Tag Archives | friedlander fabric

Grove Mini Quilts

How do you feel about mini quilts? I love them. There’s something extra special and satisfying about making a mini, which is why I decided to add in a (literal) little bonus when giving my Grove pattern a refresh. With a new mini tree block included in the pattern, now you can make Grove Mini Quilts. Personally, I’ve already made two.

Mini Grove quilts . carolyn friedlander

There are many good things about a smaller format. Creatively, it’s a great way to try out a new color combination, print pairing or layout. There’s less pressure in terms of the time and material commitment. I find they always perk up a space without requiring a lot of space, and they make a thoughtful gift. If you aren’t into turning it into a quilt, you could always sew the smaller blocks into a bag, pillow, pincushion or other accessory too.

The new mini block conveniently required a new sample, which started off with a colorful dive into my scrap pile. I don’t know about you, but I’ve been finding comfort in color lately.

As I made the blocks, I threw them up on my wall, and I moved them around as I went. I find that I constantly simmer on layout while making blocks, and I really like that about the process. It’s very interactive.

Of course I ended up making more blocks than I needed, and so I divided them into two different quilts. They could have been sewn into one, but I liked the balance of having these two.

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

Grove Mini Quilt #1

The blocks are made from a pretty wide mix of colors from spice to tangerine to mint and yellow, but I think the sashing really helps cement the color statement. It was a big decision, but I loved this gingham and the color tone the best.

After deciding on the sashing, I was a little indecisive about going bold or blendy with the binding, so I did a little bit of both! The black piece is leftover binding from my TP quilt, and I love how it adds an accent. This is definitely a case of being enticed by something lying around that I hadn’t put away yet. (Don’t need to worry about putting it away now!)

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

I quilted all over with matchstick lines in the vertical direction. With there being all of the different colors and fabrics, I wanted the quilting to unify and add a dense texture.

Mini Grove quilt . carolyn friedlander

Grove Mini Quilt #2

The blue one is pretty cute–if I do say so. There’s no sashing, it’s just 4 blocks sewn together with a border, pretty simple.

Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander

I tried to do something a little different with the quilting on this one, but still similar in the sense that it is an even, overall, dense-ish texture. This time it’s a rectangular grid, and I used an electric blue thread. That detail is subtle but fun.

Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander
Mini Grove quilt in blue . carolyn friedlander

You’ll find the new mini block included in the new grove pattern, as well as the specifics on the layout (sashing, border, etc) for the first version shown above.

Take this in whatever direction you’re feeling!

Pattern: Grove Quilt

Fabric: Mostly mine, plus a Robert Kaufman Crawford Gingham

Mini Grove quilts . carolyn friedlander

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Hunt QAL Month #2 Check In.

Hunt QAL Month #2 Check In.

I really won’t say this every month, but seriously, it’s already been a month?!

This month has been a fun and a productive month for my QAL project. Not only do I love July. I love that it is right in the middle of the summer, that it marks the end of the first half of the year, and that it can sometimes mean a bit of summer travel. This July has been all of those things, including a fun, travel adventure, I spent an entire week across the country in Sisters, Oregon for the Quilter’s Affair. It was wonderful, and I was able to get quite a bit of my Hunt project underway on those long flights.

Hunt QAL . carolyn friedlander

At this point, I have 1 block totally finished, 1 block halfway finished, and 3 blocks fully basted. My goal for the next month is to prep and baste 2 more blocks and to fully finish 2 1/2 more blocks so that I have 4 blocks fully finished. Yeah!

Hunt QAL . carolyn friedlander

I’m not totally sure about including the Harriot striped fabric–I’m still not sure on the color being exactly what I’m going for, but I’ll keep going with it. I’ve pretty much decided that I really like the blue Friedlander Lawn that’s in there. It’s been enjoyable seeing how that fabric appliqués up with these shapes. I’m also really really happy to be using the green and some other prints from my upcoming new Collection CF fabrics. (Blog post to come soon!) There’s one green in the collection that is perfect for what I’m going for, and there are also several good background options that I’m happy to be working in there.

Hunt QAL . carolyn friedlander

In other Hunt news, my trip out to Sisters was very relevant. Not only did I teach a class using my Hunt pattern, but I also had a couple of my Hunt quilts hanging in the shows. Here are some pics from class and then from the show.

Hunt Quilt class . carolyn friedlander

These are different student blocks from our show and tell at the end of class. I always love how great the blocks from different people look together. I feel like it can give you ideas for things you wouldn’t otherwise think of. (Other blocks are from my Alturas and Park patterns.)

In the big quilt show on Saturday, my Hunt Harriot Quilt was hanging as part of the quilts from QuiltCon exhibit.

Hunt Harriot . carolyn friedlander

Hunt Tangerine hung in a special show with my quilts on Sunday.

Hunt Tangerine . carolyn friedlander

So many Hunt happenings this month!

If you’re following along for watching/listening recommendations, here you go. Some recent watchable recs are Minding The Gap, Instant Hotel (on Netflix) and the Weekly (from the NY Times). As for listening, I might have binge-listened the entire Man in the Window podcast while working on my Hunt on airplanes, etc this month. It sucked me right in!

I hope this month has treated you well! If you have some good recs or monthly highlights, don’t hesitate to leave a comment or to reach out.

Happy Hunting.

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Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Hunt Quilt Along: Project Overview.

Yay, I’m so glad that you’re joining in! And I’m really excited to hear that many of you are happy about the year-long format. It’ll be good!

