CF.

Grove Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

The Design

Having spent most of my life surrounded by orange groves, I find there to be something really beautiful about their long rows and reaching branches. This design celebrates that with angular shapes that can be softened or highlighted with the color and fabrics you choose. Over the years, it’s been fun to see how these shapes play out in solids, prints and all kinds of colors.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

With new fabrics coming out in Collection CF, I knew this would be a perfect project to show them off. Some of the prints are more bold, and some are softer and read more like a solid. This print mix plays with the shapes in an interesting way.

collection CF fabric . carolyn friedlander

Fabric Selection

First I explored going with more of a uniform color palette, mixing the new pieces with some of the previous pieces in the collection. This one is heavy on the cool shades, and although I didn’t ultimately go with it, I think it would be very lovely!

fabric planning . carolyn friedlander

The way I’m auditioning the fabrics in the pic, the top two pieces would each be a tree, and the fabrics underneath would be the background for those trees. There are 12 blocks in the project. Of course you could mix it up and have different background fabrics too.

Ultimately I decided that I liked how the newest pieces worked together on their own, and this project would be a good way to show that off. The 15 new colors offer a good mix of lights and darks.

collection CF fabric 2020 . carolyn friedlander

I used 6 of the 15 pieces for backgrounds, which means each is used in 2 blocks. Then I used the rest of the fabrics to make the trees, with 3 of them being used for 2 blocks and the rest for 1 each.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

As for the sashing, I waited until I had all of my blocks made before deciding on that. Do you like picking this stuff out at the beginning, or do you tend to wait? I think I’m more often a wait-er. Sometimes I’ll have something in mind, but I pretty much always wait to auditione the different options with the actual blocks.

With the sashing I chose, I like how it adds some serious visual texture while still allowing the trees to pop. You could imagine how a darker choice would frame the blocks–just depends on the look you are going for!

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

Going with a dark border gives the quilt a nice frame. I really debated going with a something light and subtle, which I think could have worked nicely too. That would have been a totally different outcome.

Quilting

The quilting is straight-ish lines via free motion quilting. I outlined all of the trees first, and then I quilted in some repeated lines in the background. From the back you can really see it on the dark backing fabric. I like how this gives you an echo of the design on the back.

the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander
the grove quilt 2020 . carolyn friedlander

The Pattern

The pattern has been fully updated, and now it also includes a bonus mini tree block. I have a couple of new quilts using the mini block, and I’ll be sharing them here soon.

In terms of skill, it’s intermediate foundation paper piecing with plenty of guidance. On this pattern I have a full cheat sheet for you on the sizes of fabric to cut for each section of the block. If you’re new and want the guidance, it’s there for you. Or if you’re a confident paper piecer–do as you wish!

Pattern: Grove Quilt Pattern

Fabric: Collection CF, new 2020 colors

collection CF fabric quilts . carolyn friedlander

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