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2019 Fall Quilt Market in Houston

Before too much time gets away from me, I thought I’d share a bit from my 2019 Fall Quilt Market in Houston experience. (And do a giveaway!)

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

By taking a booth break this past spring, I found myself feeling refreshed and able to enjoy creating an environment to show off the things I’ve been thinking about and working on. Stepping back and looking at what you’ve done can be good. It makes me excited for the projects I most enjoyed and eager to get going on the next things. It may be a booth for me, but you could absolutely gather up some of your own recent projects, either physically or digitally, and reflect a bit on what you’ve been making. I’ll bet it gives you a little spark for whatever might come next.

Back to the booth, here’s what’s in there.

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

  1. Eads Mini blocks in Jetty, Kona Lemon Ice + scraps from my Eads Jetty + CF quilt (see #2)
  2. Eads Jetty + CF quilt (more details to come)
  3. Rye Quilt (large) in Jetty + CF (blogged about here)
  4. Rye Quilt (small) in CF (blogged about here)
  5. Rye Marmalade Quilt in Jetty, CF + Kona Cotton (blogged about here)
  6. Bartow Quilt in CF (stay tuned! More soon on this one!)
  7. Hearts Quilt in CF (blogged about here)
  8. Arlo A Quilt in CF (more to come)
  9. Hearts Quilt in Jetty (more to come)
  10. Crescent Tote (pattern by Noodlehead) in Jetty (more to come)

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

And some more…

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

Phew, so much stuff! I feel like I rarely share the booth details and projects all together like this. What do you think? Is it helpful to have a project hub? I’m hoping it’s an easy way to take it all in.

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

These Eads mini blocks have been something I’ve wanted to do FOREVER, which is to take leftovers from a big Eads project and work them into a mini version. This time, I’m using little scraps from the bigger project and letting 3 lemon yellow and light fabrics (both Jetty and Kona) take the lead. It’s totally a weekend project, and I’m excited to carve out more time to let it grow.

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

Carolyn Friedlander Fall Quilt Market Houston 2019 booth

There we have it. Thanks again to anyone who stopped by in person or followed along digitally!

++ Now a giveaway. ++

Leave a comment below about any project you’re excited about between now and Saturday, November 16 at 10am EST. I’ll randomly select a winner to receive a pack of the featured patterns in my booth as well as a mini charm pack of my newest fabric collection. Giveaway has ended. Thanks so much for everyone who participated!

carolyn friedlander patterns

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Hi, Harriot.

Hi, Harriot. Here’s a look at my newest fabric collection for Robert Kaufman.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has been a new experience in many ways. First and most obvious, there are yarn-dyed wovens in this collection! To say that this was a learning experience is definitely an understatement. Going from thinking about designs being printed on top of fabric versus ideas, colors and textures being woven together to create the fabric is pretty different. But it was fun, and the results can be something different to work into projects.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot has some yarn-dyed wovens, but it also has a couple of screen-printed designs as well. I’m really happy that I was able to have the mix of both. I feel like it gives you a lot to work with in many different ways.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

In thinking about plaids and textures, I couldn’t help but also think of things you might find in a forgotten wardrobe, and not necessarily a gender-specific one. It was in this idea that Harriot became the muse for this collection.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I chose this spelling for Harriot in particular after reading about Thomas Harriot and how he’s credited with making the first drawing of the moon through a telescope. This collision of history, observation and drawing couldn’t have been a better fit.

One of the screen-printed designs in the collection features a bold scallop that had me thinking immediately about all of the different ways it could be used (including many moon-like ones). I’ll start with the more straightforward approach.

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

An enticing motif is always well used as a prominent feature on a project like in the String Bag (above, pattern by Green Pepper Patterns), or as in the See-It-All Pouch and Two-In-One Case (both below and by Aneela Hoey in her book)

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

Harriot Fabric Projects . Carolyn Friedlander

But it can also be used in ways with patchwork and quilting that play off of the shapes when cut and sewn in different ways–one of my favorite ways to play.

Harriot Circles Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

My Circles Quilt was one of the first things that I wanted to make. I couldn’t wait to see the different ways that I could position the scallop print to be cut up. (PDF version of this pattern is coming soon!)

Similarly, you can see how peeks of the print mixed with plaids and other textures play with an appliquéd shape. Here’s new pattern Hunt–my newest appliqué project that I’m very glad to finally be able to share with you.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the appliquéd shapes are the same, but they’re made to look different based on where in a print they’re cut out. It was such a delight to figure out all of the cutting possibilities.

In contrast, here’s another version of my Hunt design with a very different (and easy) fabric approach.