This week I’m doing a bit of an overview, and I’m going to show you some different ways to think about the project. I always love a project that can be translated in different ways, and Hunt fits that calling perfectly.

You’ve already seen this version.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

It (more here) is a celebration of color and texture, and it also shows the idea that you don’t have to treat every piece the same. In addition to using many colors, prints and wovens for the appliqués (or cut shapes), I fussy cut different sections from the scallop print in Harriot to add interest and variety to the shapes. Here are some that I cut first, before auditioning in the project.

Hunt scallop cutting . carolyn friedlander

Although I used many different fabrics for the appliqués, I used the same fabric for the background. I feel like that makes the different colors really pop.

Hunt Harriot Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

There’s also this one that you’re familiar with.

Hunt Tangerine Quilt . Carolyn Friedlander

In contrast to the previous example, this version only features 2 colors–and actually just one fabric (see here.) With a 2-color project, you can see how much of a visual impact you can make.

Another 2-color example is the vest I made using Hunt.

Hunt Appliquéd Vest . Carolyn Friedlander

You’ve seen this before too, but it’s a good thing to bring up, because I want you to see that you don’t have to think about this design as only ending up as a quilt. These motifs can thrown on just about anything–clothing, bags, whatever!

As a little bonus, here’s a look at another idea I explored early on.

In addition to a 2-color direction, I also considered mixing it up and using different fabrics for the appliqués on the vest. There was also some play with the placement, but what a different look!

And now to some other things to think about that you may not have seen…

First up is a block using my newest fabric. It’s a block from when I was considering making a Hunt sample for the release. I ended up focusing on other things, but here it is. The new collection is all dark and moody, which I thought would set a neat tone. As far as the layout was concerned, I imagined using different 2-color fabric combinations within each block. This would give you another effect, and I’m still intrigued by the idea.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

On a side note, while basting this project I was reminded of how much I enjoy this part of the process. It’s repetitive, satisfying and very relaxing. At the end of a long day, this is the perfect thing.

Hunt Instead . Carolyn Friedlander

Another example in quilting cotton is this block that started as a demo piece for Quilt Market last fall and has stayed a class demo and sample. In terms of color and fabric, I’m sometimes drawn to combinations that are not always high in contrast and can speak to a theme. The blues in these fabrics are similar-ish in value, but the shades of them are pretty different. It almost clashes in a way that I really love.

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Plus the prints themselves (mostly from Harriot) play off of each other in a neat way. Lines and grids and texture are all coming together.

This one is a great example of how awesome it is to see the shapes separate and start to define themselves as they get turned under during appliqué. I love this reveal between the shapes in this pattern. I really want to see this one appliquéd!

Blue Harriot Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

Here’s another block made from quilting cotton. This one was my very first tester block when I was playing with the motif. It too doesn’t have a ton of contrast in terms of the fabric that I chose. It’s soft and subtle. One of the fussy-cuttable motifs from Friedlander was fun to cut up and use.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

As a general note, working with quilting cotton will be the easiest place to start with this project and with appliqué in general.

Hunt tester block . carolyn friedlander

Now for some other technical approaches!

Here is a raw-edge, fused and matchstick-quilted sample that I made to show off some other ways you could take this project in terms of technique.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

All of the shapes were first fused to the background, then layered with batting and backing, and lastly quilted with lots of straight lines close together. This is a totally different approach, and it has a really nice effect.

In this case, you’d cut your shapes from the template without seam allowances, because it’s raw edge, and you’re not turning anything under.

Raw Edge Hunt block . Carolyn Friedlander

You can also mix techniques in the same project and even in the same block. Here I appliquéd some of the shapes normally (on the background panel), and then I sandwiched it together with batting and backing, and have started quilting in the motif.

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

I’d love to see something like this played out across multiple blocks together. I think it could look really great!

Hunt Quilted And Appliquéd . carolyn friedlander

This panel is simply embroidered (with my favorite bright orange embroidery floss). (Although, not finished, yet…)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Simple idea, but it’s another great way to explore the motif. (You’d use the seam-free template here too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

Wholecloth is also a possibility. Pick a plain fabric or one with something going on–either way, I think it could be a neat direction to go.

Wholecloth Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

(This would use the seam-free template too.)

Embroidered Hunt . Carolyn Friedlander

There we have it, a few ways to look at the project. And that’s just the start! I hope seeing these examples is helpful as you start to think about the direction you want to go.

I’ll leave things here for now, and I’m including some relevant resources below if you’re interested in a deeper dive.

Let me know what you think, and I’m really glad you’re following along!

Resources:

+ Some of you asked for recommendations on good places to start with appliqué. My Trudy block on Creative Bug is a fantastic place to get some practice if you’re looking to do that before starting in on your own Hunt. Not only is this a very manageable size, but the videos will walk you through all the same steps technical steps that you’ll be using to make Hunt as well. Like Hunt, my Trudy block gives you an opportunity to work on outside curves–in this case they’re nice and gentle–which is good practice before tackling the tighter, outside curves in Hunt. (If you’re wanting a more indepth look at appliqué, you can see this other project from me on Creative Bug as well.)

+ If you’re curious about supplies, read about my favorite appliqué tools in my blog post here.

+ If you still need a copy of the pattern or templates, you can find the pattern here and the templates here.

+ If you’re following along, I’d love to see your progress! Feel free to share using #huntQAL … And there might be some giveaways as we go along.

Hunt Quilt Along . Carolyn Friedlander

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