Harriot Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

This quilt top (background, appliqué, border) and binding is made from just one fabric. That’s it. All along I’ve thought of the scallop design as a 3-for-1–colored stripe on one side, another colored stripe on the other, and a shapely motif that connects them. Use them separately, together or cut up and sewn together. Here I used all of one color stripe for the background and the other color for the appliqué. The border is cut to show off the scallop, which looks complicated but was really very easy.

My new pattern Hunt (and acrylic templates!) are coming soon. Stay tuned.

Also new, and a LONG time coming is this, meet Mini Eads.

Eads Mini Quilt Pattern . Carolyn Friedlander

Ever since releasing Eads, I wanted to do a secondary miniaturized option as well. It just works so well, and it can be a great place to make use of your scraps. More about this new pattern in another post, but for now you can see how the different pieces in the collection–including the scallop–can be cut up and pieced. The two-tone version on the right features a plaid from Harriot and Kona Grellow. I LOVE how Grellow fits into this collection.

One more thing to show you for now.

Harriot Tangelo Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s in a new version of Tangelo. Tangelo is always a good way to combine different colors and textures, and so it felt fitting to use with Harriot. You can also see the scallop print at play (blue row 4th from left) and how it can provide some nice variety along with the other pieces. I couldn’t wait to see this one come together. This quilt was a group effort made by my friend Ellen Rushman, my mom Kathy Friedlander and myself. Go team!

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

I’m thrilled to finally be able to share Harriot with you. There’s plenty more to share–including garments(!)–but I’ll stop here for now. I really hope you like the new line and that it can inspire you to do some sewing as it certainly has done for me.

Harriot Fabric . Carolyn Friedlander

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cf Mini QAL #3: Using An Accent.

cf Mini QAL #3: Using An Accent.

How did last week go for you? Did you like the two-tone challenge? I really did. In fact, I kind of like the idea of my project from the week being a jumping off point for a larger quilt.

cf Mini Quilt Along #2 . Carolyn Friedlander

While I was sewing, I realized how fun it would be to treat this mini as one block for a larger project. Can you imagine making more of these in different fabric combinations and then sewing them all together? I really like the idea.

On to the next challenge. Are you ready? This week is all about accents!

Using an accent can be an impactful way to make a statement or to see something in a new way. It can surprise your senses and break expectations. I’ll start with some examples, because it’s a tool that can be utilized in many different ways big and small.

In my original Babson quilt there are many areas of accent, which is a big reason why this pattern can be so much fun to sew.

Babson Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

Depending on how you pair your fabrics within each block, you can highlight–or accent–the variety of shapes in different ways. In mine, I sometimes worked with fabric pairings that were similar in order to create more subtle shape interaction, but I also worked with the opposite–implementing wildly different pairings in order to highlight the shapes at play not only within a block but also in a series of neighboring blocks. You can look at this example as a way of playing with accent without a ton of planning.

+ As a tip, if you’re working this way using a design wall (or the floor, etc) will be a great tool for seeing how your accents are shaping up.

Eads would be another example to check out that uses a similar approach.

Eads Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

That way of working can be liberating–or overwhelming–depending on how you like to work. There’s no need to stress if that isn’t your thing. Using an accent can also work in ways that are more deliberate. The Emphasis project from my book is a great example of that.

emphasis quilt and sewn stationery_carolyn friedlander

This project uses the exact same block design and the exact same fabrics across 3 samples that are made to look different based on how they are worked. In order to do this, I carefully mapped out each version so that different areas of the design were brought to life and highlighted in each variation. I loved exploring the various possibilities of what to accent.

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

Savor Each Stitch . Carolyn Friedlander

But maybe your first thoughts of using an accent weren’t expressed in either of these examples? I think this third set of examples is maybe the more common ways to think about an accent.

First up is a crowdsourced example from @thirteenquilts.

@thirteenquilts

Brandy is making Babson for the Quilt Along, and those pops of red are very effective accent. Maybe while you’re working you want to spice it up with an accent fabric/color of your choice.

Another example is from when I was developing the Lusk pattern. One of my unfinished samples was based on an idea of using an accent to highlight new shapes in the B version. Similarly here, I have a bright color to pop and a sketch to explore the idea.

cf Mini Quilt Along #3 . Carolyn Friedlander

What do you think? Ready to start using an accent?

Tips:

+ An accent can come from a fabric choice, your fabric placement and/or the quilting itself. Feel free to think about how to incorporate an accent at any/all levels.

+ Sketch it out! Use the coloring pages included in the pattern to figure out what you want to highlight.

+ Sometimes an accent can spice up your project as well as your attitude. Bored of a current combo? Spice it up and stay entertained!

cf mini quilt along . carolyn friedlander

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